Welcomes You

Today in History

On this day in 1838, Edwin Abbott Abbott, Church of England author and educator, was born in London.

On this day in 379, Basil the Great, early Eastern church father, died in Caesarea, Cappadocia, Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey).
On this day in 1945, Vedanayakam Samuel Azariah, the first Indian bishop of the Anglican Church in India, died.
On this day in 1731, John Darwall, composer, was baptized at Haughton, Staffordshire, England. Darwall was ap­point­ed Cur­ate and lat­er Vi­car of St. Mat­thew’s Par­ish in Wal­sall, and lived the rest of his life there.
On this day in 1649, William Marshall's engraving of Charles I of England as a Christian martyr was published in the Eikon Basilike [Royal Portrait] ten days after the king was beheaded by Parliament in the aftermath of the English Civil War.
On this day in 1791, Henry H. Milman, priest and hymnist, was born at Saint James, Westminster, London. He served as ca­non at West­min­ster and rec­tor at St. Mar­ga­ret’s, and, in 1849, dean of St. Paul’s.
On this day in 1604, King James I authorized an English Bible translation, which was completed in 1611.

On this day in 1685, Anglican bishop and philosopher George

Berkeley was born at his family home, Dysart Castle, near Thomastown, County Kilkenny, Ireland.
On this day in 1276 Pope Adrian V (Ottobuono Fieschi) died in Viterbo, Italy.  He was sent to England in 1265 by Pope Clement IV to mediate between Henry III of England and his barons, and to preach the Crusades; he remained there for several years as the papal legate, serving from 1265 to 1268.
On this day in 325, The First Council of Nicea closed. Nicaea's First Council was convened; in Nicaea in Bithynia (present-day İznik in Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I.
On this day in 1498, Pope Alexander VI commissioned Italian artist Michelangelo to carve the Pieta.
On this day i n 1658, Oliver Cromwell, leader of the Puritan Revolution, died.

On this day in 1349, Pope Clement VI condemned self-flagellation, speaking out against a veritable flagellation frenzy. The practice, first taught by the Benedictine monk Peter Damian in the mid-eleventh century, gained popularity during the thirteenth-century Black Death scare and continues today in isolated incidents.

On this day in 1910, the General Convention passed a resolution calling for a world conference with representatives from all the Christian churches "for the consideration of questions pertaining to the Faith and Order of the Church of Christ." The main mover behind this was Charles Henry Brent, an Episcopal bishop who served in the Philippines and Western New York, who earlier that year had attended the Edinburgh Missionary Conference and came away convinced that cooperation in the global mission field was not enough, but that Christians needed to understand one another better.
On March 11, 1989, Bishop Robert H. Johnson was consecrated bishop of the Diocese of Western North Carolina.

On February 11, 1989, Barbara Clementine Harris was consecrated as suffragan bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts, becoming the first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion.

On this day in 1978, over 400 bishops gathered from all over the Anglican Communion as the eleventh Lambeth Conference of Bishops of the Church began.

On this day in 1534, Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor of England, refused to take the oath to the English succession. One year later Henry VIII indicted him for treason and had him beheaded.

On this day in 1661, the Scottish Parliament passed the Rescissory Act, which repealed all church-state legislation created since 1633. The act restored the Anglican episcopacy to Scotland.

On this day in 1533, Thomas Cranmer was consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury. Cranmer granted Henry VIII's annulment ending his marriage to Catherine of Aragon.

On this day in 1999, Bishop Jim Ottley officially left his post as Anglican Observer at the United Nations.

On this day in 1263, Hugh of St. Cher, a Dominican friar who made the first significant concordance of the Bible, died.

On this day in 1985, The Anglican Communion was invited to be one of the consultants to the United Nations Economic and Social Council.

On this day in 337, the first Christian emperor of Rome, Constantine, died at age 47.

On this day in 1902, Alexander Hamilton Vinton was elected the first bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts.

On this day in 1997, Virginia Theological Seminary revised its policy on sexual behavior from a statement that explicitly forbade "sexual intercourse outside the bonds of marriage, adulterous relationships, and the practice of homosexuality."  By a vote of 31 to 3, the seminary's board of trustees adopted "A Call to a Holy Life," 

On this day in 1983, Alex D. Dickson Jr. was elected  the first bishop-elect  of the Episcopal Diocese of West Tennessee first annual convention.

On this day in 1893, Phillips Brooks, bishop of Massachusetts, abolitionist, and author of "O Little Town of Bethlehem," died.

On this day in 1841, John Henry Newman published Tract 90 (in a series began in 1833), an argument for a catholic interpretation of the Thirty-Nine Articles.

On this day in 1854, Thomas Fielding Scott was consecrated the first missionary bishop of the Oregon and Washington Territories.

On this day in 1645, Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud was beheaded.

On this day in 1649, England's King Charles I, a devout Anglican with Catholic sympathies who staunchly defended the "divine right of kings," was executed after being convicted of treason under a Puritan-influenced Parliament.

On this day in 1547, England's Henry VIII, who presided over the founding of the Anglican Church, died at age 55.

On this day in 1877, the first members of the Church Missionary Society arrived in Uganda. Though missions saw few immediate results, after the missionaries' deaths, the Ugandan church grew quickly.

On this day in 1976, the new Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf was formally established with the consecration of Leonard Ashton as its bishop. http://www.episcopalarchives.org/cgi-bin/ENS/ENSpress_release.pl?pr_number=76002
On this day in 1581, James Usher, Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625–1656, was born.
On this day in 1989, the House of Bishops consents to the election of Barbara C. Harris, first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion.
http://www.episcopalarchives.org/cgi-bin/ENS/ENSpress_release.pl?pr_number=89025A
On this day in 548, the Jerusalem church observes Christmas on this date for the last time as the Church moves to celebrating the birth of Jesus on December 25.

On this day in 1549, in the first of four Acts of Uniformity, the British Parliament required all Anglican public services to exclusively use of The Book of Common Prayer.

On this day in 1985, George Lazenby Reynolds was elected as the ninth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee.

On this day in 398, John Chrysostom was consecrated bishop of Constantinople.

On this day in 1455, renowned artist Fra Angelico died.

On this day in 1942, William Temple was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury. A renowned teacher and preacher, Temple is best known for his 1942 book Christianity and Social Order.

On this day in 1792, John Keble, English priest and hymnist, was born in Fairford, Gloucestershire.
 

On this day in 1559, The Act of Uniformity receives Queen Elizabeth I's royal assent, reinstating the forms of worship Henry VIII had ordered and mandating the use of the Book of Common Prayer (1552).

On this day in 1851, the first Episcopal Church was established in Oregon. The Rev. William Richmond and the Rev. Michael Fackler organized Trinity Parish in Portland.

On this day in 1985, the Rt. Rev. A. Donald Davies, bishop of the Diocese of Dallas from 1970-1982 and the first bishop of the Diocese of Fort Worth, became bishop for the Convocation of American Churches in Europe.

On this day in 597, Augustine, missionary to England and first Archbishop of Canterbury, baptized Saxon King Ethelbert, the first Christian English king.

On this day in 1888, Maxwell J. Blacker, Anglican priest and hymn translator, died in Westminster, England.

On this day in 1889, The Christian Social Union was founded. This organization within the Church of England addressed social injustice, which flourished in the latter part of the nineteenth century and continued into the early twentieth century. Through the work of "slum priests," it became attached to the Oxford Movement. Its leaders included Henry Scott Holland, dean of St. Pauls and, briefly William Temple, later Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this day in 1215, King John signed the Magna Carta, which begins, "The Church of England shall be free."

