JUBILEE MINISTRY

Episcopal Jubilee Heinemeier

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

The Episcopal Church of El Buen Pastor, Durham, was accepted as a site for Jubilee Ministries in the fall of 2016. I developed the Jubilee Ministries proposal leading up to that acceptance.

 

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

I am a Lutheran Pastor, licensed to practice as a priest in the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. I serve as Interim Priest at The Episcopal Church of El Buen Pastor, Durham, NC.

To see more of the Diocese of North Carolina's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

Episcopal Jubilee Worship Good Shepherd

 

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

I have been working alongside the economically disadvantaged since my Ordination in 1963 in Brooklyn, N.Y. I have been deeply influenced by the gracious acceptance that my family and I have received in each of the congregations and local communities (Brooklyn, The South Bronx, Roxbury (Boston), East Baltimore, and, more recently, in the Episcopal congregations in Oxford and Durham, NC. I have been the main recipient in each of these ministries.

Episcopal Jubilee Gracious Congregations

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy means to speak up for someone. It is not yet releasing that person's innate power to speak up for him or herself. In other words, advocacy falls short of organizing and training people to act powerfully and collectively for themselves. That is why I have been involved in advocacy over the years, but also in faith-based organizing for the past forty years.

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus? (Written by Ingrid Nunez, a leader at El Buen Pastor) One of the ways I have seen Jesus in my ministry is when leaders of our congregation joined hundreds of other leaders, in the Durham CAN Action on Sunday, March 5, 2017. At that action, no matter what religion or race or nationality, immigrants and refugees and Muslims and many allies came together as one to fight for their dignity and security. Jesus, the defender of all people, was in the middle of that action.

Episcopal Jubilee Garden

 

The Rev. John Heinemeier is the interim priest at La Iglesia Episcopal El Buen Pastor in the Diocese of North Carolina.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? The Episcopal Church of El Buen Pastor, Durham, was accepted as a site for Jubilee Ministries in the fall of 2016. I developed the Jubilee Ministries proposal

Annette Joseph Episcopal Jubilee

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

We applied for it on November 1, 2016, and were just notified of the recognition on February 15, 2017. This is something the parish has been involved in over its lifetime though since 1903.

 

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

I am the priest at Holy Cross, when I was hired the congregation wanted the priest more involved in the community.  We have had a Lenten Partnership in our community for over 20 years. This partnership has led Holy Cross Episcopal, Brown Chapel AME, First Presbyterian, St. Andrew ELCA, First United Methodist, Lively Stone, and Mount Calvary Powerhouse to create a Downtown Churches gathering and start to cross into a deeper understanding with one another.  We have started a worship mob. This worship experience closes down our partner congregations and we all go to worship at Brown Chapel AME or Holy Cross or St. Andrew ELCA depending on whose turn it is.  At some point in the service you should feel as though you have been to your own service.  The components of Word, Spirit, Communion, and Fellowship all fall into the liturgy with readers from one church, the opening being done by another, hearing testimonies from Lively Stone, and sharing communion with Episcopalians or Lutherans.  Because of this we have been able to talk with one another more deeply. Studying together about Dismantling Racism, having honest conversations, and trusting we are hearing one another. This has been a blessing of our communities reaching out to one another.

To see more of the Diocese of Missouri's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

 

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

I have learned what it means to listen with understanding and caring. Our church communities can extend out beyond our walls if we just try and put the effort in. Keeping Jesus at the center, knowing our differences don't separate or divide us, can lead us into deeper relationship.

Episcopal Jubilee Listening Hearing

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy means actively being there. If your feet aren't on the ground and we are not taking the time to pray and listen to our partners, we can end up seeing each other as the enemy.  When we take the time to foster relationship it opens a whole new window into advocating for what is really needed here in this place at this time.

Episcopal Advocacy Jubilee

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

I have seen Jesus in our colors. When we recognize that color helps us see clearly how others are treated differently, how we can make a difference by listening and learning of someone else's experiences and then the trust this builds between one another keeps Jesus present, among us all.

Episcopal Seeing Jesus Faces Other

 

The Rev. Annette Joseph is the rector of Holy Cross Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Missouri.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? We applied for it on November 1, 2016, and were just notified of the recognition on February 15, 2017. This is something the parish has been involved in over its

Jubilee Ministries Alabama Mudiam

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

We are new to Jubilee Ministries in 2017, but have been serving our community for nearly 30 years. St. Michael's Clinic is the only provider for the uninsured in West Anniston, the largest population of the uninsured in Calhoun County.

