PRESIDENT OF THE HOUSE OF DEPUTIES

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings will host a May 16 webinar to discuss Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice.

The free webinar will be held Tuesday at 3 pm – 3:45 pm Eastern (2 pm Central/1 pm Mountain/noon Pacific/11 am Alaska/10 am Hawaii).

No registration is necessary. Additional discussions with different constituencies, including Spanish-speakers, will be held on later dates.

To join the webinar

Please click the link below to join the webinar:
https://zoom.us/j/956329163

Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll):  +16465588656,956329163# or +14086380968,956329163#

Or Telephone:
    Dial: +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)
    Webinar ID: 956 329 163
    International numbers available

There is no registration required in order to attend and view the webinar.

Setup for Use of Zoom
Unless you have used Zoom before, it is suggested that you prepare for the webinar beforehand by executing a first-time setup of Zoom software on the device that you will be using, as explained below.

Zoom will require you to enter an email address, and to have the Zoom browser plug-in (on a computer) or the Zoom application (on a mobile device) installed.   If you do not have the plug-in / application already installed, please do one of the following at any time before the webinar begins:

  • Click on the link above, and follow the sequence of prompts.
  • In your browser, access https://zoom.us/, click on Join a Meeting, enter the Meeting ID 956 329 163, and follow the sequence of prompts.

When you click on the link above to join the webinar on Tuesday, you will be connected without any further preparation.

Submitting Questions
When the webinar is running, the panelists will endeavor to respond to questions.  In the Zoom view that you will have as an Attendee, please refrain from using the Chat and Raise Hand functions, as neither can be monitored effectively. Instead, use the Q&A window to submit your questions, or send them via Email to webinar@episcopalchurch.org

The webinar will be available on-demand shortly after the webinar.

Resources

  • Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice is available here.
  • Becoming Beloved Community Summary here.
  • Racial Reconciliation here
  • Becoming Beloved Community: Introducing the Episcopal Church’s Long-Term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice here
  • Leaders call on Episcopalians to heal ‘pain of racial injustice, division’ here

More Info

For more information contact Heidi Kim, Staff Officer for Racial Reconciliation, hkim@episcopalchurch.org, 206-399-7771; the Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Evangelism, Reconciliation and Creation, sspellers@episcopalchurch.org, 212-716-6086; or the Rev. Charles “Chuck” Wynder, Staff Officer for Social Justice and Advocacy Engagement, cwynder@episcopalchurch.org, 646-584-8112.

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings will host a May 16 webinar to discuss Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing,

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings shared the following letter with the staff of the Episcopal Church on February 8.

 

Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ:

 

Earlier this week, we informed Executive Council that Bishop Stacy Sauls has filed a lawsuit against the corporation of the Episcopal Church, called the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS), and an unspecified number of unnamed defendants associated with the church. The suit concerns Bishop Sauls’ tenure as chief operating officer of the DFMS and his departure from that job.

As you may remember, Bishop Sauls served as chief operating officer from 2011 until December 2015, when he was placed on administrative leave. Bishop Sauls’ employment with the church ended in April 2016.

The Presiding Bishop, in consultation with legal counsel, tried his best to negotiate a severance with Bishop Sauls. We believe he made a good faith and compassionate offer, but that offer was not accepted. The Presiding Bishop, as a steward of church resources, felt that he could not go beyond that offer and explain it in good conscience to the church.

As officers of the church, we are not going to comment directly on pending litigation that involves the church. We have complete confidence in one another and in the staff, officers, and leaders of the Episcopal Church. We are united in our desire to resolve this suit as quickly and compassionately as possible, and we are committed to working together to create a church culture that follows the loving, liberating and life-giving way of Jesus.

 

Faithfully,

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop and Primate

 

The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings

President, House of Deputies

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings shared the following letter with the staff of the Episcopal Church on February 8.   Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ:   Earlier

The following are the opening remarks of the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, President of the House of Deputies of the Episcopal Church, at Executive Council meeting through October 22 in New Brunswick, NJ.

Opening Remarks
Executive Council
New Brunswick, New Jersey
October 20, 2016
The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings

Last month, at the kind invitation of the Presiding Bishop, I went to the House of Bishops meeting in Detroit. I am absolutely certain that when he invited me, he did not know that most of the people attending, including me, would be struck down with a norovirus. Almost certain, anyway.

While we were there, we held a session about the culture change initiative in the Episcopal Church. Many of you and many deputies were able to join by webcast, and, as Episcopal News Service reported, the meeting is believed to be the first time the House of Bishops and House of Deputies have met together outside of General Convention.

So just thinking about how to change the culture of the church to be more like the Jesus Movement is helping us make progress toward the kind of loving, life-giving, and liberating relationships that we know we need to cultivate. As I said during the joint meeting, people need to be invited into a system that encourages transparency, accountability, kindness, and embodies the values that we’ve been talking about. It’s going to take time. We can’t just say ‘Yeah, we’re going to be different.’ We actually have to be different, and people have to experience us being different, before they will believe that a change is taking place.

Since that meeting, I’ve been thinking about how to carry the progress we’ve made in creating the new Jesus Movement culture into preparations for General Convention. In my office, we talk about when a triennium “flips”—by that, we mean when people stop talking about feeling like it is “after the last General Convention” and start feeling like it is “before the next General Convention.” 

I think that this triennium is starting to flip, and I’d like to see if we can’t help it flip in a new way.

One of the struggles that we’ve had in recent years is a popular conception in some quarters that mission and governance stand in opposition to one another. It’s a mindset based in scarcity thinking:  if we spend a dollar on governance, we’ll have a dollar less for mission. I am in favor of lean streamlined governance, but I’m also in favor of keeping our structures and relationships healthy so that we can do the work God calls us to do.