On this day in 1458, The College of Saint Mary Magdalene was founded at Oxford University in England by William of Waynflete, bishop of Winchester.

On this day in 1837, William Chatterton Dix, Anglican hymnist, was born in Bristol, England

On this day in 1893, Anglican novelist and playwright Dorothy Leigh Sayers is born in Oxford, England.

On this day in 2006, Katharine Jefferts Schori was elected 26th Presiding Bishop at the 75th General Convention.

On this day in 1701, King William III issued a charter establishing The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts an organisation able to send priests and schoolteachers to America "to help provide the church's ministry to the colonists." This organization is now known as USPG: Anglicans in World Mission.

On this day in 1993, members of the General Synod of the Scottish Episcopal Church (SEC) approved by a substantial margin the first stage of legislation to allow the ordination of women to the priesthood.

On this day in 1988, Presiding Bishop Edmond L. Browning established a new unit at the Church Center known as Refugee/Migration Ministries.

On this day in 1559, Queen Elizabeth's Book of Common Prayer was issued (a revision of Second Prayer Book of Edward VI).

On this day in 1535, Roman Catholic John Fisher was beheaded at the Tower of London. Fisher was the only bishop who did not sign a document that declared Henry VIII of England's marriage to Catherine of Aragon unlawful.

On this day in 1607, English settlers celebrated the first recorded Holy Communion at the Jamestown settlement in Virginia.

On this day in 1989, Newark Bishop John Shelby Spong inaugurated a new diocesan ministry, called Oasis, which focuses on the needs of gay and lesbian people.

On this day in 1983, Presiding Bishop John M. Allin designated St. Mark's Church in Lewistown, Pennsylvania the first Jubilee Center.

On this day in 1566, James VI of Scotland, who later became King James I of England, was born. He is famous for setting into motion a translation of the Bible known as the King James Version.

On this day in 1988, Frederick H. Borsch, former dean of the Church Divinity School of the Pacific (CDSP), was consecrated Bishop of Los Angeles.

On this day in 1643, The Westminster Assembly convened for the first time in London in the Henry VII Chapel of Westminster Abbey.  The assembly  was appointed by the Long Parliament and sought to restructure the Church of England.

On this day in 1814, Frederick W. Faber, English theologian, hymnist and member of the Oxford movement, was born in Yorkshire, England

On this day in 1491, Henry VIII of England was born in Greenwich Palace, London

On this day in 1299, Pope Boniface VIII, in his encyclical Scimus, fili, claimed Scotland owed allegiance to the Roman Catholic Church.

On this day in 1989, James E. Solheim began as News Director in the Department of Communication at the Episcopal Church Center.

On this day in 1982, A. Theodore Eastman was ordained and consecrated bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland at the Cathedral Church of Saints Peter and Paul.

On this day 1115, Bernard founded a monastery at Clairvaux, France, that would soon become the center of the Cistercian religious order.

On this day in 1829, the Diocese of Kentucky held its the first convention at Christ Church, Lexington.

On this day in 1220, Thomas Becket's shrine was dedicated in Canterbury and became a popular pilgrim attraction.

On this day in 1984, Bishop Robert C. Rusack of Los Angeles ordained Dr. Duc Xuan Nguyen as the first Vietnamese priest in the Anglican Communion.

On this day in 1824, Bishop William White laid the cornerstone for the original St. Mary's Church in Hamilton Village, Philadelphia - the Episcopal Church at Penn.

On this day in 1535, Sir Thomas More, who had recently resigned as Lord Chancellor of England, was executed for treason. He had sided with the pope against Henry VIII in the matter of the king's divorce. He was sentenced to be hanged, but Henry commuted the sentence to beheading.

On this day in 1835, Archbishop of Dublin and poet Richard C. Trench was ordained a priest.

On this day in 973, Ulrich, bishop of Augsburg from 923, died. Twenty years later he would become the first person canonized by a pope.

On this day in 1999, twenty-fifth Presiding Bishop Frank T. Griswold began his official visit to Russia and the Russian Orthodox Church.

On this day in 1489, Book of Common Prayer author and Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer was born at Aslockton, Nottinghamshire.

On this day in 1978, Cornelius Joshua Wilson, a priest of West Indian descent, was elected Bishop of Costa Rica on the first ballot at a special diocesan convention.

On this day in 1779, Clement C. Moore was born. He taught Green and Hebrew Literature at General Theological Seminary for 28 years. He also authored "A Visit from St. Nicholas" ('Twas the Night Before Christmas...) in 1823.

On this day in 1833, John Keble preached a landmark sermon at St. Mary's in Oxford and the Oxford Movement began in England.

On this day in 1857, "The Voice that Breathed O'er Eden" was written by John Keble, English priest and poet and a prominent leader of the Oxford movement.

On this day in 2000, the 73rd General Convention adopted the new name of Episcopal Relief and Development for the former Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Relief.

On this day in 1991, the 70th General Convention opened in Phoenix, Arizona.

On this day in 1974, Bishops, priests, women deacons and lay people meet in Philadelphia to plan an ordination for women.

On this day in 1863, Clement C. Moore died. He taught Green and Hebrew Literature at  General Theological Seminary  for 28 years. He also authored "A Visit from St. Nicholas" ('Twas the Night Before Christmas...) in 1823.

On this day in 1228, Archbishops of Canterbury Stephen Langton died.

On this day in 1986, Los Angeles Bishop Robert C. Rusack died.

On this day in 1997, Frank T. Griswold was elected the 25th presiding bishop by 214 bishops gathered at historic Christ Church in Philadelphia.

On this day in 2000, James L. Duncan, the first Bishop of Southeast Florida, died at The Floridean in Miami.

On this day in 1998, the Thirteenth Lambeth Conference began.

On this day in 1649, Edward Winslow, governor of the Plymouth Colony, helped organize the Society for Propagating the Gospel in New England.

On this day in 1323, Italian philosopher and Dominican theologian Thomas Aquinas was canonized.

On this day in 1996, David Hogan, a composer whose Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis Mt. St. Alban were commissioned for the consecration of Washington National Cathedral, was killed in the explosion of TWA flight 800 to Paris.

On this day in 1725, John Newton was born. Newton converted to Christianity while working on a slave ship and was ordained in 1764. His habit of penning one hymn per week yielded over 250 works including Amazing Grace.

On this day in 1997, the 72nd General Convention approved the new autonomous Anglican Province of Central America, which includes the Dioceses of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Panama.

On this day in 325, the Council of Nicea adjourned. The council issued the Nicean Creed and helped define Trinitarian thought along with the truth of Christ’s, fully divine and fully human, nature.

On this day in 1991, the House of Deputies of the 70th General Convention elected Pamela Chinnis of Washington, D.C., to be the first woman ever to sit as its president.

On this day in 1603, James VI of Scotland was crowned James I of England.

On this day in 1833, Britain's House of Commons banned slavery.  The House of Commons banned the slave trade in 1807. When William Wilberforce, who had spent most of his life crusading against slavery, heard the news, he said, "Thank God I have lived to witness [this] day." He died three days later.

On this day in 1869, England's Disestablishment Bill was passed, officially dissolving the Church of Ireland. It is from this act that we get the word "antidisestablishmentarianism," which was the organized opposition to the legislation.

On this day in 1901, B.F.  (Brooke Foss) Westcott, English New Testament textual scholar and Bishop of Durham, died.