 

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

The role of St. Michael's Community Services, Inc. is to minister the love of Jesus through the provision of healthcare to those who otherwise have little or no access to services. The ministry is an outreach of The Church of St. Michael and All Angels. The focus of the work is to offer medical services to those without access, connect patients to needed resources, provide social services such as patient education, and to provide an organization to which concerned citizens can confidently invest in meeting the needs of those living with health disparities. Thousands of patients have been served in West Anniston and the surrounding communities of Calhoun County.

To see more of the Diocese of Alabama's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

Working alongside those struggling with poverty and health disparities has opened my eyes to the value of community resources. Working together with others in our community, we can alleviate the burden of poverty. I think poverty is an issue that can seem so overwhelming that we feel powerless to face it. But if those who seek to love and serve Jesus would turn their hearts toward the poor, collectively we can truly help our neighbors. Disparity in privilege should not dictate the allocation of resources.

Episcopal Jubilee Mudiam Poverty Ministries

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy is a fighting word to me. I do not mean to stir thoughts of violence, but rather of strongly held convictions that I feel compelled to address. One of the primary roles of St. Michael's Community Services, Inc. is to advocate for the needs of our patients. They need someone who understands the healthcare system and can navigate it in such a way as to meet their basic healthcare needs. Advocacy in our ministry often meets a persistent pursuit of locating resources to meet the needs of our patients.

Episcopal Jubilee St Michaels

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

We see Jesus in the faces of every patient. In the notable passage of Jesus in Matthew 25, when we serve the least of these, we have served Jesus. These faces are housecleaners, waitresses, those struggling with addiction, the undocumented worker, the ex-convict, the homeless, the mental health patient, and others who have been marginalized, who have fallen through the healthcare gaps in our community.

Episcopal Where I See Jesus

What a privilege it is to serve them. I am so grateful for the opportunity. Jesus can also be seen in the application of His commandments to us. In the performing of the acts that Christ has called us to perform, Christ then is portrayed to those we encounter. It is Outreach/Evangelism in its truest sense. Jesus is seen in our work.

 

Nanette Mudiam is the director of St. Michael's Medical Clinic in Anniston, Diocese of Alabama.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? We are new to Jubilee Ministries in 2017, but have been serving our community for nearly 30 years. St. Michael's Clinic is the only provider for the uninsured in

5 Questions Episcopal Jubilee Dana Jean

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

We applied for and were recognized as a Jubilee Ministry in November 2016 under my leadership as the director of outreach.

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

I lead our parish's outreach, the Hands & Feet Social Transformation Ministry.  Under the umbrella of our Hands & Feet Ministry, I coordinate the "help the helpers" side, in which we support other organizations that are serving our community and the independent initiatives of our parish such as our BlessMobile Ministry which is a relational ministry centered around breaking bread together with people living in less fortunate areas of our mission field.  The Hands & Feet Ministry serves the marginalized including those suffering from food insecurity, women facing domestic violence, children at risk, incarcerated juveniles, and the homeless.

Episcopal Poverty Jubilee Serving Jesus

At the diocese level, I have been asked to assess and consult on a partnership with a local produce ministry affiliated with another church in order to help parishes in our diocese join with that ministry and start serving fresh produce to the marginalized in their communities.  Since October, the produce ministry has been able to expand its reach to four more communities.

To see more of the Diocese of Dallas' important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

Everyday I ask myself how it is possible that I have been given such a gift as to serve the marginalized and economically disadvantaged.  My work gives me no choice but to confront my own unconscious judgments and to then explore and navigate them to more fully understand and minister to those in need as well as to those in my own congregation who may be held back by their own judgments as well.  Serving the disadvantaged pushes me deeper into ministry and closer to Christ's own heart.  It brings me tremendous joy as often as it causes me wrenching heartbreak as I develop relationships with those in need and those serving alongside me.

Episcopal Advocacy Jubilee Serving Poor

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy is an important part of the social transformation ministry we do at St. Andrew's. Walking alongside the marginalized and economically disadvantaged is essential, but it is not always "enough" when what we seek is to transform a community.  In that vein, advocacy, to me, means then that we must proactively engage with community leaders in governments, social service agencies, nonprofits and churches to bring to light the needs of the community.  We must say to the community leaders, "Here are the problems people are facing.  How can we join together to address the needs?" and then, saying to the people whose voices too often go unheard, "We see you and we are listening. How can we help?"

