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Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry presented the following sermon at a special liturgy at the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Port-A-Prince Haiti.

 

Sermon on the Occasion of the Liturgical Signing of Covenant of Reconciliation

 

The Episcopal Diocese of Haiti

Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry

Tuesday, May 23

 

"Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”"

Matthew 28:16-20

 

My brothers and sisters, I greet you, in the Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. I likewise bring you the greetings of your brothers and sisters in Christ who are, with you, the Episcopal Church, or, better yet, the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement.

I give our God thanks for you, for the faithful ministries of clergy and lay people here. For you the clergy of this diocese, for the people of the churches, parishes and missions, for all of the schools which educate new generations of children, for clinics and hospitals which care for the sick, for ministries like St. Vincent's School for the Handicapped, the Center for Agriculture of St. Barnabas, the Music School of Holy Trinity, for the ministries you and many share with groups like Episcopal Relief and Development, Fresh Ministries, Food for the Poor, Heifer International, Episcopal University of Haiti, and many, many more.

But I want to add a special word of thanks and thanksgiving to Almighty God. In the Sermon on the Mount, found in Matthew chapters 5-7, the Lord Jesus taught us that the way of love is often realized in our willingness to go the second mile, sometimes when it hurts. The way of love, Jesus taught us, is the way of the cross, willingness to sacrifice self-interest, and even self, for the good of others.  That is the way of Jesus. And he is our Lord! And we are his followers, his disciples.

And you,

the Reverend Clergy of this blessed Diocese,

you, the Standing Committee,

you, Chancellors and other clergy and lay leaders of the Church here,

and especially you, my beloved brother bishops,

Bishop Zache Duracin, Bishop Oge Beauvoir,

you in this Covenant have been willing to go the extra mile, as Jesus taught us.

For the good of the people, for the good of the nation and for the good of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti.

You have sacrificed self-interest for the good of all.

You have been willing to begin the hard and difficult work of healing.

You have been willing through this Covenant to open the way that leads to reconciliation.

 

I thank you. And to God be the glory!

It was on the cross, as he was dying, that our Lord Jesus forgave even those who had tortured and crucified him. "Father, forgive them. They know not what they do." Our beloved brother, Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa, has shown us that Jesus teaches us from the cross that forgiveness is the way to a new future. He says that without forgiveness there is no future.

Mutual forgiveness and repentance, healing and reconciliation are hard work and they often take time. Healing and reconciliation do not happen quickly. But it happens, if we are willing, to allow God’s grace to work in us, for God's grace is sufficient. God is able.

And through this Covenant we -- Bishop Duracin, Bishop Beauvoir, the Standing Committee, the Reverend Clergy, and I, as your Presiding Bishop -- all of us together, we take this step in which we each repent for any way we have hurt each other,  we take a step toward mutual forgiveness, a step toward God's healing, a step toward reconciliation through the blood of Jesus Christ on the cross. This I commit to do, and I pray and believe you join me in that.

Now we are not perfect. We will make mistakes along the way. But if we press on, following this way of Jesus, walking together, upholding each other, we will make it because God’s power, working in us can do more than we can ask or imagine.  And this world needs our witness.  People need to know the power of God to heal, to forgive, to reconcile and rebuild. People need to know the power of our faith as we press on toward the Kingdom of God.

As St. Paul said in Philippians.

Beloved, I do not consider that I have made it my own; but this one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the heavenly call of God in Christ Jesus. (Philippians 3:13-14)

 

So why does this matter? To Haiti? To the world? Pay attention to the roots, the source, the origin. The key is always there, in the roots.

I recently went on a pilgrimage to Ghana in West Africa. I've been to Ghana before, but I had not been to the slave camps, or to the castles where newly captured people, imprisoned and then boarded on ships for sale and slavery in the Americas and the Caribbean.

