HEALTH CARE

Jubilee Ministries Alabama Mudiam

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

We are new to Jubilee Ministries in 2017, but have been serving our community for nearly 30 years. St. Michael's Clinic is the only provider for the uninsured in West Anniston, the largest population of the uninsured in Calhoun County.

 

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

The role of St. Michael's Community Services, Inc. is to minister the love of Jesus through the provision of healthcare to those who otherwise have little or no access to services. The ministry is an outreach of The Church of St. Michael and All Angels. The focus of the work is to offer medical services to those without access, connect patients to needed resources, provide social services such as patient education, and to provide an organization to which concerned citizens can confidently invest in meeting the needs of those living with health disparities. Thousands of patients have been served in West Anniston and the surrounding communities of Calhoun County.

To see more of the Diocese of Alabama's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

Working alongside those struggling with poverty and health disparities has opened my eyes to the value of community resources. Working together with others in our community, we can alleviate the burden of poverty. I think poverty is an issue that can seem so overwhelming that we feel powerless to face it. But if those who seek to love and serve Jesus would turn their hearts toward the poor, collectively we can truly help our neighbors. Disparity in privilege should not dictate the allocation of resources.

Episcopal Jubilee Mudiam Poverty Ministries

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy is a fighting word to me. I do not mean to stir thoughts of violence, but rather of strongly held convictions that I feel compelled to address. One of the primary roles of St. Michael's Community Services, Inc. is to advocate for the needs of our patients. They need someone who understands the healthcare system and can navigate it in such a way as to meet their basic healthcare needs. Advocacy in our ministry often meets a persistent pursuit of locating resources to meet the needs of our patients.

Episcopal Jubilee St Michaels

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

We see Jesus in the faces of every patient. In the notable passage of Jesus in Matthew 25, when we serve the least of these, we have served Jesus. These faces are housecleaners, waitresses, those struggling with addiction, the undocumented worker, the ex-convict, the homeless, the mental health patient, and others who have been marginalized, who have fallen through the healthcare gaps in our community.

Episcopal Where I See Jesus

What a privilege it is to serve them. I am so grateful for the opportunity. Jesus can also be seen in the application of His commandments to us. In the performing of the acts that Christ has called us to perform, Christ then is portrayed to those we encounter. It is Outreach/Evangelism in its truest sense. Jesus is seen in our work.

 

Nanette Mudiam is the director of St. Michael's Medical Clinic in Anniston, Diocese of Alabama.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? We are new to Jubilee Ministries in 2017, but have been serving our community for nearly 30 years. St. Michael's Clinic is the only provider for the uninsured in

St. Andrew's Children's Clinic Arizona Episcopal

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

I have been involved with St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, a Jubilee Ministry, since 2001. I had never heard of a Jubilee Ministry before then. The Reverend Ed Gustafson, then Executive Director of The Clinic, applied for Jubilee status a few years prior to that. He was quite proud of the status, and when I learned what the designation meant I was proud too. I am a volunteer with The Clinic.

To learn more about St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, visit www.standrewsclinic.org.

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

Currently, I serve as Publicity Coordinator at St. Andrew's Children's Clinic. In this volunteer position, I take photos at the monthly clinics, write a biannual newsletter, update the Clinic website on a regular basis, create special mailings, write press releases, facilitate tours by media, create exhibits, and anything else I can think of to promote the good work of The Clinic. I also give presentations about The Clinic when the Executive Director cannot, and I staff an annual exhibit at the Arizona Diocesan Convention. I organize and perform at an annual recital to benefit the Augmentative/Alternative Communication Department at The Clinic. This department works with children who have limited or no ability to speak. We have found that an iPad with special communication software in Spanish can give these children a voice. With the program, they can interact with others. They press icons, and the iPad speaks for them.

In my parish, I serve as an informal liaison between The Clinic and Church. I write a column about The Clinic for the parish newsletter.

Jubilee Ministry volunteers, executives, and clients come from a variety of contexts and work. Check out the breadth of our work at The Episcopal Asset Map.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

The mission of St. Andrew's Children's Clinic is to provide free, specialized medical care to children living in Mexico who cannot get the care or afford the care they need in their home country. Our patients include those with spina bifida, brittle bones disease, club foot, cerebral palsy, cleft palate/cleft lip, hearing loss, impaired or lost vision, nutritional deficiencies, speech difficulties, to name a few.