Jubilee Ministries commit to providing direct services to the economically disadvantaged while advocating alongside them. Want to learn more? Check out How to Become a Jubilee Ministry!

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

Just thinking of answering the question "where have you seen Jesus" makes my heart leap with joy.  I see Jesus in every act of service, big and small.  I have seen him at a baby shower for a homeless woman and then again when we helped move furniture into a home for that same woman.  I have seen him in the neonatal intensive care unit when I was unexpectedly asked to baptize a baby before he went in for his seventh surgery.  I see him weekly in the juvenile detention center where I mentor and at the homeless shelter where we pack lunches for folks to take to work and school.

Children Jubilee Poverty Episcopal

Jesus joins us in the assembly line as we pack take-out containers of hot meals to serve to those suffering from food insecurity and he joins us in the local public school where we mentor and feed kids and care for the teachers and staff who serve so passionately.  He walks with us as we enter the home of a battered woman to help her escape the violence she and her children suffer and he walks with us as we move furniture into apartments for refugees just arriving from around the world. Jesus is all around us!  I want to shout from the mountaintop:  Come meet him!

Dana Jean is the leader of the Hands & Feet Social Transformation Ministry at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Dallas.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? We applied for and were recognized as a Jubilee Ministry in November 2016 under my leadership as the director of outreach. 2) What is/are your role(s) in your

5 Questions Episcopal Jubilee Dianne Aid

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

I have been involved with Jubilee Ministries since 1991, first as Coordinator of a Jubilee Ministry in the Diocese of Spokane. In 2003 our parish, St. Matthew/San Mateo, Auburn, in the Diocese of Olympia became a Jubilee Center. We set out to serve and partner with the growing immigrant community, mostly from Mexico. I have been blessed to be the coordinator of this work. What started as an afterschool program to assist children from non-English speaking families has become what the community has defined. Today we advocate for Comprehensive Immigration reform and have been leaders in The New Sanctuary Movement. We provide space and opportunities for indigenous immigrants from Mexico to reconnect with pre-conquest cultural heritage (currently with Mixecta and Purepecha communities). We are on the horizon of industrializing our parish hall kitchen to create opportunities for the development of micro businesses.

I served on The Jubilee Advisory Committee from 2009-2012, and currently, I am assisting Diocesan Jubilee Officer in the Diocese of Olympia.

Interested in being designated a Jubilee Ministry? Check out How to Become a Jubilee Ministry on what the process entails!

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

In the Diocese of Olympia I work with Economic Justice, this work really is inter-faith serving on the Program Committee of the Faith Action Network.

Episcopal Jubilee Luke Passage In my parish, I coordinate the Jubilee Center which in addition to what is described in the first answer provides ongoing support and safety planning for Spanish-speaking victims of domestic violence and human trafficking. I also serve as the catechist in my congregation.

I am currently president of The Episcopal Network for Economic Justice and have recently been appointed to the Executive Council Economic Justice Loan Fund Committee.

I am a professed Third Order Franciscan and approach life and ministry grounded in Franciscan principles.

To see more of the Diocese of Olympia's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

The motto, "Not about us without us" has been a revelation. I live my life from a wheelchair (since 2001); this has brought some blessings because I became vulnerable. The communities which I set out to "help" from my place of white privilege have taken care of me. For whatever reason, or how I ventured down this path my days are spent among people who struggle to make ends meet (I myself am on a fixed income), who live in the shadow of possible family separation due to immigration status.

Episcopal Jubilee Power of CommunityThis on the surface seems bleak, but, what I have found is the power of community, the courage to march and testify for human rights, and most of all to be able to celebrate joys of life and live in the beauty of diversity.

Our entire congregation has engaged in advocacy, community, and celebration. We are at 50% immigrant head of household membership. There are no stepchildren, we together proclaim Jubilee.

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

"The Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight to the blind, to set the oppressed free and proclaim the year of the Lord's favor... And all eyes were fixed on him.”

From Luke 4:18-20

Advocacy requires moving beyond our comfort zones, hear stories, walk with oppressed and marginalized communities who fall victim to corporate greed, and step out of the way so "the other’s" voice is heard.