On this day in 1789, William White became the first Presiding Bishop.

On this day in 1974, two retired and one resigned bishop ordained eleven women deacons to priesthood in Philadelphia's Church of the Advocate.

On this day in 1726, priest and Anglican Divine William Jones was born in Lowick, Northamptonshire.

On this day in 1714, the "Schism Bill," which intended to reestablish Roman Catholicism in England, died with its chief supporter, Queen Anne.

On this day in 1966, residents of Alabama burned Beatles' records and other products after John Lennon proclaimed the Beatles to be "more popular than Jesus."

On this day in 1827 William Blake, English poet and artist, died. Largely unrecognized during his lifetime, Blake's work is now considered a significant contribution to the history of both poetry and the visual arts.
On this day in 1890, John Henry Newman died. Newman was ordained an Anglican priest in 1824, he later helped lead the Oxford Movement, aiming to restore the Church of England to its high church principles. In 1843 he left the church and became a Roman Catholic.
On this day in 1855, F. J. (Frederick John) Foakes-Jackson, Anglican theologian, was born in Ipswich, England.

On this day in 1979, Presiding Bishop John M. Allin named Steve Charleston to be the Episcopal Church's staff officer for Indian ministries.

On this day in 1897, Bishop James Theodore Holly ordained P. Benjamin Isaac Wilson to serve the West Indians, and with this ordination the Anglican Church in the Dominican Republic was born.
On this day in 1831, F.W. (Frederic William) Farrar was born in Bombay, India. He became successively canon of Westminster and rector of St. Margaret's, archdeacon of Westminster and dean of Canterbury.
On this day in 1821, Edward H. Plumptre, English divine, priest and hymnist, was born in London, England. Plumptre is the author of the popular hymn, "Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart" (1865),
On this day in 1809, Alfred Lord Tennyson, English poet and Anglican, was born in Lincolnshire, England.
On this day in 1531, Thomas Bilney, early English Protestant reformer and preacher, was burned at the stake at Lollards Pit, Norwich.
On this day in 1853, A convention, called by missionary Bishop Jackson Kemper, formed the Episcopal Diocese of Iowa.
On this day in 1661, Thomas Fuller, priest and historian, died at his new lodgings in Covent Garden.
On this day in 1977, Presiding Bishop John M. Allin appointed Alfred Johnson Public Affairs Officer at the Episcopal Church Center.
On this day in 1727, William Croft, composer, died at Bath, England.  Croft served as organist of Westminster Abbey and composed works for the funeral of Queen Anne in 1714 and for the coronation of King George I the following year.
On this day in 1587, members of Sir Walter Raleigh's expedition to Roanoke baptized a Native American named Manteo, this was first recorded Anglican baptism in the American colonies.
On this day in 1980, a group of Episcopal women established the Women's History Project of the Episcopal Church at St. Bartholomew's Church in New York City..
On this day in 1948, The World Council of Churches was formally constituted in Amsterdam.
On this day in 1759, William Wilberforce, philanthropist and abolitionist, was born in Yorkshire, England.
On this day in 1662, the deadline arrived for all British ministers to publicly assent to the Book of Common Prayer (BCP). The Act of Uniformity, passed on May 19, 1662, also required the BCP to be used exclusively from this date forward. The act remains on Britain's Statute Book, though it has been modified over the years.
On this day in 1800, Edward B. Pusey, author of Tracts for the Times and a leader of the Oxford Movement to renew the Anglican Church, was born. He wrote several works promoting a union between Anglicans and Roman Catholics.
On this day in 1799, Alexander R. Reinagle, British church organist and composer, was born in Brighton, England.
On this day 1245, Alexander of Hales, English scholastic theologian, died in Paris.
On this day in 1965, civil rights worker Jonathan Myrick Daniels, a white Episcopal seminarian from New Hampshire, was shot and killed in Alabama.
On this day in 1908, Lewis H. Redne, organist and active Sunday school leader, died. He spent 19 years at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Philadelphia.
On this day in 1632, John Locke, English philosopher, Anglican, and author of The Reasonableness of Christianity, was born. He emphasized reason over the supernatural and argued that the essence of Christianity acknowledges Christ as the Messiah who came to our world primarily to spread the true knowledge of God.
On this day in AD30, according to tradition, John the Baptist was beheaded.
On this day in 1535, Pope Paul II excommunicated English King Henry VIII, who had been declared by an earlier pope as "Most Christian King" and "Defender of the Faith"
On this day in 1952, The Community of the Holy Spirit was formally instituted when the Sisters' vows were transferred from the Sisterhood of St. John the Divine.
On this day in 1752, Great Britain replaced the inaccurate calendar created by Julius Caesar in 46 BC with the Gregorian calendar.
On this day in 1525, Martin Luther published his defense against English King Henry VIII.
On this day in 1803, the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge was instituted in Boston. It was the first tract society to be formed in North America.
On this day in 1796, William H. Bathurst, Anglican priest and hymnist, was born near Bristol, England.
On this day in 1159, Adrian (or Hadrian) IV, the only English pope in history, died in Anagni, Italy.
On this day in 1845, Anglican priest John Henry Newman converted to Roman Catholicism. Newman had been a leading member of the Oxford Movement, which aimed to reform the Church of England.
On this day in 1783, Evangelical Anglican Robert Raikes formed the Sunday School Society to raise money for weekly Christian schools, which met each Sunday from 10:00 am until 5:00 pm—the original Sunday schools.
On this day in 1528, the visitation of the churches and pastors in Saxony was launched by Prince John the Constant, elector of Saxony, following guidelines published on March 2, 1528.
On this day in 1807, Robert Morrison, sent by the London Missionary Society, arrived in Canton and Macao, China, as the first Protestant missionary in China.
On this day in 1847, Anglican divine Henry Francis Lyte wrote "Abide with Me" on the evening of his last sermon and Holy Communion at Lower Brixham before going to France.
On this day in 1087, William I, "The Conqueror" of England in 1066 and founder of several monasteries, died.

On this day in 1833, Hannah More, Anglican philanthropist and devotional writer, died in Clifton, England and is buried at All Saints' Church, Wrington.
On this day in 1795, William White was consecrated the fourth Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church.
On this day in 1992, Bishop David Russell ordained the first women in the Church of the Province of Southern Africa (CPSA).
On this day in 1948, the first assembly of the World Council of Churches concluded in Amsterdam.
On this day in 1835, Anglican priest and biblical scholar Edwin Hatch was born in Derby, England. He is best known as the author of the paper "Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages Upon the Christian Church."

On this day in 1735, Robert Raikes, English newspaper editor, philanthropist and founder of the modern Sunday school, was born in Gloucester, England.

On this day in 1814, Francis Scott Key, an Episcopalian and cofounder of the American Sunday School Union, was inspired to write "The Star-Spangled Banner" during the bombardment of Fort McHenry during the war of 1812. The song became the national anthem in 1931.
On this day in 1847, Holy Eucharist was celebrated by an Anglican priest for the first time in Mexico.
On this day in 1903, Godfrey Thring, English priest and author of hymns such as "Lord, Dismiss Us with Thy Blessing" and verses of "Crown Him with Many Crowns", died in Surrey, England.

On this day in 1514, Thomas Wolsey was appointed Archbishop of York.

On this day in 1906, JB (John Bertram) Phillips, Anglican priest and translator of the New Testament in Modern English, was born.