If you want an example of what that looks like, please look at the brave and faithful action now underway on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota where the Standing Rock Sioux are at the forefront of a movement to stop the Dakota Access pipeline and protect the quality of their water and their sacred lands. Two governance leaders, the Rev. John Floberg and the Rev. Brandon Mauai, are among the leaders of that movement. We have strong relationships in that part of the church through our longstanding involvement of governance leaders like my predecessor Bonnie Anderson and the involvement of previous presiding bishops at the Niobrara Convocation. Earlier this year, the Presiding Bishop and several key staff members visited Standing Rock and helped to draw attention to what local leaders were doing at a time when the mainstream media was not paying very close attention. Episcopal News Service spread the word of his visit, and the Episcopal Public Policy Network has urged the members of our church to educate themselves and to get involved. This is what the governance of the church can accomplish for mission through long-term relationships and wise use of its resources.

We’ve spent a lot of time in recent years focused on our governing structures, and what we’ve discovered, I think, is that culture eats structure for lunch every time. If we don’t pay attention to what we’re learning about the culture of the church, and concentrate on changing it to create a Jesus Movement culture across the church, we will never make meaningful structural change.

But if we can change our culture, it will free up the energy and power of Episcopalians in all orders of ministry to fulfill God’s mission for the Episcopal Church. It’s our culture and our collective energy that will lead us to create a healthy, life-giving, liberating structure that makes the best use of our resources as the people of God.

I didn’t think of this on my own. This way of thinking about the relationship of mission, structure, and energy is drawn from the work of Dr. Robert W. Terry, former director of the Reflective Leadership Center of the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota. His framework says that an organization accomplishes its mission by empowering resources to work through structures. It’s worth noting that he defines structure not only as the organization of an institution, but also the biases, prejudices, and preferences of the people within the structure that contribute to how power and resources are distributed to achieve the mission. That’s why culture can gobble up structure: no matter how flat or nimble or logical the org chart might be, if power and resources cannot flow freely to accomplish the mission, the structure is broken.

If you think about it this way, we made a big structural change in Salt Lake City, and I think it’s one that anticipates the Jesus Movement culture for which we’ve been longing. But I’m not entirely sure that we realized what we were doing. You’ll remember that we eliminated 12 of 14 standing commissions and created        a number of task forces that have programmatic responsibility. If we look at the church using Robert Terry’s model, we’d say that what we did was build a structure to support the widest distribution of power and energy, which means that people in the organization are able to use their gifts, skills, expertise, and passion as much as possible rather than having that expenditure of energy limited by inflexible or artificial structures.

As this triennium flips, I’m beginning to see that happen. A few weeks ago at a joint meeting of interim bodies in Chaska, Minnesota, I saw a number of groups working collaboratively and effectively to accomplish the mandates they were given by General Convention in 2015. People are finding creative ways to address challenges, to gather input from the wider church, and to seek the experience and wisdom they need from outside church structures when necessary.

I’ve seen staff, members of Executive Council, and people serving on interim bodies create working relationships that are strategic, visionary, and inclusive of one another’s ideas, hopes, and dreams.

I’ve seen ministries and departments such as Episcopal Migration Ministries looking creatively at new ways of working internally and on a churchwide level. 

The combination of Jesus Movement culture and a structure that supports wide distribution of energy is working for us, I think. I’m excited by this and the possibilities that it gives us. But it’s a little messy at times. We’ll have to live into it.

I’m also experiencing this new sense of possibility in the meetings that we corporate officers of the church are now having regularly with the presiding bishop’s canons. We’ve stopped seeing the relative structural independence of the officers as an obstacle to overcome, and we’re looking for ways for our group to maximize its gifts and expertise through shared decision-making and distributed executive authority. That’s our polity.

And, of course, I experience this same sense of possibility every weekend these days, when more dioceses elect new slates of deputies and I hear from them about their excitement to serve and their passion for the Episcopal Church. Every weekend, there’s new power and energy in the House of Deputies ready to bring about the Jesus Movement in the Episcopal Church, and I think that makes our structure something to celebrate.

Thank you for your energy, your passion, and love of the Episcopal Church and each other.

God bless you.

The following are the opening remarks of the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, President of the House of Deputies of the Episcopal Church, at Executive Council meeting through October 22 in New Brunswick, NJ. Opening Remarks Executive Council New Brunswick

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have written the following letter to the Episcopal Church.

June 28, 2016

Dear People of God in the Episcopal Church:

We all know that some things in holy Scripture can be confusing, hard to understand, or open to various ways of understanding. But some essential teachings are clear and incontrovertible. Jesus tells us to love God and love our neighbor as ourselves, and he tells us over and over again not to be afraid (Matthew 10:31, Mark 5:36, Luke 8:50, John 14:27).

There’s no confusion about what Jesus is telling us, but it often requires courage to embody it in the real world. Again and again, we become afraid, and mired in that fear, we turn against Jesus and one another.

This age-old cycle of fear and hatred plays out again and again in our broken world, in sickening and shocking events like the massacre targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in Orlando, but also in the rules we make and the laws we pass. Most recently, we’ve seen fear at work in North Carolina, a state dear to both of our hearts, where a law called the “Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act” has decimated the civil rights and God-given dignity of transgender people and, by extension, drastically curtailed protections against discrimination for women, people of color, and many others. We are thankful for the prayerful and pastoral public leadership of the North Carolina bishops on this law, which is known as House Bill 2.

North Carolina is not the only place where fear has gotten the better of us. Lawmakers in other jurisdictions have also threatened to introduce legislation that would have us believe that protecting the rights of transgender people—even a right as basic as going to the bathroom—somehow puts the rest of us at risk.

This is not the first time that the segregation of bathrooms and public facilities has been used to discriminate unjustly against minority groups. And just as in our painful racial past, it is even being claimed that the “bathroom bills,” as they are sometimes called, ensure the safety of women and children—the same reason so often given to justify Jim Crow racial segregation.

But we believe that, as the New Testament says, “perfect love casts out fear.” On June 10, the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church stood against fear and for God’s love by passing a resolution that reaffirms the Episcopal Church’s support of local, state and federal laws that prevent discrimination based on gender identity or gender expression and voices our opposition to all legislation that seeks to deny the God-given dignity, the legal equality, and the civil rights of transgender people.