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

Every day, cada dia, in the streets, fields, gathering around the table, in the dances.Episcopal Jubilee Where Is Jesus

Finally, at night the comforting words of Compline put it all in perspective. God bids me rest and approach the new day with openness and expectation.

Dianne Aid, TSSF, is a Third Order Franciscan and an assisting Diocesan Jubilee Officer in the Diocese of Olympia.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? I have been involved with Jubilee Ministries since 1991, first as Coordinator of a Jubilee Ministry in the Diocese of Spokane. In 2003 our parish, St. Matthew/San

5 Questions Episcopal Jubilee Arizona

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

Bridging AZ Furniture Bank was fortunate to have The Rev. Mark Van Wassenhove, a Bridging Charter Board member, introduced us to Carmen Guererro.  We met with Carmen and received our Jubilee Ministry Certification September 12, 2006.

Episcopal Jubilee Domestic PovertyBridging AZ satisfies a need in the Phoenix Metropolitan area that had been unrealized.  It had always been up to agency case managers to procure beds and furniture for their clients once permanent housing was obtained.

We focus our attention and make comfort in the home a priority and our business. Our "niche" is that we provide these items to economically disadvantaged individuals and families through agency representatives (case workers).

Interested in being designated a Jubilee Ministry? Check out How to Become a Jubilee Ministry on what the process entails!

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

As founders of Bridging AZ, my husband Jim and I became interested in service ministry upon our completion of EFM.  Sometimes in our parish of St. Barnabas, we are referred to as "The couple who took that servant portion of EFM really, really seriously!" 

Episcopal Jubilee Education for Ministry

To see more of the Diocese of Arizona's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church, and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

 

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged? 

I have experienced change in my attitude by getting to know the issues our agency case managers face daily. Their knowledge has informed my ministry by helping me learn how critical it is to understand the importance of:

  1. Education
  2. Recognizing/addressing the signs of substance/alcohol abuse
  3. Self-esteem
  4. Healthy eating habits

These 4 items top the list of every case manager with whom I have spoken.

I think about people in terms of "What can I do, what should I do, what will I do?"

The Arizona Coalition to End Homelessness: Thank God for these boots on the ground here in our community who (among many other things) tirelessly strive to work with our legislature, making the lives of those with no voice heard.   

Southwest Behavioral & Health Service: Thank God for the case managers who day after day work with the developmentally and physically disabled to ensure each and every life is lived to its fullest potential.

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Episcopal Jubilee AdvocacyAdvocacy is having the guts to get up in the morning and fight for unpopular issues that are not politically safe or sexy, relentlessly doing so in front of our elected officials who turn their ears and eyes to those issues that are popular, politically safe and sexy.

 

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

When a parishioner once looked at Jim and I and said "Oh man, you guys look beat.  Let me take you to lunch!" Thank you, Jesus.

When a donor told me she didn't want Goodwill to sell her kitchen table. She wanted to give it to Bridging Arizona, knowing we would find a family who needed it.  This table had served her well, having used it every night as she studied to obtain her doctorate. She wanted it to go to a family in need as its job "wasn't finished yet!" Thank you, Jesus.

 

Donna Piscopo is the co-founder and co-director of Bridging AZ.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? Bridging AZ Furniture Bank was fortunate to have The Rev. Mark Van Wassenhove, a Bridging Charter Board member, introduced us to Carmen Guererro.  We met with

If you’re reading this, you’re probably wondering the process behind being designated a Jubilee Ministry in The Episcopal Church. The process, involving an application period, some discernment, and affirmation by the Executive Council, occurs two or three times each year, so it’s important to keep deadlines in mind.

Jubilee Episcopal Church LogoIn case you’re unfamiliar with the fantastic work of Jubilee Ministries, some background might be in order. This designation was created by the General Convention at New Orleans in 1982. The mandate of Jubilee Ministries, provided by 1982-A080, is to be a “ministry of joint discipleship in Christ with poor and oppressed people, wherever they are found, to meet basic human needs and to build a just society.” The Act of Convention notes, that this kind of ministry is at the heart of the mission of the church.

As of fall 2016, we are a network of over 600 ministries across The Episcopal Church, ministering with one another, sharing best practices, advocating, and providing direct services and goods to the economically disadvantaged in our diverse contexts. Each year, we have budgeted funds for Jubilee Grants to ministries that have achieved this designation, helping to support and share the work of particularly effective work in poverty relief.

