Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Relations

The ecumenical movement is the Episcopal Church's response to Jesus' prayer for his disciples in John 17:21 "that they may all be one." The Office for Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Relations offers prayers for unity and participates in formal dialogues to nurture a spirit of understanding and respect, while collaborating actively in mission and ministry opportunities.



ACC Anglican Consultative Council
ACC Anglican Church of Canada
ACNA Anglican Church in North America
ACO Anglican Communion Office
AIC African Initiated Churches
ALERC Anglican-Lutheran European Regional Commission
ALIC Anglican Lutheran International Commission
ALICC Anglican-Lutheran International Coordinating Committee
ALJWG Anglican-Lutheran Joint Working Group
AME African Methodist Episcopal
AMEZ African Methodist Episcopal Zion
AOJDC Anglican-Orthodox Joint Doctrinal Commission
ARC-USA Anglican-Roman Catholic Consultation in the United States
BCP Book of Common Prayer (Anglican/Episcopal)
BEM Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry (1982)
BoD Book of Discipline (United Methodist)
CADEIO Catholic Association of Diocesan Ecumenical and Interreligious Officers
CCC Catechism of the Catholic Church
CCM Called to Common Mission
CCT Christian Churches Together
CCUN Church Center for the United Nations
CFO Commission on Faith and Order
CICARWS Commission on Inter-church Aid, Refugee and World Services
CME Christian Methodist Episcopal
CMEP Churches for Middle East Peace
CoB Council of Bishops
COCU Consultation on Church Union
CSWCC Conference of Secretaries of World Christian Communions
CUiC Churches Uniting in Christ
CWA Churchwide Assembly (ELCA)
CWS Church World Service
DEIO Diocesan Ecumenical and Interreligious Officer
EAD Ecumenical Advocacy Days
ECOSOC Economic and Social Council (United Nations)
ECUSA Episcopal Church in the United States of America
EDEIO Episcopal Diocesan Ecumenical and Interreligious Officers
EIR Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations
ELCA Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
ELCiC Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada
EUB Evangelical United Brethren
GA General Assembly (Presbyterian)
GC General Convention (Episcopal)
GC General Conference (United Methodist)
GEII Graymoor Ecumenical and Interreligious Institute
HoB House of Bishops
IARCCUM International Anglican-Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission
IASCUFO Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity Faith and Order
ICCC International Council of Community Churches
ICRC International Conference of Reformed Churches
IER Institute for Ecumenical Research (Strasbourg)
IKZ Internationale Kirchliche Zeitschrift
ILC International Lutheran Council
JDDJ Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification (1999)
JES Journal of Ecumenical Studies
JLRCSC Joint Lutheran-Roman Catholic Study Commission
JOOCC Joint Orthodox-Old Catholic Commission
JPC Justice, Peace and Creation
LARC Lutheran, Anglican, Roman Catholic
LARCUM Lutheran, Anglican, Roman Catholic, United Methodist
LBW Lutheran Book of Worship
LCF Leuenberg Church Fellowship
LCMS Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod
LECC Lutheran-Episcopal Coordinating Committee
LEIRN Lutheran Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Representatives Network
LMCC Lutheran-Moravian Coordinating Committee
LRCUSA Lutheran-Roman Catholic Dialogue in the United States
LWF Lutheran World Federation
MECC Moravian-Episcopal Coordinating Committee
MRCJC Methodist-Roman Catholic Joint Commission
NAAE North American Academy of Ecumenists
NAE National Association of Evangelicals
NALC North American Lutheran Church
NAPARC North American Presbyterian and Reformed Council
NCC National Council of Churches
NCCCUSA National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America
NEOA National Ecumenical Officers Association
NIFCON Network on Interfaith Concerns (Anglican)
NPC National Planning Committee (of the National Workshop)
NRPE National Religious Partnership for the Environment
NWCU National Workshop on Christian Unity
OAIC Organization of African Instituted Churches
OCA Orthodox Church in America
OCUIR Office of Christian Unity and Interreligious Relationships (United Methodist)
OGA Office of the General Assembly (Presbyterian)
PCA Presbyterian Church in America
PCID Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue
PCPCU Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity
PCS Porvoo Common Statement
PCUSA Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
PECUSA Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America
PWR Parliament of the World's Religions
RCA Reformed Church in America
RfP Religions for Peace
SBC Southern Baptist Convention
SCEIR Standing Commission on Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations (Episcopal)
SEIA  Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs (Roman Catholic)
SODEPAX Society, Development, and Peace (RC and WCC Joint Committee)
TCTCV The Church: Towards a Common Vision (2013)
TEC The Episcopal Church
TUMC The United Methodist Church
UCC United Church of Christ
UFO Unity Faith and Order
UMC United Methodist Church
UMEIT United Methodist Ecumenical and Interreligious Training
UNCSW United Nations Commission on the Status of Women
UNHCR United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
USCCB United States Conference of Catholic Bishops 
WCC World Council of Churches
WCRC World Communion of Reformed Churches
WEA World Evangelical Alliance
WMC World Methodist Council
WPCU Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
WRF World Reformed Fellowship
ACC Anglican Consultative Council ACC Anglican Church of Canada ACNA Anglican Church in North America ACO Anglican Communion Office AIC African Initiated Churches ALERC Anglican-Lutheran European Regional Commission ALIC Anglican Lutheran...