The need is urgent, because laws like the one in North Carolina prey on some of the most vulnerable people in our communities—some of the very same people who were targeted in the Orlando attack. In a 2011 survey, 78 percent of transgender people said that they had been bullied or harassed in childhood; 41 percent said they had attempted suicide; 35 percent had been assaulted, and 12 percent had suffered a sexual assault. Almost half of transgender people who responded to the survey said they had suffered job discrimination, and almost a fifth had lost housing or been denied health care due to their gender identity or expression.

In keeping with Executive Council’s resolution, we are sending a letter to the governor and members of the North Carolina General Assembly calling on them to repeal the “Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act.” When legislation that discriminates against transgender people arises in other places, we will also voice our opposition and ask Episcopalians to join us. We will also support legislation, like a bill recently passed in the Massachusetts state legislature, that prevents discrimination of all kinds based on gender identity or gender expression.

As Christians, we bear a particular responsibility to speak out in these situations, because attempts to deny transgender people their dignity and humanity as children of God are too often being made in the name of God. This way of fear is not the way of Jesus Christ, and at these times, we have the opportunity to demonstrate our belief that Christianity is not a way of judgment, but a way of following Jesus in casting out fear.

In the face of the violence and injustice we see all around us, what can we do? We can start by choosing to get to know one another. TransEpiscopal, an organization of transgender Episcopalians and their allies, has posted on their website a video called “Voices of Witness:  Out of the Box” that can help you get to know some transgender Episcopalians and hear their stories. Integrity USA, which produced the video, and the Chicago Consultation are two other organizations working for the full inclusion of LGBT people in the church. Their websites also have online materials that you can use to learn more about the stories of transgender Christians and our church’s long journey to understand that they are children of God and created in God’s image.

When we are born anew through baptism, we promise to respect the dignity of every human being. Today, transgender people and, indeed, the entire LGBT community, need us to keep that promise. By doing so, we can bear witness to the world that Jesus has shown us another way—the way of love.

 

Faithfully,

 

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry                              The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings

Presiding Bishop and Primate                                 President, House of Deputies

 

  

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have written the following letter to the Episcopal Church. June 28, 2016 Dear People of God in the Episcopal Church: We

The following are the opening remarks of President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through June 10 at the Oak Ridge Hotel and Conference Center in Chaska, Minnesota. 

The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings
Opening Remarks
Executive Council
June 8, 2016

Good morning, and welcome to Chaska. It’s my second time visiting Chaska, and I love it here. Chaska’s mission is “to be the best small town in Minnesota,” and they’re well on their way as far as I’m concerned.

I am especially delighted to report to you that according to the Chaska Herald, the Chaska Curling Center, which opened at the beginning of 2016, has already far outpaced its membership goals. In just five months of operation, they have more than 1,100 members.

Obviously, the Episcopal Church can learn from Chaska, and from curling. If you want to know more about curling, my executive assistant, Betsey Bell, will be very glad to tell you all you want to know, as she is a fierce curling competitor.

I’ve been looking forward to this meeting for a while. The last big meeting I went to was the Anglican Consultative Council in Lusaka, Zambia, and although it was a fascinating and rewarding meeting, I ate many of my meals sitting next to a crocodile pond. So far, no reptiles  at this meeting. My ACC colleagues—Bishop Ian Douglas and Deputy Rosalie Ballentine—will hopefully join us at our next Executive Council meeting in September to give a full report on ACC, but I’m happy to talk with you informally while we’re here if you have questions—about the crocodiles and about anything else.

Besides the paucity of reptiles, I’ve been looking forward to this meeting because we are welcoming my friend and colleague Dr. Matthew Sheep. Tomorrow morning, he will present some of the most interesting research I’ve ever seen about the Episcopal Church.

You might remember that I talked about Matthew and his research at our first meeting of this triennium, last November at the Maritime Center. He and two other researchers have been studying the Episcopal Church’s identity since 2004, and their paper, titled “Elasticity and the Dialectic Tensions of Organizational Identity: How Can We Hold Together While We’re Pulling Apart?” was published in the Academy of Management Journal.

He’ll tell you more about it tomorrow, but here’s the spoiler:  they found that Episcopalians are pretty elastic. I know that this is not a surprise to any of you who have been stretching all year. And only a third of the triennium has passed!

I’ve been thinking about our denominational elasticity as I’ve been thinking about September 16, 2016, which will be the fortieth anniversary of General Convention’s vote to approve the ordination of women. My husband Albert and I were married on August 14 of that year. After taking our honeymoon and moving into a new apartment in Cambridge , Massachusetts for our last year in seminary, I made the first of many church governance-related requests to which my extraordinarily patient husband has agreed over the past four decades. “Honey, could you set up the apartment while I go to Minneapolis to see what will happen?” Which he did.

I remember sitting in the bleachers in the House of Deputies, holding my breath and waiting for President John Coburn to announce the results of the vote by orders on Resolution B005, which made the canons on ordination equally applicable to men and women. I was in my final year of seminary when that historic vote took place, and so I can appreciate how elastic the church has needed to be in the last two generations, and with what urgency the struggle for women’s equality in the church continues.

We won’t be together again before September 16, so I want to share with you some of my thoughts on gender equality in the Episcopal Church. Because I think this is an area in which we need to be really elastic now and into the next generation. At the generous invitation of Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves of the Diocese of El Camino Real, I shared some of these thoughts recently in a letter to the women clergy attending a conference titled “Leading Women.”

As I look back on our struggles for gender equality and look forward to what I pray will be a vital, sustainable future for our beloved church, I think those of us who are committed to gender equality need to be sure we are focused clearly on the church as it is today, not the church as it was on September 16, 1976. In particular, too often I hear us measuring gender equality in the church by counting how many educated, privileged women sit in positions of hierarchical authority. I fear that we may believe that the best the church can do for women is to be sure that more of us are bishops, deans, and cardinal rectors.