The love these parents show for their children is amazing. They work with their children during the month to do the therapies that are prescribed. They patiently care for their children who have physical difficulties. I have watched a father feed his cerebral palsied daughter for 45 minutes without once hurrying her. I have watched mothers carry children bigger than they are.

St. Andrew's Children's Clinic Episcopal JubileeI am always amazed at the patience of the families who travel many miles to get to our monthly clinic. Some have traveled just across the Border, but many have spent 4-15 hours just getting to The Clinic and this probably was by public transportation. Then, they walk across the Border where The Clinic transport takes them to St. Andrew's Episcopal Church where The Clinic is held. They wait in line until their number is called. This lets them into the waiting room where they might spend most of the day between appointments in the different departments. In all this time, they are patient; their children are well-behaved. They never fail to express their gratitude to the volunteers who provide the care their children need.

One of my most blessed happenings was when a child with Down syndrome and limited speech kissed me in thanks for the iPad which would give her a voice through special software programs. Another was watching tears roll down a mother's cheeks when her son heard with his hearing aids for the first time.

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy means speaking out for those who need our help. This is easy for me in regard to St. Andrew's Children's Clinic. Jesus said, "Suffer the little children to come unto me..." I see all the children at The Clinic as children of God who need our help. Because their need is so great, it is easy to advocate for them.

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

St. Andrew's Children's Clinic Episcopal Jubilee

Jesus is at work every clinic, guiding the hands of the medical personnel, soothing the children who are frightened when casts are sawed off, helping in the kitchen to prepare food for the patients and parents, helping volunteers entertain children in the Arts & Crafts area. He is in the faces of each patient. As the newsletter editor, I take many of the photos that are featured. I am always told that they are great and that people like the newsletter. I am not a professional photographer. Rather, I trust that Jesus will guide me in getting the photos that tell the Clinic's story. He never fails me.

 

Dr. Vicki Fitzsimmons is a volunteer with St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, a Jubilee Ministry in the Diocese of Arizona.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

 

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? I have been involved with St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, a Jubilee Ministry, since 2001. I had never heard of a Jubilee Ministry before then. The Reverend Ed

The following article, reprinted with the author's permission, was transcribed from the January/February 2015 issue of The Church News, the newspaper of the Episcopal Diocese of West Texas.

It began as a vision for St. Barnabas, Fredericksburg—to go out and be the church, to make a difference in their community. The vision was for a project that the entire congregation would rally around and become involved. After some research at local non-profit and social agencies, St. Barnabas decided to partner with the Good Samaritan Center in Fredericksburg, a charitable medical and dental clinic for low-income families that do not have health insurance. (The Good Samaritan Center is no affiliated with Good Samaritan Community Services in San Antonio and throughout the diocese.)

The Good Samaritan Center was founded in 2004, and since its inception, the directors have shared a desire to employ a social worker to go into the community and promote healthy ways of life, proactively meeting and engaging people in their homes, neighborhoods, and workplaces to educate on multiple areas of wellness.

When John Willome became the director of the Good Samaritan Center in 2006, he couldn’t get the program started. “We didn’t have the funds, and we didn’t have the right person for the job. Extra funding was going toward a part-time dentist on staff to triple our capacity; we were handling our services as we could, but we still didn’t feel we were offering enough proactive services.”

In the summer of 2014, the board of the center finally put the plan into action. A current staff member, Delia De La Cruz, was considered just right for the position. All the center needed was a good plan for funding.

At this time, the Rev. Jeff Hammond, rector of St. Barnabas, stopped by to visit with Willome to share the church’s vision and to see about a community partnership. “After offering several community projects I knew of, I mentioned our desire to hire a community social worker,” said Willome. Hammond took that idea to the St. Barnabas Vestry, and the church committed to funding the first year’s salary of the new social worker, a total of $40,000.

“I liked the idea because I know the Good Samaritan Center has a lot of credibility in Fredericksburg, and that they are good stewards. Also I knew we, as the church, could stand behind Delia and pray for her and her work every week. But I was terrified we weren’t going to be able to deliver. I was ye of little faith,” said Hammond.

Instead of planning a fundraising event, two members of the congregation, Jenny Weiser and Pris Williams, suggested a Non Event. The church printed invitations to the Non Event fundraiser that stated reasons for giving—the goal of funding for a Community Health Worker and the need for one—and asked for support, stating, “Just imagine: no formal attire required, no babysitter to schedule, no auction to bid on, and no valet parking.”