On this day in 1976, the 65th General Convention of the Episcopal Church officially approved the ordination of women. This action allowed the official recognition of fifteen women previously ordained in Philadelphia and Washington. Three and a half months later Jacqueline Means of Indianapolis, Indiana, became the first woman ordained into the Episcopal Church after its official sanction.

On this day in 681, the Third Council of Constantinople adjourned, having settled the Monothelite controversy in the Eastern Church. The Council, which proclaimed the orthodox belief of two wills in Christ: divine and human, condemned the Monothelites, who believed Christ had only "one will," as heretics.

On this day in 1500, John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury, died in Knole House in Kent, England.

On this day in 1904, Frederick Whitfield, English priest and hymnist, died in London, England.

On this day in 1882, Edward B. Pusey, English Tractarian, died. Pusey was ordained into the Anglican Church in 1829, Pusey became a noted biblical scholar and leader of the Oxoford Movement.

On this day in 1997, Bishop Mark MacDonald was consecrated bishop of Alaska.

On this day in 1792, Samuel Provoost was consecrated the third Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church.

On this day in 1922, The House of Bishops of the Episcopal Church voted in favor of deleting the word "obey" from the marriage vows.

On this day in 1976, the 65th General Convention of the Episcopal Church began in Minneapolis/St. Paul.

On this day in 1937, Burnett Hillman Streeter, Anglican New Testament textual scholar, died.

On this day in 1871, Charlotte Elliott, Anglican hymnist, died at Brighton, England.  Elliot wrote nearly 150 hymns during her lifetime.
On this day in 1991, The Dead Sea Scrolls were made available to the public for the first time, by the Huntington Library.

On this day in 1993, Craig Anderson was installed as the eleventh dean of the General Theological Seminary (GTS) in New York.

On this day in 1571, John Jewel, bishop of Salisbury, died at the episcopal manor house of Monkton Farleigh. 
On this day in 1979, the Council of Anglican Provinces of Africa (CAPA) held its inaugural meeting at the Chilema Lay Training Center in Malawi.
On this day in 2004, G. Porter Taylor was consecrated sixth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina.
On this day in 1643, Gilbert Burnet, Scottish theologian and historian, and Bishop of Salisbury, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland.

On this day in 1852, Thomas Church Brownell became the seventh Presiding Bishop.

On this day in 1980, Willis Ryan Henton was invested as the first Bishop of the Western Diocese of Louisiana, now known as the Episcopal Diocese of Western Louisiana.

On this day in 1998, Rosemari Sullivan was appointed executive officer of General Convention.

On this day in 1981, Armando Roman Guerra was elected bishop of Guatemala.

On this day in 324, Constantine the Great decisively defeated Licinius in the Battle of Chrysopolis, establishing Constantine's sole control over the Roman Empire.

On this day in 1786, the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware completed a three-year process to become an independent diocese.

On this day in 1863, Frederick William Faber, priest and and hymnist, died.  Faber is known for the hymns "Faith of Our Fathers" and "There's a Wideness in God's Mercy."

On this day in 1636, Thomas Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Cottenham, Cambridgeshire.

On this day in 1907, the cornerstone was laid at the Washington National Cathedral.

On this day in 1782, the first complete English Bible known to be published in America was issued.

On this day in 1988, Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen in New York City served its millionth meal.

On this day in 1990, The Washington National Cathedral was completed.

On this day in 1742, Hugh Boulter, Archbishop of Armagh and the Primate of all Ireland, died. Boutler also served as the chaplain to George I.

On this day in 1947, The Church of South India was formed by the merger of three denominations: the Anglican Church (dioceses of Madras, Tinnevelly, Travancore and Chocin and Dornakal plus dioceses of the Church of India, Burma and Ceylon), the South India province of the Methodist Church and the South India United Church (formed originally by a 1908 union of Presbyterian and Congregational churches). The merger was the first union ever between episcopal (bishop-led) and non-episcopal (congregation-led) bodies.

On this day in 653, Honorius, Archbishop of Canterbury, died.

On this day in 1626, Lancelot Andrewes, bishop of Chichesterm died.  Andrewes held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I and oversaw the translation of the King James Version of the Bible.

On this day in 1643, The Solemn League and Covenant, drawn up by the Scottish General Assembly in London at Westminster Abbey, was submitted to the English Parliament.  This agreement guaranteed Presbyterians equal rights with Anglicans.

On this day in 1868, Henry H. Milman, priest, scholar and hymnist, died. Milman was buried in St Paul's Cathedral in London.

On this day in 1867, seventy-six bishops from all over the Anglican Communion met at Lambeth Palace for the first Lambeth Conference.

On this day in 1510, Rowland Taylor was born in Northumberland, England.  Taylor, an Anglican priest, was the third victim of Queen Mary I as she attempted to bring about Roman Catholic reforms in England. 

On this day in 1573, William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born in Readin, Berkshire.  Laud was a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right.

On this day in 1866, Daniel Tuttle was chosen as missionary bishop of Montana, Idaho and Utah.

On this day in 1902, Gregory Dix, Anglican Benedictine scholar and author of "The Shape of the Liturgy," was born at Woolwich, England.

On this day in 1921, Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1980–1991, was born in Great Crosby.

On this day in 1808, Allen Chatfield, priest and hymn translator, was born at Catteris (Cambridgeshire), England.

On this day in 1810, Henry Alford, priest and compiler of the first comprehensive English commentary on Greek New Testament, was born in London.

On this day in 1874, John E. Bode, priest and hymnist, died.

On this day in 1993, Robert Reed Shahan was consecrated bishop coadjutor of Arizona.

On this day in 1528, Richard Foxe died.  Foxe was successively Bishop of Exeter, Bath and Wells, Durham, and Winchester, Lord Privy Seal, and founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

On this day in 965, John XIII became pope.  He was one of the few popes to not change his name on his accession.

On this day in 1747, John Potter, Archbishop of Canterbury, died.
On this day in 1521, Pope Leo X (1475–1521) conferred the title of Fidei Defensor ("Defender of the Faith") on Henry VIII of England) as a reward for Henry's Defense of the Seven Sacraments, published in answer to Martin Luther's Babylonian Captivity.

On this day in 1896, Edward White Benson, Archbishop of Canterbury, died.

On this day in 1602, William Chillingworth was born in Oxford, England.
On this day in 1759, John Henley, commonly known as 'Orator Henley,' died.  Henley was one of the first entertainers and a precursor to the talk show hosts of today.
On this day in 1891, Phillips Brooks was consecrated bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts in Boston's Trinity Church.

On this day in 1882, Walter Russell Bowie, priest and theologian, was born in Richmond, Virginia.

On this day in 1845, English churchman John Henry Newman, leader of the Oxford Movement, made his celebrated conversion from Anglicanism to the Roman Catholic Church.

On this day in 1986, the House of Bishops in England agreed that a bishop of the Church of England should not exercise episcopal care over a priest and congregation situated in a diocese of another province except with the consent of the proper authorities of that province.

On this day in 1562, George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born in Guildford, England. His rise to leadership of the Anglican Church followed his defense of the hereditary monarchy and his efforts to combine the English and Scottish churches.

On this day in 1888, Leighton Coleman was installed as the fourth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware.

On this day in 1998, James B. Lemler was installed as eighth dean of Seabury-Western Seminary in Evanston, Illinois.

On this day in 1812, Henry Martyn, Anglican missionary and Bible translator in India, died in Tokat, Asia Minor.