At the site of the slave camps, evidence of what happened there is still visible. Bowls for food chiseled in the rock, by the slaves, hundreds of years ago, are still there. Water wells dug in the ground, are still there. Burial grounds for those who died are still there. In the oral tradition of our ancestors who told the story of what happened there, passing the story down from generation to generation, you can see and hear the cries of our African forbearers, longing to breathe free.

And then there were the trees standing in the field surrounding the slave camps. People were tied to those trees at night. Those trees saw it all. Those trees, still there, are witnesses to what happened. Those trees, like the tree that became a cross, bear witness.

One of the trees, on which undoubtedly hundreds of enslaved people were tied had a root system underneath it, the likes of which I have never seen. The roots above the soil were large and thick. And you could see them digging down into the soil where the minerals and sources of life are to be found. The roots of the tree are the key to the life of the tree.

The prophet Jeremiah said it this way:

 

Blessed are those who trust in the Lord,

whose trust is the Lord.

They shall be like a tree planted by water,

sending out its roots by the stream.

It shall not fear when heat comes,

and its leaves shall stay green;

in the year of drought it is not anxious,

and it does not cease to bear fruit.

Jeremiah 17:7-8

 

The roots of that old African tree are the keys to its life. The roots of this Diocese will be the keys to its life and future. And the roots of this Diocese are in Jesus Christ who said:

"Abide in me as I abide in you. Just as the branch cannot bear fruit by itself unless it abides in the vine, neither can you unless you abide in me. I am the vine, you are the branches. Those who abide in me and I in them bear much fruit, because apart from me you can do nothing."

John 15:4-5

 

Jesus of Nazareth, crucified and risen from the dead, he is the root, he and his way are the keys to the future of the Diocese of Haiti and to the entire Episcopal Church.  Jesus is the root which anchors us when the storms of life threaten to tear us down.

So why does this work of reconciliation, this covenant, matter? It's all about that roots. The roots of that old African tree are the keys to its life. The roots of this Diocese will be the keys to its life and future.

When I met with the Bishop and Standing Committee last summer, we met in the conference room of Diocesan House. When I sat down in my seat I happened to look across the room. There, on the wall, was the famous portrait of Bishop James Theodore Holly, first Bishop of this Diocese.

When I saw that portrait it brought to mind a deep childhood memory. My father was an Episcopal priest. And like many priests of African descent in the Episcopal Church in those days, he had copies of the books of Father George Freeman Bragg, Jr.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries Dr. Bragg, the Rector of St. James' Baltimore, chronicled the history of sons and daughters of Africa in the Episcopal Church.

When I was a child I use to play in my father's study. And I remember thumbing through his books. One of the pictures and biographies was that picture of Bishop James Theodore Holly. I've been seeing that picture of him since I was a very little child. And he has long been a hero to me.

Still longer, Bishop Holly is a hero and saint here, now one of the saints and worthies on the official calendar of our Episcopal Church.  One whose witness to the strength of Jesus, and whose hope in a new future for the people of this beautiful island still nurtures the growth of this diocese and also the Episcopal Church itself.

Soon after Bishop Holly left the United States and moved here, 43 members of the group who immigrated with the Bishop died from yellow fever and malaria, including his wife and some of his children. But he and others stayed. Bishop Holly loved Haiti, and the government eventually made him a Haitian citizen. And he is buried here in Haiti.

At some point in his ministry Bishop Holly returned to the United States to raise funds and gather support in the wider Episcopal Church for the Church in Haiti. In one lecture he made the case for their continuing to financially support the work. The title of the lecture was, "A Vindication of the Capacity of the Negro Race for Self-Government, and Civilized Progress as Demonstrated by Historical Events of the Haitian Revolution."

He reminded his audience that under the leadership of Toussaint L’ Overture the people of Haiti, brought here as slaves had done something incredible. In the American Revolution, most of the American colonists had at least some semblance of freedom before the American Revolution. They were colonists, not slaves.  But the Haitian Revolution was a revolution of people who were slaves. And like the Hebrews under Moses in the Bible, they sought and won their freedom.