In response to numerous requests, the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, assisted by Dr. Lucinda Mosher's NeighborFaith Consultancy, is pleased to offer an annotated list of items (including some with links and downloads) answering FAQs on interfaith concerns. This list will grow. Please revisit it often!

Muhammad: Legacy of a Prophet. Unity Productions Foundation
A documentary produced in 2002 by Alex Kronemer and Michael Wolfe that depicts stepping-stones in the biography of the Prophet of Islam and the relevance of each in the lives of early 21st-century American Muslims. Although now fifteen years old, it is still a valuable tool for instruction and dialogue.

Omid Safi, Memories of Muhammad (HarperOne, 2009). 
Blending personal reflection with solid scholarship, this beautifully written book helps non-Muslim readers understand the Prophet of Islam as a complex historical figure and the connection Muslims have to him.  

Ingrid Mattson, The Story of the Qur’an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life, second edition. Wiley-Blackwell, 2013.
A well-known expert with a gift for storytelling offers comprehensive insight into what the Qur’an is, how it came to be, how Muslims learn it, and what it means in their lives.  

Amir Hussain, Oil and Water: Two Faiths, One God (CopperHouse, 2006).
An introduction to Islam written for Christian readers by a devout Muslim scholar with deep appreciation of Christianity. 

The Hadith of Gabriel
A traditional primer on the basics of Islam.

The Basmala
By Jonathan Homrighausen and Lucinda Mosher

In response to numerous requests, the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, assisted by Dr. Lucinda Mosher's NeighborFaith Consultancy, is pleased to offer an annotated list of items (including some with links and downloads) answering...

In response to numerous requests, the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, assisted by Dr. Lucinda Mosher's NeighborFaith Consultancy, is pleased to offer an annotated list of items (including some with links and downloads) answering FAQs on interfaith concerns. This list will grow. Please revisit it often!

 

Just as reading the Bible straight through (from Genesis 1:1 to the last verse of Revelation) is not the most fruitful approach for a newcomer to Christian scriptures, so it is with the Qur’an—Islam’s holy book. Although the Qur’an is much shorter than the Bible (it’s’ about the same length as the New Testament), it is not a “quick read”. The newcomer to it may be bewildered by its structure, which is quite different from that of the Bible. It helps to know that the Qur’an first appears in human history in a time and place very different from twenty-first century America, in a language very different from English—and that it is read by Muslims within the framework of diverse, complex traditions of interpretation.

So, where to begin? Here are some recommendations to Christians and other non-Muslims who wish to better understand the Qur’an and how Muslims read it.

Seyyed Hossein Nasr, et al., editors, The Study Qur’an (HarperOne, 2015).

The best one-volume Qur’an translation-commentary available in English, created by a team of diverse scholars (both Sunni and Shi‘a), with several helpful essays providing background and context. If you’ll have only one Qur’an translation in your library, start with this one. However, as is true also for Bible study, it is best to consult multiple translations. So, also highly recommended: M. A. S. Abdel Haleem, translator, The Qur’an: English Translation and Parallel Arabic Text (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Carl Ernst, How to Read the Qur’an: A New Guide, with Select Translations (University of North Carolina Press, 2011)

A distinguished professor of Islamic studies summarizes the latest research into the historical and literary dimensions of the Qur’an from a Western academic standpoint.