On this day in 1881, William Temple, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born in Exeter, England.

On this day in 1877, the 32nd General Convention of the Episcopal Church concluded in Boston.

On this day in 1978, the complete New International Version of the Bible was published by Zondervan Publishers of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

On this day in 1990, Charles A. Perry was inaugurated as dean of Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California.

On this day 1958, Martin F. Shaw, English sacred music organist, died.

On this day in 1885, James R. Woodford, hymnist, died in Ely, Cambridgeshire, England.

On this day in 1704, John Locke, English philosopher, died in Essex, England.

On this day in 1865, the 28th General Convention of the Episcopal Church concluded in Philadelphia.

On this day in 1994, James Ottley of Panama assumed the role of Anglican observer at the United Nations.

On this day in 1990, the diocesan synod of the Anglican Diocese of Cape Town, South Africa, voted overwhelmingly in favor of the ordination of women to the priesthood.

On this day in 1993, Mary Adelia Mcleod was consecrated bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Vermont. Mcleod is the first woman elected to serve as head of a diocese in the Episcopal Church in the United States.

On this day in 1826, Timothy R. Matthews, priest and hymn writer, was born in Colmworth, England.

On this day in 1740, English priest Augustus Toplady, author of the hymn "Rock of Ages," was born.

On this day in 1907, Daniel C. Roberts, priest and hymnist, died in Concord, New Hampshire.

On this day in 1534, British Parliament passed the Supremacy Act, whereby Henry VIII and his successors to the English throne were declared "the only supreme head in earth of the Church of England."

On this day in 1980, the U.S. Postal Service issued a Christmas stamp based on a stained glass window in Washington National Cathedral.

On this day in 1807, Christopher Wordsworth, priest, scholar and hymnist, was born at Lambeth, England.

On this day in 1610, Richard Bancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury, died in London. 

On this day in 1164, Thomas a Becket, archbishop of Canterbury, left for France for a six-year exile after being condemned in royal court for "ingratitude" toward England's Henry II, who had once been his dear friend.

On this day in 1977, Oscar Clark Carr, Jr., a church and human rights leader died of cancer.

On this day in 1992, after a five-and-a-half hour debate the General Synod - the Church of England's parliament - passed controversial legislation to allow women to be priests by a margin of only two votes.

On this day in 1889, Edwin Hatch, Anglican Old Testament scholar, died in Oxford, England. Hatch was best known as the author of the paper "Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages Upon the Christian Church," which he presented during the 1888 Hibbert Lectures.

On this day in 1851, William Crosswell, priest and hymnist, died in Boston, Massachusetts.

On this day in 1874, James Theodore Holly became the first African-American bishop. He later went on to found the Anglican Church in Haiti.

On this day in 1840, George Hugh Bourne, priest and hymnist, was born at Saint Paul's Cray, Kent, England.

On this day in 1996, the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church met in a joint session with the Council of the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada in Toronto.

On this day in 1993, the 208th annual convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts adopted resolutions on blessings of same-sex unions and ordination of homosexuals.

On this day in 1836, Herbert Beaver, the first Anglican priest in Oregon, arrived at Ft. Vancouver.

On this day in 1874, Arthur Tozer Russell, hymn translator, died at Rectory of Southwick, near Brighton, England.

On this day in 1558, Elizabeth I's accession to the English throne led to the re-establishment of the Church of England.

On this day in 1976, the United Church of Lanka was inaugurated at a ceremony in Sri Lanka (formerly Ceylon). The church union involved the two Anglican dioceses in Sri Lanka -- Colombo and Kurunagala -- as well as the Methodist, Baptist, and Presbyterian Churches, and the Jaffna Diocese in Sri Lanka of the Church of South India.

On this day in 1731, William Cowper, British hymnist and poet, was born, in Hertfordshire, England.

On this day in 565, Roman Emperor Justinian died at age 82. During his reign, he reunited the Eastern and Western empires politically and religiously, erected several new basilicas in Constantinople, and created the Justinian Code, which greatly influenced the development of canon law in the Middle Ages.

On this day in 354, Augustine of Hippo, author of Confessions and City of God, was born in Thagaste.

On this day in 1701, the Carolina Assembly passed the Vestry Act of 1701, making the Church of England the official religion of the Carolina colony. Active opposition by Quakers and other religious Nonconformists who lived there ultimately convinced the proprietors of the colony to revoke the act in 1703.

On this day in 1877, William H. Bathurst, Anglican priest and hymnist, died at Lydney Park, England.

On this day 1992, the Anglican Church in Australia approved the ordination of women.

On this day in 1820, English poet and Oxford Movement leader John Keble wrote the words to the hymn "Sun of My Soul."

On this day in 1585, Thomas Tallis, composer, died in Greenwich, England.

On this day in 1900, Arthur S. Sullivan, English religious composer, died.

On this day in 1621, poet and priest John Donne was elected dean of Saint Paul's Cathedral in London.

On this day in 1860, George Croly, Anglican Divine and hymnist, died.

On this day in 1695, Henry Purcell, English organist and composer of church music, died at Dean's Yard, Westminster.

On this day in 1847, Henry Francis Lyte, Anglican Divine and hymnist, died at Nice, France.

On this day in 1900, Samuel J. Stone, Anglican priest and hymnist, died in Charterhouse, Somerset, England.

On this day in 1697, Saint Paul's Cathedral in London, designed by Christopher Wren, was dedicated.

On this day in 1898, C.S. Lewis, Anglican scholar and writer, was born in Belfast, Ireland.

On this day in 1847, the Rev. Michael Fackler baptized James McKinlay, marking the first recorded service using the American Book of Common Prayer in the Pacific Northwest.

On this day 1883, the Brotherhood of Saint Andrew, an organization of laymen in the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion, was organized in Chicago.

On this day in 1925, George Hugh Bourne, priest and hymnist, died at Saint Edmund's, Salisbury, England.

On this day in 1970, Church of North India was inaugurated at Nagpur with the union of: The Church of India, Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon (Anglican), The United Church of Northern India (Congregationalist and Presbyterian), the Baptist Churches of Northern India (British Baptists), the Churches of the Brethren in India, The Methodist Church (British and Australia Conferences) and the Disciples of Christ denominations.

On this day in 1170, Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Becket returned from a six-year exile in France for his opposition to the policies of Henry II. Four weeks after his return, four of Henry's knights murdered Thomas in the Canterbury Cathedral.

On this day in 1554, recently crowned Queen of England, Mary Tudor, daughter of Henry VIII, restored Roman Catholicism to the country. Nearly 300 Protestants would be burned at the stake by "Bloody Mary," including Thomas Cranmer, Hugh Latimer, and Nicholas Ridley. Nearly 400 more died by imprisonment and starvation.

On this day in 1729, Samuel Seabury, first bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States, was born in Groton, Connecticut.

On this day in 1530, Thomas Wolsey, cardinal and Lord Chancellor to England's King Henry VIII, died. Known as "a statesman rather than a churchman," Wolsey dismantled monasteries to fund Oxford University and devoted his life to king and country.

On this day in 1757, William Blake, English poet and artist, was born in London, England.

On this day in 1885, Benjamin Webb, priest and composer, died in London, England.

On this day in 1941, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, U.S. President and Episcopalian, signed a bill establishing the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day in the United States.

On this day in 1731, William Cowper, hymnist, was born at Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire, England.

On this day in 521, Saint Columba, apostle to Scotland, was born in Donegal, Ireland.