Bishop Holly said it this way:

The revolution in Haiti “is one of the noblest, grandest, and most justifiable outbursts against tyrannical oppression that is recorded on the pages of the world's history.

A race of almost dehumanized men -- made so by an oppressive slavery of three centuries -- arose from their slumber of ages, and redressed their own unparalleled wrongs with a terrible hand in the name of God and humanity."

"In the name of God and humanity." There in that voice, there in those words, there in the spirit of James Theodore Holly who lived for this Church and this land, there are the roots of this diocese.

The roots of this diocese are in Bishop Holly's fervent desire that the loving, liberating and life giving Gospel of Jesus Christ should be proclaimed among the descendants of Africa here in Haiti.

The roots of this Diocese are in Bishop Holly's passionate conviction that following the way of Jesus the Church here might help the people and nation of Haiti to rise up and to claim the high calling among the nations of the earth.

But ultimately the roots of this Diocese are in the one of whom Isaiah prophesied when he said:

"A shoot shall come out from the stump of Jesse, and a branch shall grow out of his roots." Isaiah 11:1

 The roots of this Diocese are in Jesus Christ who died, and was raised from the dead, by the loving power of our God, who the Bible says, makes all things new.

So, standing firm, rooted in the faith of Christ Jesus, let the Diocese of Haiti rise up and reach out anew! 

 

Rise up, reach out and go, make disciples of all nations.

Rise up, reach out and go, proclaiming the Good News of Jesus to all creation.

 

So keep on preaching the Gospel.

Keep on teaching the children.

Keep on healing the sick.

Keep on feeding the hungry.

Keep on loving the orphans.

Keep on standing with the poor.

 

And always remember, you do not do this alone. Your fellow Episcopalians stand with you.

For we are not simply the Episcopal Church. Together we are the Episcopal branch of the Jesus movement. And Jesus promised, “I will be with you always, even to the close of the age.

God love you. God bless you. And you keep the faith. Amen!

 

 

 

 

Praying together before the solemn Eucharist on Tuesday, May 23 in Port-au-Prince, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry (center), Bishop Jean Zache Duracin of Haiti (left), Bishop Suffragan Ogé Beauvoir (right), and members of the Diocesan Standing Committee ceremoniously signed a covenant that “seeks to address and resolve many of the issues of conflict that have been burdening the Diocese.” The Covenant, here, brings an end the pause on fundraising by the Episcopal Church and opens new possibilities for a united future as the Diocese prepares to elect its next Bishop Diocesan in 2018.  Presiding Bishop Curry previously shared letters and the Covenant with the Church. While the covenant has been in effect since April, the signing ceremony provided an opportunity for a public witness to this effort.

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry presented the following sermon at a special liturgy at the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Port-A-Prince Haiti.   Sermon on the Occasion of the Liturgical Signing of Covenant of
Tagged In: Black Ministries

The search committee for the Episcopal Church Missioner for Black Ministry has provided the following update on its work:

 

Update on the search for the new Missioner for Black Ministry

 

The work of the search committee to find the new Missioner for Black Ministry within the Episcopal Church has begun. Our goal is to reimagine this ministry to better serve the community given the complexities of its current status and its future possibilities. Most important is to choose an adaptive leader to fulfill this role.

A high-level timeline of our work over the next few months is as follows: the job description will be posted to the church and applications will be received between June 1 - July 15; the search committee will review applications between July 15 - 31, conduct interviews in August, and will recommend at least two finalists to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry by September 1.

Canon Annette Buchanan of the Diocese of New Jersey and Bishop Wendell Gibbs of Michigan will serve as Co-chairs of the committee.