So how can your ministry join this network?

1. First, check to see if you already are part of the network. Our page at the Episcopal Asset Map provides a comprehensive listing of our Jubilee sites. While you’re there, you might consider connecting with local ministries that have already achieved the designation, find new ideas for your own ministries, and tell the world about your community’s faith and work.

2. Next, find out if your church or ministry meets the requirements. As set forth by General Convention and the Executive Council, Jubilee Ministries must meet certain qualifications for designation. These are as follows:

  • The mission and ministry must be an Episcopal congregation, Episcopal cluster or an ecumenical cluster with Episcopal presence, and/or an agency with connections to The Episcopal Church.
  • The mission and ministry must be involved among and with poor and oppressed people wherever they are located.
  • The mission and ministry must be rooted in worship.
  • The mission and ministry must include several programs, including at least one human rights advocacy program and one human service program.
  • Additionally, ministries must be willing to demonstrate their operation for models, maintain “how-to” files, act as a resource center for other ministries, and be subject to review.

3. So you qualify? Great! Time to contact your diocese’s Jubilee Officer. While not every diocese has an appointed Jubilee Officer, the ones that do can be found here. We try to keep this list updated at all times, but consider calling your diocesan offices directly if you aren’t sure if the listing is accurate. If your diocese does not have a Jubilee Officer listed, please contact our office at csikkema@episcopalchurch.org for help in the process. It’s important, as we’ll note, to keep apprised of deadlines and your Jubilee Officer can be a great help with that.

4. Fill out the Jubilee Ministry Designation Application here. It will take some time, but don’t worry. Once you hit submit on the final page, you’ll be emailed a copy of the application and a signature sheet that must be endorsed by people in the ministry, including your Jubilee Officer (if one is appointed) and your Bishop.

5. Remember a paragraph ago when I mentioned that there’s a deadline to keep in mind? The Executive Council, who meet two or three times each year, review, and ultimately designate Jubilee Ministries, require time for application translation and review. In order to find out the next deadline for applications, please contact the Jubilee Office at csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. Remember, in order to be eligible for Jubilee Grants, a ministry must be affirmed by the Executive Council before the application period starts.

6. Wait until Executive Council meets and deliberates.

Episcopal Jubilee Ministries Certificate

7. Receive notification from the Jubilee Office on the results of Executive Council. Should your application be approved, your ministry will receive an embossed certificate, signed by the President of the House of Deputies and the Presiding Bishop.

8. Start connecting! In the days following Executive Council, your ministry will be added to the Asset Map and to our files. You’ll be eligible for Jubilee Grants and will be connected with folks also doing the amazing ministries around the whole Episcopal Church!

If you’re reading this, you’re probably wondering the process behind being designated a Jubilee Ministry in The Episcopal Church. The process, involving an application period, some discernment, and affirmation by the Executive Council, occurs two

Episcopal Jubilee Ministries - Five Questions with Barbi Click

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

I have been manager of Trinity Food Ministry at Trinity Church in the Central West End-St. Louis for three years. As I learned more about TFM, I learned that it became a Jubilee Center in 1993.

Curious as to what it was, I looked into the concept of Jubilee and the Episcopal Church. Learning about it, I took the information to Bishop Wayne Smith and after discussing it, he named me Diocesan Jubilee Officer for the Diocese of Missouri.

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

As of May 2016, I am the Diocesan Jubilee Officer for the diocese. I manage a food ministry that includes a food pantry with meal three days per week plus a Sunday Hot Lunch. 

Episcopal Jubilee Ministries - Changed by Love

We serve meals to 60 people throughout the week and an average of 85 on Sundays. In 2015, the Food Pantry served almost 9000 individuals. At this time, Trinity is the only Jubilee Center in the Diocese of Missouri.

As DJO, I am in conversation with two parishes regarding their ministries. I am hopeful that there are several other ministries within this diocese who meet the Jubilee criteria to qualify as Jubilee Centers.

Jubilee Ministries, created by an Act of the 1982 General Convention, are those ministries which provide direct services to and advocate on behalf of the economically disadvantaged. For more information on becoming a Jubilee Ministries, as well as the annual Jubilee Ministry Grant program, please click HERE.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

Episcopal Jubilee Ministries - No Fear of the Stranger

Every day, it is clearer to me that our only hope lies in community, in our relationships with one another. Sharing meals is a wonderful way to get to know one another. As long as we can meet at the table, our stories can be shared. Everyone has at least one story; some people have many stories; many of the stories are tragic. We learn to love in our compassion. I am changed by love.