On this day in 1908, C.F.D. (Charles Francis Digby) Moule, Anglican priest and New Testament scholar, was born in Hangchow, China.

On this day in 1893, George Job Elvey, English sacred music composer and organist, died at Windlesham, Surrey, England.

On this day in 1983, John A.T. Robinson, bishop of Woolwich, and author of Honest to God, died.

On this day in 1962, John Melville Burgess was consecrated as suffragan bishop of Massachusetts, the first African American bishop of The Episcopal Church to serve a predominantly white diocese.

On this day in 1930, in response to the Anglican Lambeth Conference, which approved birth control, Pope Pius XI issued the encyclical Casti connubii.

On this day in 1858, Henry Ustic Onderdonk, bishop and hymnist, died in Philadelphia.

On this day in 1843, the world's first commercial Christmas cards were created in England.

On this day in 1902, Henry Stephen Cutler, Episcopal chorister and composer, died.

On this day in 1779, Thomas Cotterill, hymnist and priest, was born at Cannock, Staffordshire, England.

On this day in 1799, Hugh Stowell, hymnist and priest, was born at Douglas, Isle of Man.

On this day in 1808, the Bible Society of Philadelphia was organized, the first of its kind in America. William White, first and fourth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, was elected its first president.

On this day in 1826, John Ellerton, Anglican priest, hymnist and hymn translator, was born in London, England.

On this day in 1995, the Bishop of Southwest Virginia returned sacred land to Monacan Indians.

On this day in 1485, Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII, was born in Laredo Palace, Alcala de Henares, Spain.

On this day in 1715, Thomas Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury, beginning in 1695, died in London.

On this day in 1835, Phillips Brooks, Bishop of Massachusetts and author of "O Little Town of Bethlehem," was born in Boston.

On this day in 1640, Puritans introduced a petition to the English Parliament seeking to abolish the church episcopacy, "with all its dependencies, roots and branches." The House of Commons accepted what has become known as the "Roots and Branch Petition," but the House of Lords rejected it, and the episcopacy remained in the Church of England.

On this day in 1880, the Episcopal Diocese of Spokane was organized into a missionary district.

On this day in 1118, Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas a Becket was born in London. Becket's conflict with King Henry II over the rights and privileges of the Church led to his assassination by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral.

On this day in 1216, Pope Honorius III officially approved the Ordo Praedicatorum or Order of Preachers (the Dominicans).

On this day in 1855, William Henry Draper, Anglican priest and hymnist, was born in Kenilworth, England.

On this day in 1538, pope Paul III excommunicated Henry VIII of England.

On this day in 1909, Donald Coggan, 101st Archbishop of Canterbury, was born in London, England. 

On this day in 1917, the tune "St. Dunstan's" was written by C. Winfred Douglas while returning by train from New York to his home at Saint Dunstan's cottage in Peekskill, New York. Douglas became an Episcopal priest in 1899. He edited the New Hymnal in 1918, and helped develop the 1940 Hymnal as well.

On this day in 2001, a fire swept through the north transept of the Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City, destroying the gift shop and threatening the sanctuary.

On this day in 1576, Archbishop of Canterbury Edmund Grindal sent a letter to Queen Elizabeth protesting her order that he tell clergy throughout England to stop preaching so often; the Queen felt three or four sermons per year were sufficient.

On this day in 1838, Edwin Abbott Abbott, Church of England author and educator, was born in London.

On this day in 1594, Giovanni F. da Palestrina, one of the most gifted composer of Renaissance church music, died.

On this day in 1991, Archbishop of Canterbury Robert Runcie retired.

On this day in 1478, Thomas More, chiefly remembered for his principled refusal to accept King Henry VIII's claim to be the supreme head of the Church of England, was born in London.

On this day in 1556, Thomas Cranmer was deposed as Archbishop of Canterbury by Queen Mary I.

On this day in 1631, John Donne, poet and dean of St. Paul's Cathedral, preached his last sermon titled "Death's Duel."

On this day in 1801, John Henry Newman, Oxford Movement leader, was born in London.

On this day in 1208, Francis of Assisi experienced a vision in the church of Portunicula, Italy, that convinced him to begin a mission of preaching repentance, caring for lepers and aiding the peasants.

On this day in 1816, John E. Bode, Anglican clergyman, was born in St. Pancras, Middlesex, England.

On this day in 1985, Frank T. Griswold, III, was consecrated as bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago.

On this day in 1811, John S. B. Monsell, Anglican priest and hymnist, was born in Londonderry, Ireland.

On this day in 589, David of Wales, bishop and confessor, patron of Wales, died.

On this day in 1604, John Whitgift, the Anglican archbishop who attended Queen Elizabeth I on her deathbed and crowned James I king of England, died.

On this day in 1066, Westminster Abbey, one of the most famous church in England, opened its doors for the first time.

On this day in 1773, Christ Episcopal Church in Alexandria, Virginia, was completed after six years of construction.

On this day in 280, Constantine the Great, the first Roman emperor to be converted to the Christian faith, was born.

On this day in 1401, William Sawtrey, an English priest who followed the teachings of John Wycliffe, was condemned for heresy.

On this day in 398, John Chrysostom became bishop of Constantinople.

On this day in 1796, Samuel Seabury, first bishop of Episcopal Church in the United States, died.

On this day in 1570, Pope Pius V excommunicated and deposed Queen Elizabeth I, declaring her to be a usurper to the throne of England.

On this day in 1883, Leighton George Hayne, hymnist, died.

On this day in 1995, the Committee for a New Dialogue on Sexuality met at General Seminary in New York City.

On this day in 1698, British missionary Thomas Bray and four laymen founded the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) "to advance the honor of God and the good of mankind by promoting Christian knowledge both at home and in the other parts of the world by the best methods that should offer.

On this day 1530, Pope Clement VII rejected Henry VIII's request to divorce Catherine of Aragon.

On this day in 1976, John Shelby Spong was elected Bishop Coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Newark at a Special Convention.

On this day in 1518, Desiderius Erasmus sent a copy of Martin Luther's Ninety-five Theses to Sir Thomas More, the Lord Chancellor of England during Henry VIII's schism with Rome.

On this day in 1827, Abdul Masih (servant of Christ) died.  Abdul Masih adopted this name after his conversion by Anglican missionary Henry Martyn.

On this day in 1981, Henry B. Hucles III was elected suffragan bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island.

On this day in 1456, Johann Gutenberg first published the Bible on his printing press with movable type.

On this day in 1672, Charles II of England issued his first declaration of indulgence, suspending Parliament's legislation against Catholic and Protestant dissenters.

On March 16, 1789, Henry Ustic Onderdonk was born in New York. Onderdonk served as rector of St. Ann's Church in Brooklyn, New York. In 1827, he was consecrated in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and served as assistant bishop to the Rt. Rev. William White, the first bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania and the first and fourth presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church. Onderdonk succeeded White as bishop of Pennsylvania upon White's death in 1836.

On this day in 1748, John Newton, captain of a slave ship, was converted to Christianity during a huge storm at sea. After becoming an Anglican priest, Newton became a zealous abolitionist and wrote the famous hymn "Amazing Grace."

On this day in 1825, John J. Husband, English-born American music teacher and sacred music chorister, died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Husband  taught music in Philadelphia and worked as the clerk at St. Paul's Episcopal Church.

On this day in 1540, Waltham Abbey in Essex became the last monastery in England to surrender its allegiance to the Roman Catholic Church and support King Henry VIII and the emerging Church of England.