“You just never know how God is going to move through your efforts. This idea really resonated with people,” said Hammond. Each member of the congregation was asked to mail at least five invitations to their personal acquaintances with a hand-written note. The donations quickly followed.

As of December, St. Barnabas had received over $70,000 to fund this program. “It is amazing; I still can’t believe it,” said Hammond. Funds have come in small and large gifts from members of the congregation and from over 200 people not affiliated with the church.

“We are so thankful,” said Willome, “and this job is working better than we ever imagined.”

De La Cruz started full-time last summer. The amount of $40,000 funds her first year’s salary, training and certification, and the weekly travel to San Antonio for the training. “She is nailing the training, making A’s on her work,” said Willome. In February of this year, De La Cruz will take her state social worker certification exam.

In her new position, De La Cruz is meeting with other entities in Fredericksburg that also work with the Good Samaritan Center’s clientele. She has formed a working relationship with the local youth juvenile officer and has met with area young people and their families to talk about drug addiction and sexual behavior. She recently provided education on insulin and its structured needs to a family who had accidentally overdosed their diabetic grandfather. The grandfather was treated and is recovering. “Her efforts are reaching far beyond diabetes and weight control,” said Willome. “There is just so much going on out there, and by becoming proactive, we are turning over new stones.”

As the funds received far surpassed the goal of $40,000, both St. Barnabas and the Good Samaritan Center are in conversation about how to best use the remaining balance. “there is the idea to fund the second year or to fund a special part of our program, such as hiring one or two more community health workers, getting them trained, and having them work for a stipend under De La Cruz to leverage our program,” said Willome.

“We wanted to do something that was not about us at all,” said Hammond. “We wanted to do something for our town; not just perpetuate our own existence. We are receiving a lot of good feedback and appreciation, and I still can’t believe our success; we are forever grateful.”

The following article, reprinted with the author's permission, was transcribed from the January/February 2015 issue of The Church News, the newspaper of the Episcopal Diocese of West Texas. It began as a vision for St. Barnabas, Fredericksburg—to

Samuel McDonald, Director of Mission and Deputy Chief Operating Officer of the Episcopal Church, has announced 14 recipients of the Episcopal Church Jubilee Grants, totaling $49,965 to support mission and ministry in 11 dioceses.

Jubilee Ministries are congregations or agencies with connections to the Episcopal Church, designate by diocesan bishops and affirmed by Executive Council, whose mission work affects the lives of those in need, addressing basic human needs and justice issues.

Grants were awarded in two categories: Impact and Development.

Thirteen Impact Grants, ranging from $855 - $1,500 each was awarded to initiatives of Jubilee Centers that make a positive and measurable impact on the lives of those in need.

Holy Cross Episcopal Church of the Diocese of Western Louisiana was awarded a $1,200 grant to provide health education and healthcare, via the parish’s mobile medical van, to those in the community lacking access to services.

A seven-member committee with representatives from throughout the church reviewed 67 applications for grants.

Holy Cross, Shreveport, has been a Jubilee Ministries Center since 1984. The Rev. Mary Richard is the Jubilee Officer for the diocese and may be contacted by email at mbrichard47@yahoo.com.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Mobile Medical Ministry is the mobile medical ministry of the eight Episcopal churches of northwest Louisiana. Using the medical RV, free preventive health screenings, basic health services, health education, and medical referrals on a regular basis are provided to the underserved in the rural and urban Louisiana communities of Caddo, Bossier, Webster, Desoto and Claiborne parishes.

The mission goal is to break down the barriers that keep people from accessing health care, believing that all individuals have the right to health care. There is no charge for the services, which is especially helpful for the uninsured or underinsured. Care is offered to everyone who comes to the medical van site.

St. Luke’s chose to be mobile so that health services can be offered to communities in the settings were people live and work. In doing so, both accessible and quick health care can be offered to those who lack transportation or do not have the ability to take time off from work. Regular return visits to each community provide follow-up care to individuals and the development of long-term relationship with the community based on trust.

The volunteers at St. Luke’s look at the whole person—their physical, emotional, spiritual, and social needs—working closely with other community organizations to refer individuals to appropriate services to that their needs can be met. While health screenings are quick, care is taken to spend as much time as needed with each individual.

Educating all who come into the van about their health and ways to take care of themselves helps to empower them in making healthy choices.