Members of the search committee are:

  • The Rev. Jabriel Ballantine, Central Florida
  • The Rev. Debra Q. Bennett, Ohio
  • Lou Glosson, San Diego
  • The Rev. Canon Anthony Guillén, Episcopal Church’s Director of Ethnic Ministries
  • The Rev. Deacon April Alford-Harkey, Connecticut
  • Imani Jackson, Texas
  • Diane B. Pollard, New York
  • The Rev. Canon Dr. Angela Shepherd, facilitator, Maryland
  • The Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Evangelism Reconciliation and Creation  
  • The Rev. Dr. Sandye Wilson, Newark
  • The Rev. Charles Wynder, Jr., Episcopal Church Missioner for Social Justice and Advocacy Engagement

 

Please keep the search committee in your prayers.

 

For questions or comments contact Angeline Cabanban.

 

 

The search committee for the Episcopal Church Missioner for Black Ministry has provided the following update on its work:   Update on the search for the new Missioner for Black Ministry   The work of the search committee to find the new Missioner

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry and Registrar of General Convention, the Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe, have notified the Diocese of West Texas that Bishop-Elect Jennifer Brooke-Davidson has received the required majority of consents in the canonical consent process.

The Rev. Jennifer Brooke-Davidson was elected Bishop Suffragan on February 25.  Her ordination and consecration service is slated for July 29; Presiding Bishop Curry will officiate.

In Canon III.11.4 (b), Standing Committees, in consenting to the ordination and consecration, attest they are "fully sensible of how important it is that the Sacred Order and Office of a Bishop should not be unworthily conferred, and firmly persuaded that it is our duty to bear testimony on this solemn occasion without partiality, do, in the presence of Almighty God, testify that we know of no impediment on account of which the Reverend A.B. ought not to be ordained to that Holy Office. We do, moreover, jointly and severally declare that we believe the Reverend A.B. to have been duly and lawfully elected and to be of such sufficiency in learning, of such soundness in the Faith, and of such godly character as to be able to exercise the Office of a Bishop to the honor of God and the edifying of the Church, and to be a wholesome example to the flock of Christ."

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry and Registrar of General Convention, the Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe, have notified the Diocese of West Texas that Bishop-Elect Jennifer Brooke-Davidson has received the required

On Thursday, May 18, Thursdays at 2 features Presiding Bishop Michael Curry presenting For Such a Time as This: A Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy, calling for fasting on the 21st of each month through December 2018, at which time the 115th Congress will conclude. Presiding Bishop Curry joined Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) in issuing the joint statement located here

The video is available here  

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Our Lady of Guadalupe, Seattle WA
  • Episcopal Moment with Corey Brewer
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes
  • Bistro St. Michael’s
  • Episcopal Migration Ministries
  • Edible Churchyard
  • Transforming Churches - Trinity Church, Clanton, AL
  • Episcopal Revival
  • St. Gabriel's, Leesburg VA
  • Ecclesia Ministries Common Cathedral
  • Christ Church in Philadelphia, PA
  • YASCer in Tanzania
  • Two Tables
  • The Food Pantry at St. Gregory Nyssa in San Francisco, CA
  • @OurTable
  • Young Adult Service Corps
  • United Thank Offering at St. Paul's Senior Center
  • Amazing Grace
  • St. Thomas Choir School
  • Bridal designer Anne Barge
  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

 

For Such a Time as This: A Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy

On Thursday, May 18, Thursdays at 2 features Presiding Bishop Michael Curry presenting For Such a Time as This: A Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy, calling for fasting on the 21st of each month through December 2018, at which time the 115th

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have issued a joint statement calling for prayer, fasting and advocacy.

The statement, For Such a Time as This: A Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy, calls for fasting on the 21st of each month through December 2018, at which time the 115th Congress will conclude.

The 21st of each month is targeted because by that time each month, 90% of SNAP (formerly food stamp) benefits have been used, thereby causing the last week of the month as the hungry week in America.

The fast will launch with a group of national and local leaders doing a three-day fast together May 21-23. These leaders include Presiding Bishop Curry, Presiding Bishop Eaton, and leadership throughout the Episcopal Church.