On this day in 1612, Bartholomew Legate, an English merchant known for his anti-Trinitarian theology, was burnt at the stake at Smithfield.

On this day in 1885, Christopher Wordsworth, priest and nephew of the English poet William Wordsworth, died in Lincoln, England.

On this day in 1789, Charlotte Elliott, English devotional writer, was born in Clapham, England.

On this day in 1312, Pope Clement V at the Council of Vienne dissolved the military Order of Knights Templar by an administrative ordinance.

On this day in 1902, George W. Warren, organist and choir director, died.  Warren served at St. Peter's Episcopal Church and St. Paul's Church  in Albany, New York and Holy Trinity Church and St. Thomas' Church in New York City. No music was played at his funeral, attended by thousands, as the mourners believed they could find no finer organist.

On this day in 1729, Johann Sebastian Bach conducted the first and only performance of St. Matthew Passion during his lifetime at a Good Friday Vespers service in Leipzig, Germany. The choral work has been called "the supreme cultural achievement of all Western civilization."

On this day in 1536, the clergy of England agreed to petition for the right to read the Bible.

On this day in 869 Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople was condemned by a Roman synod and later by a general council at Constantinople. But the various rulers of the area began choosing up sides, leading toward the split of the Eastern and Western churches within the next two hundred years.

On this day in 1579, the first Anglican service was held in the Americas. Francis Fletcher, sailing with Sir Francis Drake, read from the Book of Common Prayer in California.

On this day in 1604, King James I wrote to Bishop Bancroft that he had "appointed certain learned men to the number of four and fifty for the translating of the Bible." This translation later became the King James version of the Bible. 

On this day in 1979, Constancio B. Manguramas, Bishop of Southern Philippines, was installed as Prime Bishop of the Philippine Episcopal Church at the Cathedral of St. Mary.


On this day in 1531, King Henry VIII  was recognized as supreme head of the Church of England.

On this day in 1993, the first primate was inaugurated in the Anglican Church in Korea.
 

On this day in 1923, Alexander Charles Garrett became the fourteenth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church. 

On this day in 1161, Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury, died. He repeatedly quarreled with his superiors about church appointments and other political questions, but the influential French abbot Bernard of Clairvaux supported him. Theobald helped strengthen the English church and build the career of Thomas Becket, whom he recommended as chancellor to England's newly crowned King Henry

On this day in 1823, Anna L. Waring, Welsh Anglican hymn writer, was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales

On this day in 1718, David Brainerd, missionary to New England's Native Americans, was born in Haddam, Connecticut. Brainerd was expelled from Yale University for attending a revival meeting, Brainerd attained fame after his death when Jonathan Edwards published his journal.

On this day in 1761, English divine William Law died.

On this day in 1905, Joseph Fletcher was born in Newark, New Jersey.  Fletcher was an Episcopal priest who founded the theory of situational ethics in the 1960s and was a pioneer in the field of bioethics.

On this day in 1799, the Church Mission Society (formerly Church Missionary Society) was founded in London.

On this day in 1829, English Parliament granted freedom of religion to Roman Catholics in the Emancipation Act and within three weeks the first Roman Catholic was elected to Parliament.

On this day in 1548, the English Parliament ordered the publication of the first Book of Common Prayer.

On this day in 1593, George Herbert, Anglican priest and one of England's greatest religious poets, was born in Montgomery Castle.

On this day in 1687, James II issued a Declaration of Indulgence which allowed freedom of worship in England and also severely threatened Anglican control of church and state. The declaration permitted Nonconformists to meet, forgave penalties for ecclesiastical offenses and no longer required oaths of supremacy and allegiance for those in royal service.

On this day in 1811, Robert Raikes, Anglican layperson and founder of English Sunday schools in 1780, died.

On this day in 2002, Carol Gallagher, member to the Cherokee Nation, was consecrated suffragan bishop in Southern Virginia thus becoming the first indigenous female bishop.

On this day in 655, Deusdedit became the sixth and first English-born Archbishop of Canterbury.  He served as archbishop until 664.

On this day in 1991,  a royal commission confirmed the election of Dr. George Carey as the 103rd Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this day in 1998, Chilton Richardson Knudsen was ordained and consecrated the eighth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Maine and the eighth female bishop in the Episcopal Church.

On this day in 1556, after denying earlier forced recantations, Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer, author of the Book of Common Prayer, was burned at the stake by Queen Mary. Cranmer immeaditly thrusted his arm into the flames, saying the hand that had signed the recantations should burn first.

On this day in 1573, John Donne, poet and dean of St. Paul's Cathedral in London, was born.

On this day in 367,  Athanasius writes a letter containing a list of what he thinks should be considered the canon of Scripture, this list would later be accepted by the Church.

On this day in 1977, Beverly Messenger-Harris was ordained a priest in the Episcopal Diocese of Central New York.  Messenger-Harris was the first female rector of an Episcopal parish.

On this day in 1868, Benjamin Bosworth Smith became the ninth Presiding Bishop.

On this day in 1739, George Whitefield, preacher credited with starting America's first Great Awakening, was ordained an Anglican priest.

On this day in 1535, Henry VIII declares himself head of the Church of England.

On this day in 1923, Bishop Cameron Mann presided over the primary diocesan convention of the Diocese of Southern Florida (later the Dioceses of Southeast Florida, Southwest Florida, and Central Florida).

On this day in 1838, the first diocesan convention of the Episcopal Church in Florida was held in Tallahassee.

On this day in 1993, Herbert Thompson, Jr. was formally installed as the eighth diocesan bishop of Southern Ohio.

On this day in 1986, Edmond Lee Browning was consecrated as the 24th Presiding Bishop

On this day in 1992, the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania named the Church of the Saviour in Philadelphia as its official cathedral.

On this day in 1769, Thomas Middleton, first Anglican bishop of Calcutta, was born in Kedleston in Derbyshire, England.

On this day in 1208, Pope Innocent III placed Britain under an interdict after England's King John opposed the Pope's choice for Archbishop of Canterbury. Innocent canceled all religious services until John surrendered. Soon after his surrender, the king signed the Magna Carta, in which the first article affirms "That the Church of England shall be free.."

On this day in 1980, the Rt. Rev. Robert A.K. Runcie was installed as the 102nd Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this day in 1822, Hannibal Goodwin, former rector of the Episcopal House of Prayer in Newark, New Jersey, was born in Taughannock, New York.

On this day in 1836, Alexander Viets Griswold, fifth Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, was born in Simsbury, Connecticut.

On this day in 1988, Archbishop of Canterbury Arthur Michael Ramsey died in Oxford, England.
 

On this day in 1875, English New Testament textual critic Samuel P. Tragelles died. Tregelles' literary achievements included his work on G. V. Wigram's famous Englishman's Greek and Hebrew Concordances and the translation of Gesenius's Hebrew Lexicon into English.

On this day in 1879, New Testament scholar J.B. Lightfoot was consecrated Bishop of Durham.

On this day in 1992, Episcopal Church of Our Savior and Community Center opened in the heart of Manhattan's Chinatown - the first new Episcopal Church building in the City of New York in more than 30 years.

On this day in 1859, George Washington Doane, Episcopal priest and hymnist, died.

On this day in 1872, English devotional writer Frances Ridley Havergal wrote the words to the famous hymn "Lord, Speak to Me that I May Speak."
 

On this day in 1607, English settlers established the first Anglican church in the American colonies at Cape Henry, Virginia.

