Domestic Poverty

One of the ways the Episcopal Church addresses domestic poverty is through its Jubilee network, which consists of over 600 Jubilee Ministry Centers. These centers empower the poor and oppressed in their communities by providing direct services, such as food, shelter, and healthcare, and also by advocating for human rights.

Articles

January 15, 2009

Members of the United States Congress Washington D.C. 20510 Dear Member of Congress, The needs of our nation’s most vulnerable members become increasingly critical as job losses escalate and states face dwindling revenue. The economic...

September 24, 2008

Members of the United States CongressWashington D.C. 20510Dear Member of Congress,As members of the Interreligious Working Group on Domestic Human Needs, in devotion to our common religious traditions of justice and compassion, we urge...

Bulletin Inserts

More than 170 Episcopalians, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, House of Deputies...

Bulletin inserts for April 13 offer an outline of the work of Habitat for Humanity, featuring...

This week's bulletin inserts outline the work of Episcopal Appalachian Ministries, which serves...

Documents

In response to the pressing challenges of domestic poverty and related issues, the Presiding Bishop's Summit on Domestic Poverty was convened May 13-15, 2008.

[Mountain Echoes, Episcopal Appalachian Ministries, Summer 2008] The Rev. Theresa Kelley, Vice President, and Interim Executive Director Michael Maloney represented EAM at the Presiding Bishop’s Summit on Domestic Poverty. In her letter...

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We are un–housed and housed people called by God into Christian community and ministry for the purpose of transforming all our lives.  We bridge the resources of diverse congregations, living into God's preference for the poor.  We give voice to the voiceless, we respect the dignity of every human being, and we see the face of Christ in ourselves and others as we join in outside worship.

Videos

The Rev. Jimmy Bartz of Thad's in Santa Monica, CA talks about a monthly "modern-day foot washing" his congregation offers.

Eliza Marth represented the Diocese of North Carolina during “Advocacy to Challenge Domestic Poverty,” a May 12-14 conference to train young adults in the skills necessary to transform unjust structures of society, frame the issues of domestic poverty and to stand with and be advocates for the poor.

Marth is a caseworker at Samaritan Ministries of Greater Washington, a nonprofit organization started by 12 D.C.-area Episcopal churches. Here she talks about the importance of unemployment benefits.

Coreen Walsh represented the Diocese of San Diego during “Advocacy to Challenge Domestic Poverty,” a May 12-14 conference to train young adults in the skills necessary to transform unjust structures of society, frame the issues of domestic poverty and to stand with and be advocates for the poor.

Walsh works coordinating the farm, garden and agro-ecology program at Camp Stevens, an Episcopal Camp and Conference Center in Julian, California. Here she talks about food security and the importance of supplemental nutrition programs.

Graham Simpson represented the Diocese of Western Massachusetts during “Advocacy to Challenge Domestic Poverty,” a May 12-14 conference to train young adults in the skills necessary to transform unjust structures of society, frame the issues of domestic poverty and to stand with and be advocates for the poor.

Here he talks about his work with inmates in his local county jail and the importance of the Second Chance Act.

(05/13/14) Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer of the Episcopal Church, spoke during the opening of Advocacy to Challenge Domestic Poverty, a three-day gathering of 50 bishops and young adults from the eight domestic dioceses of the Episcopal Church. Sponsored by the church and Bishops Working for a Just World and made possible by a Constable Fund grant, the gathering seeks to train young adults to transform unjust structures of society and to stand with and be advocates for the poor.

Heidi Shott, canon for communications in the Diocese of Maine, talks about generational poverty, the high prevalence of domestic violence in her state and the diocese’s taking on restorative justice work.

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