#ForSuchATime

Video messages

A video by Presiding Bishop Curry is here

 A transcript of the video is located at the end.

A video by Presiding Bishop Eaton is here

Joint statement

The joint statement of Presiding Bishop Curry and Presiding Bishop Eaton is here:

 

“For Such a Time As This”

Joint Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy

We are coming together as leaders of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and the Episcopal Church to oppose deep cuts to programs that are vital to hungry people struggling with poverty. We make this call in anticipation of the May 21 Global Day of Prayer to End Famine. We highlight the importance of foreign assistance and humanitarian relief as members of the World Council of Churches.

We also make a call to pray, fast, and advocate not just on May 21, but throughout the 115th Congress. At the invitation of Bread for the World, we join with ecumenical partners and pledge to lead our congregations and ministries in fasting, prayer and advocacy, recognizing the need to engage our hearts, bodies, and communities together to combat poverty. As the call to prayer articulates,

 

“We fast to fortify our advocacy in solidarity with families who are struggling with hunger. We fast to be in solidarity with neighbors who suffer famine, who have been displaced, and who are vulnerable to conflict and climate change. We fast with immigrants who are trying to make a better future for their families and now face the risk of deportation. We fast in solidarity with families on SNAP, who often run out of food by the last week of the month.”

 

Domestically, Americans throughout the country are struggling with poverty, and many government-funded programs allow them to care for and feed their families. As we look overseas, we must acknowledge that foreign assistance and humanitarian relief can help to address regions confronting famine and food insecurity, including South Sudan, Somalia, Yemen, and Lake Chad Basin. We will challenge proposals to eliminate or defund proven anti-poverty programs, at home and abroad.

The story of Esther provides encouragement for our fasting, prayer and advocacy. Esther, a Jew, was the wife of the Persian king. When plans were made to slaughter all the Jews in the empire, Esther’s cousin Mordechai pleaded with her to go to the king and use her voice to advocate for them, even though this might place her life in danger. He urged her not to remain silent, as she may have been sent “for such a time as this.” Esther asked people to fast and pray with her for three days to fortify her advocacy before the king, resulting in saving the lives of her people.

God’s intention is the flourishing of all people and we are called to participate in God’s loving purpose by standing with our neighbor who struggle with poverty and hunger. Following the Circle of Protection ecumenical fast in 2011 to fortify the faith community in opposing cuts to vital anti-poverty programs, we may have also been prepared “for such a time as this”. We commit ourselves to and invite our members to one day of fasting every month to undergird our efforts to convince our members of Congress to protect poverty-focused programs.

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Episcopal Church

The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton, Presiding Bishop, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

 

When does the fast begin? An opening three-day fast begins on Sunday, May 21. We will continue by fasting on the 21st day of each month through the close of the 115th Congress at the end of 2018. We fast on the 21st of the month because that is the day when 90% of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits run out for families.

How do we fast? We are calling for prayer, fasting, and advocacy. Fasting is an effort to clear our bodies, our hearts, and our minds from the distractions around us so that we may be more present to God. Fasting from food is one option that many will choose. But we invite people to take on other disciplines of self-denial, such as fasting from technology, or particular habits, which will help them rely more fully on God.

These days of fasting should also be days of advocacy to oppose cuts to public programs that help hungry people living in poverty. Individuals or congregations who participate in the fast will receive updates, prayer and advocacy action opportunities by signing up for either the Episcopal Public Policy Network or ELCA Advocacy.

Prayer accompanies and undergirds the disciplines of fasting and advocacy. It roots our actions in our total reliance on God’s loving grace and mercy. Turning to God in prayer shapes our advocacy and informs our fasting, grounding our actions in God’s call to love and serve our neighbor.

 

 

Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message

The transcript of Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message follows:

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

 

“Beginning on May 21 to fast, to pray, and to love by advocating for our children.”