I don’t mean to minimize what some call the stained glass ceiling. As the first ordained woman to be elected president of the House of Deputies, I have some sense of the institutional barriers in the way of ordained women, whether they are baby boomers, GenXers, or Millennials. I have worked hard to help us move toward gender equality within the institutional church, and we’re not there yet. 

But defining gender equality only by measuring the status of educated, ordained women could lull us into believing that the church will be transformed primarily by women who succeed in systems built and shaped by patriarchal authority. And after thirty-seven years of ordained ministry, I’ve come to the conclusion that’s not how it works.

Politics, business, and, unfortunately, even the church provide ample evidence that simply having women in authority is no guarantee that institutions will be more just, more fair, or more Christlike. It isn’t enough to have women ascend to the top of the church’s systems. We must also change the systems that have promoted inequality for so long and continue to reinforce it for the vast majority of our sisters, lay and ordained. That means that when women are elected or chosen, our work has only just begun.

When we truly answer the call to gender equality, we will strive on behalf of all women in our churches and communities—women who struggle to find and afford quality childcare, women who are trapped in violent relationships or are enslaved by addiction and poverty, women who work long hours in poor conditions at low-wages to support their children, women who do not have access to adequate health care and birth control, women who lack documentation and live in fear of deportation. And especially now, when we have all become more aware of the terrible, life-threatening conditions in which our transgender sisters too often live, we have to be sure that our quest for women’s equality does not define gender identity in ways that exclude them or silence their voices.

All of us, regardless of our gender identity or expression, have been called to lead the church at a time of dramatic societal and institutional change. Even as we aspire to have women equally represented in institutional authority, we know that our real job is to dismantle the institutional structures that have for far too long kept the church from going into out the world to proclaim the Good News to everyone, especially our marginalized sisters of color and our sisters who live in poverty. If our quest for institutional parity prevents us from standing in the crowd alongside the woman who touched Jesus’ garment to be made well, then no number of women clergy or bishops will ever make us whole.

We can do this. We can do it because we have the strength and spirit of the sisters who began the struggle and the men who have accompanied them along the way and have gone before us. They were really, really elastic, and we can be too.

Thank you. I look forward to stretching together this week.

 

 

The following are the opening remarks of President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through June 10 at the Oak Ridge Hotel and Conference Center in Chaska,

The following is the sermon presented by the President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the opening Eucharist of the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through June 10 at the Oak Ridge Hotel and Conference Center in Chaska, Minnesota.  

 

Executive Council
June 8, 2016
The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings

 

In the Name of God. Amen.

Today we commemorate Roland Allen, the son of an Anglican priest who was orphaned at an early age. Allen followed in his father’s footsteps and was ordained a priest in 1893 and sent by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) to its mission in North China in 1895. I wonder if he went to Fresh Start before going halfway around the world just two years after he was ordained!

Allen had a difficult time of it by all accounts. Five years into his missionary service, he was preparing to lead a newly formed seminary in Peking for Chinese catechists when he was trapped by the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. Many foreigners were killed and their property seized. Allen, along with others, was rescued after which he returned to England. Allen returned to north China in 1902 and soon fell ill, forcing him to return, once again, to England. He became a parish priest but he resigned in 1907 as a protest against the requirement that a priest had to baptize any child whether or not the parents had any connection or commitment to the Church.  He never held another official position in the Church of England.

Charles Henry Long, former editor of Forward Movement, wrote that Allen, as a result of the crises of his early experience, was led to a radical reassessment of his own vocation as well as the theology and missionary methods of Western churches.

His critique of missionary methods formed the core of his teaching and writing until his death in Kenya in 1947. (Charles Henry Long, “Allen, Roland,” in Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, ed. Gerald H. Anderson (New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 1998), 12-13.))   

Roland Allen was rediscovered in the 1960s and his work was heralded as ahead of his time. Dr. Andrew R. H. Thompson, a young Anglican theologian at Sewanee, wrote that “Christians need an understanding of mission that integrates the Great Commission with respectful pluralism, and evangelism with concern for material well-being.”  That is going to be my new mantra.

Thompson writes that Roland Allen pointed the Anglican Church in that very direction by promoting a theology of mission that is contextual and recognizes that God is already present in every location - that missionaries do not bring God to anyone – God is already there. (Andrew R. H. Thompson, “Communities of the Spirit: The Missiology of Roland Allen in the Twenty-First Century,” in Edinburgh 2010: Mission Today and Tomorrow, ed. Kirsteen Kim and Andrew Anderson (London: Regnum Books International, 2011)

Allen called the church to put its trust in the Holy Spirit – that the Spirit will guide and direct new believers and new churches in ways that will glorify God and serve the local community. This requires missionaries – now more often called mission personnel – to avoid creating dependency and to trust that each local community inherently has what it needs in its own people, leadership, and resources to grow into the full stature of Christ.

This is a message for us today – we do not own the church or God. We do not know better than the people we serve – we may have more money, but that doesn’t make us smarter, or better, or holier, or wiser. The Spirit blows where it will and how it will. Sometimes we just need to get out of the way.

I want to close with a story Roland Allen told about a veteran missionary who came up to him one day after he had delivered his sermon.

The missionary introduced himself and said, "I was a medical missionary for many years in India. And I served in a region where there was progressive blindness. People were born with healthy vision, but there was something in that area that caused people to lose their sight as they matured."

But this missionary had developed a process which would arrest progressive blindness. So people came to him, and he performed his operation. They would leave realizing that they had been spared a life of blindness because of this missionary.

He said that they never said, "Thank you," because that phrase was not in their dialect. Instead, they spoke a word that meant, "I will tell your name." Wherever they went, they would tell the name of the missionary who had cured their blindness. They had received something so wonderful that they never forgot to eagerly proclaim it wherever they went.

I will tell your name. Whose name will you tell?