Mustansir Mir, Understanding the Islamic Scripture (Routledge, 2007)

Mir, a Pakistani-American Islamic scholar, gives in-depth exegesis of Qur’anic passages central to Islamic theology, ethics, and spirituality, rooted in traditional Islamic commentary.

Michael Birkel, Qur'an in Conversation (Baylor University Press, 2014)

Quaker scholar Birkel interviews various Islamic imams and scholars in the West, asking each to explain what one of their favorite Qur’anic passages means to them.

Michael Sells, Approaching the Qur’an: The Early Revelations, second edition (White Cloud Press, 2007)

A scholar of Arabic and Islamic literature, Sells translates the shortest and, by Islamic tradition, earliest surahs of the Qur’an, bringing a keen poet’s sensibility to his rendition and commentary on each of these surahs. Accompanying the book is an audio CD of Qur’an recitation.

Michael Lodahl, Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur’an Side by Side (Brazos Press, 2010)

Nazarene theologian Michael Lodahl reads Biblical and Qur’anic narratives side-by-side, elucidating theological nuances from the differences between stories of shared prophets such as Mary, Jesus, Noah, and Abraham.

Ingrid Mattson, The Story of the Qur'an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life, Second edition (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)

Mattson, a Canadian-born convert to and scholar of Islam, narrates the story of the Qur’an both in the life of Islam and the lives of individual Muslims.

Walter H. Wagner, Opening the Qur’an: Introducing Islam’s Holy Book (University of Notre Dame Press, 2008)

A beautifully-written (albeit lengthy), step-by-step guidebook by a Moravian scholar, aimed at the serious Christian reader seeking in-depth understanding of the Qur’an’s context and contents in a comparative mode.

Michael Ipgrave, ed., Scriptures in Dialogue: Christians and Muslims studying the Bible and the Qur’an together. Church House, 2004.

This short book both reports on the Building Bridges Seminar held in Qatar in 2003 and serves as a handbook for Christians and Muslims wishing to engage in dialogical scripture-study.

Koran by Heart (HBO documentary, 2013)

This documentary follows three children in an international Qur’an memorization and recitation competition, along the way providing an insight into the deep piety and complicated technique of Qur’an recitation.

 

In response to numerous requests, the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, assisted by Dr. Lucinda Mosher's NeighborFaith Consultancy, is pleased to offer an annotated list of items (including some with links and downloads) answering...
The Episcopal Church is an active participant—as a full member or supporter—in a number of ecumenical and interreligious networks and regular events. This page provides links to these groupings in alphabetical order.
Anglican Communion Network for Interfaith Concerns
http://nifcon.anglicancommunion.org/
Bread for the World
http://www.bread.org/
Christian Churches Together
http://christianchurchestogether.org/
Church World Service
http://cwsglobal.org/
Churches for Middle East Peace
http://www.cmep.org
Churches Uniting in Christ
http://churchesunitinginchrist.org
The Consultation on Common Texts
http://www.commontexts.org
The National Council of Churches
http://nationalcouncilofchurches.us/
National Religious Partnership for the Environment
http://www.nrpe.org
National Workshop on Christian Unity
http://nwcu.org/
Parliament of the World's Religions
https://parliamentofreligions.org/
Religions for Peace USA
http://www.rfpusa.org/
The World Council of Churches
https://www.oikoumene.org/
The Episcopal Church is an active participant—as a full member or supporter—in a number of ecumenical and interreligious networks and regular events. This page provides links to these groupings in alphabetical order. Anglican Communion Network for...

May 25-June 4, 2017

Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement which the Archbishop of Canterbury is inviting people around the world to join. The wave of prayer will start in May and run for 10 days between the Christian festivals of Ascension and Pentecost.

May 25-June 4, 2017 Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement which the Archbishop of Canterbury is inviting people around the world to join. The wave of prayer will start in May and run for 10 days between the Christian festivals of Ascension...

On Jan. 6, 2001, after 30 years of dialogue, the Episcopal Church and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, while maintaining their autonomy, agreed to come together to work for joint mission in the world and to allow clergy to move freely between the two churches.

On Jan. 6, 2001, after 30 years of dialogue, the Episcopal Church and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, while maintaining their autonomy, agreed to come together to work for joint mission in the world and to allow clergy to move freely...