 

There is a wonderful book that was published some years ago titled Eat, Pray, Love. I want to invite you to fast, pray, and love by advocating for those who have no one to advocate for them.

On May 21, I am going to join with Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and many of our ecumenical friends, in fasting for the day, and beginning a fast on the 21st of every month, continuing until the end of the year 2018, when the 115th Congressional session comes to an end. 

Here is the reason for that fast: That time of the month, around the 21st of every month, is a very difficult time for people who are on public assistance and have received their assistance earlier in the month. So we will fast and pray, to pray that our government and our leaders will find a way to do what is just and kind and compassionate in the best of the American spirit.

But we will not only fast and pray. We are asking you to join with us in advocating in a variety of ways for the poor, for those who need public assistance for children who are the primary beneficiaries of most of the forms of assistance that our government provides. We are asking you to join with other Christians and other people of goodwill to help our government reflect the best of the American spirit by feeding the hungry, caring for our children, and making sure that everyone has the opportunities for life and liberty not only in our country, but in our world. 

There is a story in the Bible, in the Book of Esther in the Hebrew Scriptures. It is the story of the people of God who found themselves in some tough times, and there was a woman named Esther who rose up and accepted the challenge at some risk to herself. A challenge to save her people when they were in jeopardy. At a moment of decision when she was trying to decide whether or not she should enter into the work to save her people, someone named Mordecai sent her a word, and said, “Perhaps Esther, you have come to the kingdom for such a time as this.” 

Maybe we are Esther. Perhaps we in the Episcopal Church, perhaps we in the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, perhaps we who are Christians and people of faith and goodwill have come to the kingdom for such a time as this, to help our country make sure that no child goes to bed hungry. 

Eat, Pray, Love is a wonderful book but I want to invite you beginning on May 21 to fast, to pray, and to love by advocating for our children.

God love you, God bless you, and you keep the faith.

 

Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry

The Episcopal Church

 

 

Resources

Information about “For Such A Time As This” here

The Episcopal Public Policy Network here

ELCA Advocacy Network here

Bread for the World here

WCC Global Day of Prayer to End Famine resources here

#ForSuchATime

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have issued a joint statement calling for prayer, fasting and advocacy. The statement, For Such a Time as This

The Episcopal Church – United Methodist Dialogue group have prepared A Gift to the World: Co-Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness; The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church - A Proposal for Full Communion, the result of dialogue for a formal full-communion relationship.

In a recent letter, Bishop Frank Brookhart of Montana, Episcopal Church co-chair of the committee, with Bishop Gregory V. Palmer, the United Methodist Church, Ohio West Episcopal Area, offered, “The relationships formed over these years of dialogue, and the recognition that there are presently no theological impediments to unity, paved the way for this current draft proposal.” The entire letter is available here

A Gift to the World: Co-Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness; The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church - A Proposal for Full Communion, is located here 

In the coming months, opportunities for feedback, regional gatherings, and discussions will be slated.

Additional related information, including historical documents, is available here

The work of the Episcopal-United Methodist Dialogue is enabled by two General Convention resolutions here and here.

For more information contact the Rev. Margaret Rose, Episcopal Church Deputy for Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations.

Members

Members of the Episcopal-United Methodist Dialogue are:

Episcopal

Bishop C. Franklin Brookhart

Bishop David Rice

The Rev. Dr. Thomas Ferguson

The Rev. Dr. Deirdre Good

The Rev. Jordan M. Haynie Ware

The Rev.  Margaret R. Rose – Staff
 

United Methodist

Bishop Gregory Palmer

Reverend Patricia Farris

Reverend Dr. James Howell

Reverend Dr. Pamela Lightsey

Bishop Michael Watson

Reverend Dr. Robert J. Williams

Kyle Tau, PhD, MTS - staff

 

 

The Episcopal Church – United Methodist Dialogue group have prepared A Gift to the World: Co-Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness; The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church - A Proposal for Full Communion, the result of dialogue for a

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