  • Whose name will you tell as a result of generosity, kindness, and mercy?
  • Whose name will you tell out of gratitude?
  • Whose name will you tell because you have been provided blessing in abundance?
  • Whose name will you tell because justice has been served?
  • Whose name will you tell because you have been brought out of darkness into light?
  • Whose name will you tell because you have experienced forgiveness and reconciliation?
  • Whose name will you tell because your life has been transformed and your very spirit resurrected?

Whose name will you tell?

I hope the name you tell is the name of Jesus and that his name is engraved in your heart, just as your name is engraved in the heart of God who loved you at the moment of your creation and loves you still. Now go change the world!

Amen.

 

The following is the sermon presented by the President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the opening Eucharist of the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through June 10 at the Oak Ridge Hotel and

[February 26, 2016] The following are the opening remarks of President of the House of Deputies http://houseofdeputies.org/ the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the Executive Council http://generalconvention.org/ec of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through February 28 at the American Airlines Training & Conference Center, Fort Worth, TX.

Opening Remarks
Executive Council
February 26, 2016

The last time we met, just over three months ago, I said some things. I said some things about standing on the threshold and about longing for change and about embracing our elastic identity.

I said—I looked this up to be sure—that “The world might swirl around us, but we know who we are, and we can stretch our identity to accommodate the changes we need to make.” And I said, “I’m pretty passionate about these huge changes fermenting below the surface of our common life.” “I’m feeling pretty elastic this triennium,” I said, “and I’m ready to get started.”

So, it’s entirely possible that this three-month roller coaster ride we’ve been on was a result of me tempting fate. I said that I was up for some huge changes and a chance to stretch, and apparently the universe heard me. We’ve certainly have had a chance to stretch since November, haven’t we?

First of all, I want to give abundant thanks to God and the doctors and nurses and physical therapists and occupational therapists and Sharon Curry and everyone else responsible for our presiding bishop’s swift return to health after his little mishap. Michael, we are so grateful for your swift and sure recovery and the calm reassurance you gave us, with able assistance from Michael Hunn, all the way along.

Second, I want to commend you all, and especially the staff members here with us and those at home, for the grace and forbearance you have shown during the ongoing investigation into matters that led to three staff members being placed on administrative leave. I’ve been very fortunate to be with staff at several meetings recently, and I am grateful for the considerate ways that you are working with each other and with volunteer leaders of the church to advance our common mission. Thank you for standing on the threshold with such courage.

And third, I want to thank you, Michael, for the wisdom and steadiness with which you guided us all through the recent primates meeting and its aftermath. While confusion reigned and rumors swirled, you helped us understand, to renew, that we are still full members of the Anglican Communion, that our mission relationships with Anglicans across the world are strong, and that what binds us together is far stronger than what threatens to separate us. I will take your spirit with me when I travel to Zambia in April as the Episcopal Church’s clergy representative to the Anglican Consultative Council, where you can be assured that I will participate fully with a glad heart, a strong spirit and pride that the Episcopal Church fully affirms the dignity and worth of all of God’s children, including our lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender sisters and brothers.

Now, the roller coaster has come to a stop and the full moon is over, and in the next few days together, we’ve got some work to do to bring about those huge changes that we’ve been talking about. Thanks to many of you who have been working very hard since our last meeting, we will be ready at the end of this meeting to approve the budget for 2016 and, by doing so, take concrete steps toward remaking our commitment to evangelism, racial justice and reconciliation, and church planting, and toward supporting more effectively our Latino and Hispanic congregations.

Earlier this month, Bishop Michael and I were part of a meeting that included the officers of both houses of General Convention, several staff members, and several leaders from across the church. Our task was to begin to work on General Convention Resolution C019, titled “Establish Response to Systemic Racial Injustice.” For two days, we prayed, we told our stories to each other, and we reflected on the Episcopal Church’s efforts at racial reconciliation over the past several decades. We have much to be proud of, and much to be ashamed of, and a great deal of reason to change. You’ll hear more about that work tomorrow when Stephanie Spellers, our new canon for evangelism and reconciliation, facilitates a conversation about these initiatives.

I want to emphasize just one thing:  At that meeting, those of us gathered got really clear that the church’s work in racial justice and reconciliation is to play our part in creating the Beloved Community. That’s a phrase we’ve all heard around the church, but this hard, hard work of racial justice and reconciliation gives us a chance to dig deep in what it really means, and how a vision of the Beloved Community can transform us. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the person who first brought the term “Beloved Community” into popular use, and the King Center’s website provides some context for what he meant when he offered it to us not just as a vision, but as a very real goal:

“For Dr. King, The Beloved Community was not a lofty utopian goal to be confused with the rapturous image of the Peaceable Kingdom, in which lions and lambs coexist in idyllic harmony,” writes the King Center. “Rather, The Beloved Community was for him a realistic, achievable goal that could be attained by a critical mass of people committed to and trained in the philosophy and methods of nonviolence. Dr. King’s Beloved Community is a global vision, in which all people can share in the wealth of the earth.”

I’ve been thinking about the Beloved Community, and I know that many of you have been thinking about it even more and for longer than I have, although I will tell you that my senior thesis at Colgate University in 1974 was about the impact of Reinhold Niebuhr’s theology on the theology, witness, and ministry of Dr. King.

It almost certainly will have occurred to you, as it has to me, that this is going to take some work. The world we live in does not shower us with examples of practices that will help us to become the Beloved Community, and it does not reward generously attempts to cultivate it in our midst. We don’t entirely know how to begin, even here and now. Our own world here at Executive Council is not settled. We are unsure about the future. Some of us are fearful, some of us are wounded, and I suspect that all of us know that the institutional church that we have been elected to lead does not have all of the answers we need or all of the resources that are required. And I’m not just talking about money.

But God calls us to be the Beloved Community anyway. We’re called to listen to each other—in ways that maybe we’ve forgotten how to listen—and we’re called to act on our belief that the Beloved Community can be brought closer by the way we make decisions, by the way we spend money, by the way we extend trust to one another and practice forgiveness with one another. Even when—especially when—it is hard.