The day’s events included first a common prayer in Lund Cathedral, led by Pope Francis and Lutheran World Federation President Munib Younan and General Secretary Martin Junge; the procession was led by a Salvadoran cross created for the occasion and involved women and men from every continent and many generations.

The Episcopal Church was invited to attend through our ecumenical partnerships with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in American and the Church of Sweden. The Rev. Margaret Rose, Deputy for Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, attended on behalf of Presiding Bishop Michael Curry. The liturgical celebration in Lund was followed in the afternoon with an event at the nearby Malmö sports arena and included a joint commitment between the Lutheran World Federation and Caritas International to work together to alleviate poverty and respond to refugees.

This event included music and testimonies around a large, illuminated floor cross. Anglican and other ecumenical partners from around the globe were represented in this diverse and marvelous gathering of confession, repentance and call to action.

Videos are available at www.lutheranworld.org; you might especially enjoy the press conference, which includes discussions of DotW and Eucharistic hospitality: https://vimeo.com/189685569.

The day’s events included first a common prayer in Lund Cathedral, led by Pope Francis and Lutheran World Federation President Munib Younan and General Secretary Martin Junge; the procession was led by a Salvadoran cross created for the occasion...

Episcopalians and United Methodists met in Chicago, Illinois for the fourth session of their Dialogue on Full Communion (26-28 October 2016). Committee members and staff from each church shared in conversation, meals, and prayer. 

In personal updates and sharing, committee members spoke of the deep polarization in our nation and of the poisonous political rhetoric in this election season. These divisions are not new and our churches are not exempt. We acknowledge that United Methodists and Episcopalians also participate in the divisiveness raging in our society.

Our current passion to draw closer together reflects our need for repentance in perpetuating such division and our commitment to live into the unity for which Christ prayed. 

Work at the meeting included completion of an informational document (FAQs). The dialogue committee brought a statement for full communion called “A Gift to the World: Co Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness,” nearer to completion. We noted numerous examples places where United Methodists and Episcopalians are already working in mission together, most recently in our ecumenical solidarity at the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation. 

Our efforts of working toward full communion have progressed over many years. We are convinced the time is now to move forward toward legislation and church wide engagement. “Why Now?” is the final question of our informational document. We quote it here as a mandate for our future work and our commitment to engage the wider church:

To a world torn by division, mistrust and fear, our witness of Full Communion is a beautiful sign of life and hope. After all, Jesus prayed for his disciples to be one as he and the Father are one, so that the world may know (John 17); Paul also reminds us that we are one Body (1 Corinthians 12). 

We are richly blessed by a sharing of resources, as we join forces in crucial mission endeavors and tackle ministry challenges together. We have been in conversations about communion for fifty years. The examples of shared ministry and Christian friendship over many more years are innumerable. In many places, interchangeability and flexibility in ministry are essential. There is in our culture an increasing cynicism about divisions among churches, and a lack of passion for and identity with denominational entities. When we labor for unity, our own identities are clarified and redeemed.

Naming our oneness in Christ will be the fulcrum that will energize new and creative ministries in our communities, and joint activism for the dawning of God’s justice in the world. In passionate outreach to the world, “two are better than one,” for they lift each other up—and with Christ at the heart of this communion we will discover “a threefold cord is not quickly broken” (Ecclesiastes 4:9, 12). 

Participants:
Bishop Frank Brookhart (Episcopal Co-chair)
Bishop Gregory Palmer (United Methodist Co-chair)
The Rev. Dr. Pamela Lightsey (United Methodist)
The Rev. Jordan Haynie Ware (Episcopal)
Dr. Deirdre Good (Episcopal)
The Rev. Dr. Robert J. Williams (United Methodist)
The Rev. Patricia Farris (United Methodist)
The Rev. Dr. Tom Ferguson (Episcopal)
Bishop Mary Ann Swenson (United Methodist)
The Rev. Dr. James Howell (United Methodist)
Bishop David Rice (Episcopal) 

Staff: Dr. Glen Alton Messer (United Methodist), Ms. Jeanette Nunez (United Methodist), the Rev. Margaret Rose (Episcopal) 

 
Episcopalians and United Methodists met in Chicago, Illinois for the fourth session of their Dialogue on Full Communion (26-28 October 2016). Committee members and staff from each church shared in conversation, meals, and prayer.  In personal...