I think that the number one thing that has changed is my fear factor. I am no longer afraid of meeting a stranger face to face, of reaching out my hand, of looking that person in the eye. I have found that when I do that, I earn respect and I offer respect. In that respect, dignity can be found. There is no room for fear in abundance.

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy means working with those who are underserved or disrespected,speaking out for those who do not have or do not think they have the voice to speak out against injustice, whatever that injustice might be. Whether it is by means of social media, preaching, teaching, rallies, writing to legislators, advocacy is action that can change unjust policy.

Interested in faith-based advocacy? Check out the Episcopal Public Policy Network, a grassroots network of Episcopalians across the country dedicated to carrying out the Baptismal Covenant call to "strive for justice and peace" through the active ministry of public policy advocacy.

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

I see Jesus in the abundance with which volunteers and donors support the Trinity Food Ministry. Episcopal Jubilee Ministries - Jesus with Every Handshake I see Jesus the faces of the people that we serve. I feel Jesus with every handshake, with every tear, with every smile or hug, with every I love you that is said in the course of each week.

Barbi Click is the Diocesan Jubilee Officer for the Diocese of Missouri.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? I have been manager of Trinity Food Ministry at Trinity Church in the Central West End-St. Louis for three years. As I learned more about TFM, I learned that it

St. Andrew's Children's Clinic Arizona Episcopal

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

I have been involved with St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, a Jubilee Ministry, since 2001. I had never heard of a Jubilee Ministry before then. The Reverend Ed Gustafson, then Executive Director of The Clinic, applied for Jubilee status a few years prior to that. He was quite proud of the status, and when I learned what the designation meant I was proud too. I am a volunteer with The Clinic.

To learn more about St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, visit www.standrewsclinic.org.

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

Currently, I serve as Publicity Coordinator at St. Andrew's Children's Clinic. In this volunteer position, I take photos at the monthly clinics, write a biannual newsletter, update the Clinic website on a regular basis, create special mailings, write press releases, facilitate tours by media, create exhibits, and anything else I can think of to promote the good work of The Clinic. I also give presentations about The Clinic when the Executive Director cannot, and I staff an annual exhibit at the Arizona Diocesan Convention. I organize and perform at an annual recital to benefit the Augmentative/Alternative Communication Department at The Clinic. This department works with children who have limited or no ability to speak. We have found that an iPad with special communication software in Spanish can give these children a voice. With the program, they can interact with others. They press icons, and the iPad speaks for them.

In my parish, I serve as an informal liaison between The Clinic and Church. I write a column about The Clinic for the parish newsletter.

Jubilee Ministry volunteers, executives, and clients come from a variety of contexts and work. Check out the breadth of our work at The Episcopal Asset Map.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

The mission of St. Andrew's Children's Clinic is to provide free, specialized medical care to children living in Mexico who cannot get the care or afford the care they need in their home country. Our patients include those with spina bifida, brittle bones disease, club foot, cerebral palsy, cleft palate/cleft lip, hearing loss, impaired or lost vision, nutritional deficiencies, speech difficulties, to name a few.

The love these parents show for their children is amazing. They work with their children during the month to do the therapies that are prescribed. They patiently care for their children who have physical difficulties. I have watched a father feed his cerebral palsied daughter for 45 minutes without once hurrying her. I have watched mothers carry children bigger than they are.

St. Andrew's Children's Clinic Episcopal JubileeI am always amazed at the patience of the families who travel many miles to get to our monthly clinic. Some have traveled just across the Border, but many have spent 4-15 hours just getting to The Clinic and this probably was by public transportation. Then, they walk across the Border where The Clinic transport takes them to St. Andrew's Episcopal Church where The Clinic is held. They wait in line until their number is called. This lets them into the waiting room where they might spend most of the day between appointments in the different departments. In all this time, they are patient; their children are well-behaved. They never fail to express their gratitude to the volunteers who provide the care their children need.

One of my most blessed happenings was when a child with Down syndrome and limited speech kissed me in thanks for the iPad which would give her a voice through special software programs. Another was watching tears roll down a mother's cheeks when her son heard with his hearing aids for the first time.