We don’t have the luxury of waiting until the roller coaster ride ends to make the changes we need to make.  Dr. King said this:  “In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late.” We have an enormous opportunity to be agents of justice and reconciliation. We had the mountaintop moments we needed to get going last summer at General Convention. And now we have the sacred responsibility to carry out that commitment into the everyday work of leading the Episcopal Church. And we should know going into this work, that it will not always come naturally and will surely be a growing edge, especially for those who have lived and enjoyed white privilege.

Listen to what Howard Thurman said about growing edges:

Look well to the growing edge. All around us worlds are dying and new worlds are being born; all around us life is dying and life is being born. The fruit ripens on the tree, the roots are silently at work in the darkness of the earth against a time when there shall be new leaves, fresh blossoms, green fruit. Such is the growing edge. It is the extra breath from the exhausted lung, the one more thing to try when all else has failed, the upward reach of life when weariness closes in upon all endeavor. This is the basis of hope in moments of despair, the incentive to carry on when times are out of joint and men and women have lost their reason, the source of confidence when worlds crash and dreams whiten into ash. Such is the growing edge incarnate. Look well to the growing edge.

I look forward to being edgy with you and count it an honor to work alongside you.

Thank you.

[February 26, 2016] The following are the opening remarks of President of the House of Deputies http://houseofdeputies.org/ the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the Executive Council http://generalconvention.org/ec of The Episcopal Church, currently

The following are the opening remarks of President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through November 18 in at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum Heights, MD.

The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings
President of the House of Deputies
Opening Remarks
Executive Council
November 15, 2015

 

Good morning.

This is a day I’ve been looking forward to since July 3. I’m delighted to be here with all of you who have agreed to serve our church as members of Executive Council, and especially with you, Michael. What a great start we have had.

This afternoon, according to our agenda, we’re going to have a chance to get to know each other, our passions and interests. So I’ll start.

After three years as president of the House of Deputies, I’m even more interested in how we in the Episcopal Church manage change. I’m really interested, as I told the people of the Diocese in Vermont last weekend at their convention, in how we figure out what God’s mission is for us today.

We used to be fairly certain, we Episcopalians, that we knew all about God’s mission. Some of us even thought that we were in charge of explaining it to everyone else. But,  as it turns out, as a Church, we need to do some remedial discernment work. We need to think again about God’s mission for The Episcopal Church in our time.

We did some great work together at General Convention, and as a result, we are clear about our work of racial reconciliation and evangelism. We’ve got a budget that is more aligned with our priorities than in the past, and we have a clear plan for the way that dioceses can participate in our common life by paying reasonable assessments. We’ve eliminated most of our standing commissions and created a lot of task forces, which we hope will make us more efficient—dare I say nimble?—and responsive. By the way, I can tell you that playing interim body musical chairs has not made the process of appointing people to serve more efficient, but I have high hopes that when we convene the meeting of Interim Bodies on Wednesday afternoon, the energy will be high and we’ll be ready to get to work.

Also, we’ve got a new presiding bishop that people seem pretty excited about. I’ve heard he can preach. And I can tell you that we have already developed an excellent working relationship and for that I am most grateful. Working together for the cause of Christ is what we are all called to do.

So, the stage is set this triennium for us to participate more clearly, more fully, more wholeheartedly in God’s mission for the Episcopal Church. 

We know some things about what God’s mission for us is not. It is not the model of a church building with a full-time priest that many of us knew when we were growing up. According to Dr. Matthew Price, vice president of research and data for the Church Pension Fund, 32% of congregations who had at least one priest in 2006 had experienced a decline in the number of clergy on staff by 2013, and of congregations that had one clergy person in 2006, 30% had no clergy person in 2013. So if the old model of a dedicated building with a full-time priest is required for us to do God’s mission, we’re in trouble.

We also need to let go of the idea that we need a lot of money do to God’s mission:  Between 2006 and 2013, congregations experienced a 7% decline in operating revenue, an 8% decline in pledge income, and an 11% decline in pledge cards. There was no decline in clergy compensation amounts, so that means a higher proportion of the church’s resources are being used to pay for clergy now than in the past. We know that’s not sustainable.

One of my favorite poets, John O’Donohue, wrote about the change we are now facing:

To change is one of the great dreams of every heart—to change the limitations, the sameness, the banality, or the pain. So often we look back on patterns of behavior, the kind of decisions we make repeatedly and that have failed to serve us well, and we aim for a new and more successful path or way of living. But change is difficult for us. So often we opt to continue the old pattern, rather than risking the dangers of difference. We are also often surprised by change that seems to arrive out of nowhere. We find ourselves crossing some new threshold we had never anticipated. Like spring secretly at work within the heart of winter, below the surface of our lives huge changes are in fermentation. We never suspect a thing. Then when the grip of some long-enduring winter mentality begins to loosen, we find ourselves vulnerable to a flourish of possibility and we are suddenly negotiating the challenge of a threshold.

 

“We find ourselves vulnerable to a flourish of possibility and we are suddenly negotiating the challenge of a threshold.”

Now, that sounds to me like a description of how we get even closer to God’s mission.

By any measure—demographic, financial, liturgical, spiritual—the Episcopal Church is negotiating the challenge of a threshold right now. There are at least two ways to think about this kind of change:

We can think about it as people who are the custodians of a once-grand institution that is charged with maintaining those buildings, that prayer book, that cultural and social status. If we think about crossing the threshold as guardians of the institution of the church, pretty much everything looks like loss and decline. It’s depressing to think about change in the church this way, and I don’t recommend it. And it doesn’t really seem like the path to discerning God’s mission.

So let’s think about it differently this triennium. We can also think about change—about standing on the threshold—as people who are secure in our identity as children of God in the Episcopal Church. The world might swirl around us, but we know who we are, and we can stretch our identity to accommodate the changes we need to make.

I have a wonderful friend and colleague, Matthew Sheep, a business professor at Illinois State University, who thinks that this ability to stretch our identity is the great strength of the Episcopal Church. For the past decade, he and two other researchers have been studying the Episcopal Church’s identity. They started their study in 2004, the year after Gene Robinson was elected bishop in New Hampshire. They’ve had their work accepted for publication in the Academy of Management Journal, which is just as impressive as it sounds. The title of the study is “Elasticity and the Dialectic Tensions of Organizational Identity: How Can We Hold Together While We’re Pulling Apart?”