After an assessment of the needs of each Louisiana community visited and tailoring services to best meet those needs, free, basic, non-emergency health services and preventive health screenings are offered.

Screenings provide an early warning of an impending condition that, if gone untreated, could have much higher costs to the individual and community. The offering of preventive services and the discovery of chronic illnesses early on saves the greater health care system money by avoiding costly emergency room visits and costly treatment of complications that occur when chronic illnesses are not caught and treated in their early stages. To learn more about this, check out the “Return on Investment” calculator at www.mobilehealthmap.org.

Screenings offered include hypertension, diabetes, nutrition, and breast health.

Time spent helping clients to better understand their disease process and how to best mange it can bring about healthy lifestyle changes. Providing instruction in ways for individuals to take care of their health and the health of their family members gives both information and tools which then empower them to make healthier choices.

Health promotion and education subjects include nutrition and exercise, disease process and management, tobacco and alcohol cessation, medication management, and breast health education. 

This article, compiled with information from The Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs, the Church of the Holy Cross-Shreveport, and the St. Luke's Episcopal Mobile Medical Ministry website, is reprinted from the January 2015 issue of Alive!, the newspaper of The Episcopal Diocese of Western Louisiana.

Samuel McDonald, Director of Mission and Deputy Chief Operating Officer of the Episcopal Church, has announced 14 recipients of the Episcopal Church Jubilee Grants, totaling $49,965 to support mission and ministry in 11 dioceses. Jubilee

St. Benedict Health and Healing Ministry has very specific goals, the chief of which is, naturally, to heal those who are ill in body, mind and spirit. An institution and Jubilee Ministry of the Diocese of Colorado, St. Benedict’s is a point of access to healthcare for underserved and unserved populations in Boulder County.

The story of the founding of St. Benedict Health and Healing is important to its continued success—and it centers on a single person: the Reverend Sally Bowersox, a priest, registered nurse, and the founder/executive director of the ministry. Having practiced skillfully as a nurse for years, she received a call to the priesthood in 1998. As her discernment process evolved, Bowersox felt that parochial ministry was not part of her calling—rather, in consultation with a pastoral theology professor, she found that her calling involved both health and faith. Having opened herself up to God’s use, she began thinking of ways to integrate the two. Because she had always been on the front lines of nursing, she was ready to get her hands dirty. As she progressed through seminary, her guiding image took shape: Carrying a black bag of health care items and working on the streets.

After graduating, Mtr. Bowersox accepted a call at Our Merciful Savior Episcopal Church in Denver. There, among a predominantly Hispanic population, she found her congregation had a shortage of access to health care. The seeds of ministry were planted as the parish formed a blood pressure clinic in the church basement.

By 2003, the ministry had taken on a life of its own outside Our Merciful Savior. What started as a ministry to homeless men had expanded to serve homeless women. And then youth. And then the elderly. And then anyone who came, across the board. While one patient was be homeless by choice, or mentally ill, another had lost their home and assets in a divorce, and only recently come to find themselves disadvantaged.

Since 2003, St. Benedict Health and Healing Ministry has increased in volunteers, mission area and treatments. Offering services at no cost to the patient, the ministry is committed to being a faith-based voice that is non-denominational in outreach. They have 25 active volunteer healthcare professionals, including physicians, RNs and paramedics, as well as a cadre of non-healthcare professionals. In 2013, they provided 6000 medical services—a lofty amount, already surpassed; between January and October 2014, the ministry had served 7200 needs in their community. The need and desire to branch out and offer guidance to new ministries is strong, showing the depth of their commitment to the cause.

The values Mtr. Bowersox espouses are simultaneously modest and inspirational. Her mission, as she explains it, is to see the face of Christ in all of the patients. She finds listening to patients more important, in some regards, than giving a blood pressure check or a diabetic finger-stick--since many clients long for an understanding ear and calm face. Also integral are relationships based on dignity and compassion, between volunteers, patients, and the director.

Last year, St. Benedict Health and Healing Ministry saw a man whose vision had become impaired to the point of blindness. While their particular ministry did not have the resources on hand to treat the man, they partnered with five other Colorado non-profit agencies, as well as an exceptionally generous ophthalmologist. As in Christ’s fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy, the ministry had come to restore sight to the blind.

St. Benedict Health and Healing Ministry has very specific goals, the chief of which is, naturally, to heal those who are ill in body, mind and spirit. An institution and Jubilee Ministry of the Diocese of Colorado, St. Benedict’s is a point of