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy means speaking out for those who need our help. This is easy for me in regard to St. Andrew's Children's Clinic. Jesus said, "Suffer the little children to come unto me..." I see all the children at The Clinic as children of God who need our help. Because their need is so great, it is easy to advocate for them.

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

St. Andrew's Children's Clinic Episcopal Jubilee

Jesus is at work every clinic, guiding the hands of the medical personnel, soothing the children who are frightened when casts are sawed off, helping in the kitchen to prepare food for the patients and parents, helping volunteers entertain children in the Arts & Crafts area. He is in the faces of each patient. As the newsletter editor, I take many of the photos that are featured. I am always told that they are great and that people like the newsletter. I am not a professional photographer. Rather, I trust that Jesus will guide me in getting the photos that tell the Clinic's story. He never fails me.

 

Dr. Vicki Fitzsimmons is a volunteer with St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, a Jubilee Ministry in the Diocese of Arizona.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

 

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? I have been involved with St. Andrew's Children's Clinic, a Jubilee Ministry, since 2001. I had never heard of a Jubilee Ministry before then. The Reverend Ed

Jubilee Ministries Minnesota Five Questions

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

I am the Missioner on the Bishop's team and am the Jubilee Officer for the Episcopal Church in Minnesota. I learned about Jubilee when I was hired into the position. I have been doing this work for 15 months.

 

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

My title is Missioner for Community Engagement. I am responsible for connecting with our faith communities on work outside their church doors. I help link faith communities with the community. I also support volunteer training for faith communities and work with outreach committees.

Episcopal Advocacy Jubilee Ministries Prayer CircleI am the team member who coordinates our annual Mission Opportunity (which is a theme of mission work). I work with our commission for emergency preparedness. I am also a support person for ECMN's elected bodies.

I am the resident community organizer and, in that role, I teach a course for ECMN’s School for Formation, work one-on-one with faith communities on visioning and creating an action plan for mission.

To see more of the Episcopal Church in Minnesota's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church, and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

 

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

Prior to my work as a Missioner for ECMN, I worked for 10 years in the family homelessness arena of Minneapolis, managing family shelters and case-managing families (I have a bachelor's and master's of social work and a master's in public policy).

Episcopal Jubilee Ministries Children Eating In listening to the many stories of families in shelter, I learned about their life experiences that were different than mine. I learned about how the system does and does not actually work. These pieces led me to questions like: How does my faith play a role in addressing this? How can faith institutions do better in addressing these issues? How can we live each day in doing better to those on the margins?

These questions ground my work with faith communities and create a client-centered focus and empowerment model of working with people.

Empowering our brothers and sisters is an important part of our work. Collaborating with Episcopal Relief & Development, we worked to create Called to Transformation, an Asset-Based Community Development curriculum that hosts workshops across The Episcopal Church.

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy is about being a voice for others, but also working with those who do not know how to use their voice and helping them discover it.

Advocacy is about sharing information about issues and systems and helping people connect with those in power to share their perspective to create change for the better.

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

Many faith communities in Minnesota are moving outside their church doors and into the community. Recently, St. Luke's in Detroit Lakes, MN co-hosted an event in their community about 'Meeting our Muslim Neighbors' in an attempt to address the lack of education and national rhetoric against Islam and Muslims. At this event, there were people who were threatened by Islam and spoke against Muslims. But overall, the event created space for people to be in relationship. After the speakers and Q and A session, folks moved into the lobby and shared food and conversation. It is in these moments I saw Jesus. People taking down the walls of division and creating connection.

 

Episcopal Meeting Jesus Prayer MinnesotaThis is only one example, there are many more: a Hmong congregation discussing how to reach out to their economically disadvantaged community, our ESC site Circle of the Beloved where four young adults begin their year of service in north Minneapolis, a rural church in southern Minnesota teaching their youth group about growing vegetables and creating rain barrels, our northwest Mission Area Gathering where we discussed the Doctrine of Discovery and the hurt to our native communities, and during our state convention as our members were sharing their story with each other as we begin a focus on racial reconciliation.

 

Rachel Babbitt is the Diocesan Jubilee Officer for the Episcopal Church in Minnesota.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? I am the Missioner on the Bishop's team and am the Jubilee Officer for the Episcopal Church in Minnesota. I learned about Jubilee when I was hired into the

Pages