Basically, Matthew and his colleagues found that we Episcopalians are pretty elastic. What exactly does that mean? In a recent interview with the news department at Illinois State University, he explained it this way:

People might be constructing (identity) when an expansion is going on, like for a merger or an acquisition or when there is a strategic change. So when you do that, there are members and leaders in your organization who will say, “Great. Welcome. Come on in. It’s a big tent. Let’s include everybody. Let’s include all of these identities. Our identity is elastic enough to accommodate all this.” There are others who will say, “That’s not who we have always been. That isn’t true to our roots. It isn’t true to who we have been in the past.” So they are constructing it in a more inelastic sort of way.

I am quite sure that any of you who have ever been to a vestry meeting, much less an Executive Council meeting, are familiar with these two schools of thought. I’m a big fan of the first one—the one where we say “Great. Welcome. Come on in. It’s a big tent. Let’s include everybody.” I am a fan of this approach to Episcopal identity not just because my friend Matthew studied it for ten years, but also because Jesus said that’s how we’re supposed to do it.

God knows who we are as the people of God in the Episcopal Church, and God knows it’s not about buildings or full-time clergy or social status or endowments. And because God knows those things, I believe God has a new mission for us. Just like John O’Donohue says, “Like spring secretly at work within the heart of winter, below the surface of our lives huge changes are in fermentation.”

I’m pretty passionate about these huge changes fermenting below the surface of our common life, and I’m excited about the prospect of working with all of you to help lead our beloved church through these changes. I’m feeling pretty elastic this triennium, and I’m ready to get started.

As we do this work, I am struck by something I saw when I was in Korea last month to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Anglican Church in Korea and attend the Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries International Consultation. There was a grand festival Eucharist in the Cathedral Church of St. Mary the Virgin and St. Nicholas in Seoul. At the front of the procession was the processional cross. What is usually at the end of the procession? (People responded by saying “The bishop.”) In Korea, and I was told this is their usual practice, the cross is carried in front of the procession, and there is another cross at the very back of the procession. Front and back – we are bookended by Christ. As we sang this morning, Christ in front of us, and Christ behind us. Thanks be to God!

Thank you.

The following are the opening remarks of President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings at the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, currently meeting through November 18 in at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum Heights, MD.

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have issued a letter calling on Episcopal congregations to participate in “Confession, Repentance, and Commitment to End Racism Sunday” on September 6.

 

The letter follows:

 

September 1, 2015
 
Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ:
 
On June 17, nine members of Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, were murdered by a white racist during their weekly bible study. Just a few days later at General Convention in Salt Lake City, we committed ourselves to stand in solidarity with the AME Church as they respond with acts of forgiveness, reconciliation, and justice (Resolution A302).
 
Now our sisters and brothers in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church have asked us to make that solidarity visible by participating in “Confession, Repentance, and Commitment to End Racism Sunday”  on Sunday, September 6. We ask all Episcopal congregations to join this ecumenical effort with prayer and action.
 
“Racism will not end with the passage of legislation alone; it will also require a change of heart and thinking,” writes AME Bishop Reginald T. Jackson. “This is an effort which the faith community must lead, and be the conscience of the nation. We will call upon every church, temple, mosque and faith communion to make their worship service on this Sunday a time to confess and repent for the sin and evil of racism, this includes ignoring, tolerating and accepting racism, and to make a commitment to end racism by the example of our lives and actions.”
 
The Episcopal Church, along with many ecumenical partners, will stand in solidarity with the AME Church this week in Washington D.C. at the “Liberty and Justice for All” event, which includes worship at Wesley AME Zion Church and various advocacy events.
 
Racial reconciliation through prayer, teaching, engagement and action is a top priority of the Episcopal Church in the upcoming triennium. Participating in “Confession, Repentance, and Commitment to End Racism Sunday” on September 6 is just one way that we Episcopalians can undertake this essential work. Our history as a church includes atrocities for which we must repent, saints who show us the way toward the realm of God, and structures that bear witness to unjust centuries of the evils of white privilege, systemic racism, and oppression that are not yet consigned to history. We are grateful for the companionship of the AME Church and other partners as we wrestle with our need to repent and be reconciled to one another and to the communities we serve.

“The Church understands and affirms that the call to pray and act for racial reconciliation is integral to our witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ and to our living into the demands of our Baptismal Covenant,” reads Resolution C019 of the 78th General Convention. May God bless us and forgive us as we pray and act with our partners this week and in the years to come. In the words of the prophet Isaiah appointed for Sunday, may we see the day when “waters shall break forth in the wilderness, and streams in the desert; the burning sand shall become a pool, and the thirsty ground springs of water.”
 
Faithfully,
The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church
 
The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings
President, House of Deputies of The Episcopal Church
 

Liturgical Resources

The AME Church has developed prayers for use on Sunday, September 6.
 
The ELCA has developed liturgical resources for “End Racism Sunday.” (click on the Liturgy tab).
 
These collects from the Book of Common Prayer may also be appropriate for use:
 
Almighty God, who created us in your image: Grant us grace fearlessly to contend against evil and to make no peace with oppression; and, that we may reverently use our freedom, help us to employ it in the maintenance of justice in our communities and among the nations, to the glory of your holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.
 

O God, the Father of all, whose Son commanded us to love our enemies: Lead them and us from prejudice to truth: deliver them and us from hatred, cruelty, and revenge; and in your good time enable us all to stand reconciled before you, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
 

Grant, O God, that your holy and life-giving Spirit may so move every human heart [and especially the hearts of the people of this land], that barriers which divide us may crumble, suspicions disappear, and hatreds cease; that our divisions being healed, we may live in justice and peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

 

The Episcopal Church: www.episcopalchurch.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/episcopalian

Twitter: www.twitter.com/iamepiscopalian

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have issued a letter calling on Episcopal congregations to participate in “Confession, Repentance, and Commitment to End Racism Sunday” on

“We don’t seek solutions whose only virtues are that they save us time, save us energy and save us money,” the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, President of the House of Deputies said in her sermon to the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church on June 26.  “We seek solutions that serve the kingdom.”

The following is the text of the sermon:

The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings
78th General Convention
June 26, 2015

 

In the Name of our Living, Loving, and Magnificent God!  Amen.
 

Our first two readings today speak of visions. They paint frightening pictures, even for those of us who look at them from a distance of almost two thousand years, in one instance, and more in the other. Isaiah gives us six winged creatures tending a sovereign the hem of whose garment—just the hem—fills a temple. John of Patmos tops that with his four living creatures whom an earlier passage tells us looked like a lion, an ox, an eagle and a human being, only with lots of wings. Which were covered with eyes.

Visions are a kind of language. They are the way writers help us glimpse truths that are beyond what any of us has seen or even imagined. Christians have resorted to visions throughout our history, and in its way, the language of vision is an admission that our minds can neither comprehend nor communicate the fullness of God’s majesty and mercy.

If you listen to the gospel closely—and you kind of have to listen to this Gospel closely—you will see that even Jesus has a hard time using language to speak about the nature of God. The sentences keep twisting back on each other: I am in you, you are in me, they are in us. Put these sentences in front of someone who hasn’t been listening to them their whole life and they’d have a hard time telling you what they mean.

His language is bursting at the seams. In a metaphor that probably has fresh relevance for you after your journey to Salt Lake City, the suitcase of human comprehension is not big enough for the concepts Jesus needs to stuff into it in this passage.

Throughout Christian history, mystics and visionaries, like John of Patmos, Hildegard of Bingen, and Julian of Norwich, have resorted to forbidding and ecstatic language to tell us about divine experiences that ordinary prose just can’t contain.

And yet, here is the thing about visions, as Joseph and Daniel and Ezekiel knew:  they have to be interpreted; they have to be rendered sensible to the people who credit their authenticity but who aren’t seeing them themselves.

It’s appropriate then, that these readings celebrate the feast of Isabel Florence Hapgood. She was among other things, a translator. We celebrate her for the 11-year project of translating the Service Book of the Holy-Orthodox Catholic Church into English. But she also gave readers of the English language Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy, a magnificent gift, although I expect my 16-year-old technology assistant, who has to write a paper on “Anna Karenina” by the middle of next month, doesn’t think so.

I’d like to think that each of us is involved every day in the act of translation, of living and speaking in ways that try to put an every day wardrobe on phenomenal beings with wings covered with eyes.

As Christians, it is our job to take the ecstatic, frightening, demanding dreams of our great prophets and seers, and make them sensible to the people around us.  It is our task to speak and act in ways that make it obvious what we believe and why we believe it. It is our task to give people some sense of the incredible power of the magnificent, living God whom we worship.

It may seem that there are few human enterprises further from visions of spectacular garments with hems that fill a temple of creatures with eyes on their wings than General Convention. I am not a digital native. I was born well before computers and online culture transformed the world and transformed the church, but I know what a mashup is and I’ve wondered what would happen if John of Patmos ran headlong into the House of Deputies. I think it might sound something like this: I saw the temple filled with deputies in shimmering raiment and a creature with six arms and a voting device in each one said, “I rise to a point of personal privilege during which I would also like to amend the amendment on the previous motion and immediately end debate and refer the resolution back to the parallel committee for further consideration.” And the Lamb, in a voice that caused all to tremble said, “Sit down deputy. You are out of order.”

But listen: ours is an incarnate faith. We believe that the Word takes flesh. Our faith is transformative. We believe that the Word having becomes flesh redeems the world. We do not believe in untethered visions, but we also don’t believe in reality untethered from vision.          

We don’t seek solutions whose only virtues are that they save us time, save us energy and save us money. We seek solutions that serve the kingdom.

The work of disciples is spinning the golden threads that tie the ecstatic vision of a loving, powerful God to your life, to mine and to the life of the church on earth. We weave these threads when we study scripture to understand the source of visions, when we delve into our history to learn about mystics and seers and the societies that produce them; when we act in ways that make it obvious that we are inspired by a God of breathtaking power and love, when we tend the sick, feed the hungry and advocate for the voiceless.

And we weave those threads between holy vision and ordinary life when we gather to order our common life, to discern what God is calling us to do and how God is calling us to do it. It isn’t easy to spin these threads, and it isn’t necessarily exciting every minute. Reading resolutions, testifying in hearings, finding yourself frustrated because people are disagreeable, or conversely, finding yourself frustrated because people avoid conflict, is all part of bringing God’s vision to rest in the church. I ask you to count it all as blessing, to understand that the labor required to see and then serve a shared vision is holy work.

We will fall short. Visions exist because the God we serve can neither be fully understood nor perfectly served. And yet, and yet—to invoke another seer and another vision—if we wrestle this angel, it will bless us.

Amen.

 

The 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church is meeting through July 3 in Salt Lake City, UT (Diocese of Utah). The Episcopal Church’s General Convention is held every three years, and is the bicameral governing body of the Church. It comprises the House of Bishops, with upwards of 200 active and retired bishops, and the House of Deputies, with clergy and lay deputies elected from the 108 dioceses and three regional areas of the Church, at more than 800 members.

The video services of the daily Eucharist during General Convention 2015 have been produced by the Episcopal Diocese of Utah.

Watch on the Media Hub here

The Episcopal Church: www.episcopalchurch.org

General Convention: http://www.generalconvention.org/

Diocese of Utah: http://www.episcopal-ut.org/

Salt Palace Convention Center: http://www.visitsaltlake.com/salt-palace-convention-center/

 

#‎GC78

“We don’t seek solutions whose only virtues are that they save us time, save us energy and save us money,” the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, President of the House of Deputies said in her sermon to the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church on

Pages