On this day in 418, Roman Emperor Honorius (384–423) issued a decree against Pelagianism, a teaching that a person can take the initial and fundamental steps toward salvation by one's own efforts, apart from divine grace.

On this day in 1976, Edmond Lee Browning was elected Bishop of Hawaii at a special convention of the diocese.  Browning later became the 24th Presiding Bishop.

On this day in 2001, Pope Shenouda III, pope of Alexandria of the Coptic Orthodox Church, made a visit to Nashotah House to deliver a lecture and to receive an honorary degree.

On this day in 1997, Mark MacDonald was elected seventh bishop of Alaska.

On this day in 1851, Arthur J. Mason, hymn translator, was born in England.

On this day in 553, the Second Council of Constantinople convened under the city's new patriarch Eutychius.

On this day in 1842, Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan, English composer, was born at Bolwell Terrace, Lambeth (London), England.  Sullivan composed some 72 hymns, most of them in the period 1861–75. The most famous of these are "Onward, Christian Soldiers" (1872, lyrics by Sabine Baring-Gould) and "Nearer, my God, to Thee" (the "Propior Deo" version).

On this day in 1952, Dom Gregory Dix, liturgical scholar and author of The Shape of the Liturgy, died.

On this day in 1851, the first missionary, the Rev. Willian Richmond, arrived in Oregon.

On this day in 1692, Anglicanism was made the state church of Maryland. Three years later this was overturned. The state had been founded by Lord Baltimore to provide a refuge for Roman Catholics.

On this day in 1985, the board of trustees of the Episcopal Divinity School unanimous voted to appoint the Rt. Rev. Otis Charles, Bishop of Utah, as dean.

On this day in 1373, English mystic Julian of Norwich receives 15 revelations which she later recorded her visions and her meditations 20 years later in her book The Sixteen Revelations of Divine Love.


On this day in 1577, Puritan meetings were forbidden by Elizabeth I of England.


On this day in 1704, Non-Anglicans were excluded from membership in South Carolina's assembly.

On this day in 1692, Joseph Butler, English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher, was born in Wantage in the English county of Berkshire (now Oxfordshire).  Butler is most famous for his Fifteen Sermons on Human Nature (1726) and Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed (1736). The Analogy is an important work of Christian apologetics in the history of the controversies over Deism.

On this day in 1759, Anglican evangelical and hymnist John Berridge preached his first outdoor sermon.

On this day in 1686, Robert Ratcliffe arrived in Boston with orders from England's King Charles II to found the Anglican Church in Massachusetts.

On this day in 1805, Anglican missionary Henry Martyn arrived in India to aid William Carey with translation work.

On this day in 1913, William Croswell Doane died. In 1869, Doane became the first Bishop of Albany. He served as rector of St. Mary's Church, Burlington, NJ, and Albany. He also served at St. John's Church, Hartford, CT (1863-67), and St. Peter's, Albany, NY (1867-69). He received honorary degrees from both Oxford and Cambridge.

On this day in 1533, Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, declared King Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Aragon null and void.

On this day in 1689, Parliament passed The Act of Toleration. The Act granted freedom of worship to Nonconformists i.e., Protestants who dissented from the Church of England, but not to Roman Catholics.

On this day in 1851, Edwyn Hoskyns, Anglican bishop and social reformer, was born at Aston-Tirrold, Berkshire. As Bishop of Southwell, England, from 1905 until his death in 1925, he devoted himself to improving labor conditions for the working class.

On this day in 1981, John Forsythe Ashby was consecrated as the second bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Kansas at St. John's Military School.

On this day in 1799, George Washington Doane, Bishop of New Jersey and hymnist, was born in Trenton, New Jersey.

On this day in 1805, William Paley, English divine, Christian apologist, utilitarian, and philosopher, died. Paley is best remembered for his watchmaker analogy, an argument for the existence of God in his book Natural Theology.

On this day in 1533, English reformer Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, declared King Henry VIII's marriage to Anne Boleyn valid, having earlier approved the king's divorce of Catherine of Aragon.

On this day in 1660, King Charles II triumphantly entered London, marking the full restoration of the English monarchy. Though Charles promised religious freedom, he cracked down on Dissenters following a 1661 attempt by religous fanatics to overthrow him.

On this day in 1997, Victoria Matthews became the Anglican Church of Canada's first woman diocesan bishop at All Saints Cathedral in Edmonton.

On this day in 1819, Reginald Heber, Bishop of Calcutta, wrote the famous missionary hymn "From Greenland's Icy Mountains."

On this day in 1162, Thomas Becket was consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this day in 1536, following Henry VIII's Declaration of Supremacy, English clergy drew up the Ten Articles of Religion, the first articles of the Anglican Church since its break from Roman Catholicism.

On this day in 1881, David Pendleton Oakerhater, a Cheyenne warrior, was ordained to the diaconate.

On this day in 1998, Jack Croneberger was elected bishop coadjutor on the fourth ballot to succeed Bishop John Spong.

On this day in 1991, Bishop Ronald Haines of Washington (D.C.) ordained Elizabeth Carl, an open lesbian, to the priesthood at the Church of the Epiphany in downtown Washington.

On this day in 1996, Bishop Winston Njongonkulu Ndungane was chosen to succeed Desmond Tutu as Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town.

On this day in 1818, Edward J. Hopkins, composer, was born at Westminster, London, England.  In 1882, the Archbishop of Canterbury awarded him an honorary Doctor of Music.

On this day in 1685, Thomas Ken, hymnist, was consecrated as Bishop of Bath and Wells.

On this day in 1819, Charles Kingsley, priest and author, was born in Devonshire, England.  Kingsley's most famous work is "The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby."

On this day in 1533, Pope Clement VII excommunicates England's King Henry VIII for remarrying after his divorce.

On this day in 1785, Samuel Seabury, first American bishop and second Presiding Bishop, was recognized as bishop of Connecticut in Convocation at Middletown, CT.

On this day in 1779, Francis Scott Key, author of "The Star-Spangled Banner" and one of the founders of the American Sunday School Union, was born.

On this day in 1633, Archbishop of Canterbury George Abbot died at Croydon.

On this day in 1853, the first convocation of clergy and laity of the Episcopal Church in the Oregon and Washington Territories was held in Oregon City.

On this day in 1980, Rustin Ray Kimsey was consecrated fifth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Oregon.

On this day in 1985, Alice Elizabeth (Betsy) Rodenmayer died.  Rodenmayer served the Episcopal Church in several women's ministry leadership positions for more than fifty years.

On this day in 1976, Presiding Bishop and Oklahoma Bishop Chilton Powell, chairman of the Standing Liturgical Commission, gathered at the Episcopal Church Center to commend the Draft Proposed Book as a study guide.

On this day in 1956, Hamilton West became the fifth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Florida.

On this day in 1980, David Henry Lewis, Jr. was consecrated suffragan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia.

On this day in 1693, King William III and Queen Mary II granted a charter to establish The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The college was originally intended to educate Anglican clergy and is America's second-oldest higher education institution.

On this day in 1984, Peter J. Lee was elected bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia.

On this day in 891, Photius, patriarch of Constantinople, died. His 867 encyclical, which objected to the filioque clause in the creed ("the Holy Spirit...who proceeds from the Father and the Son"), was significant in the East-West conflict that eventually led to the "Great Schism"

On this day in 1736, John and Charles Wesley, Anglicans who helped pioneered the Methodist movement, arrived in America at Savannah, Georgia.

On this day in 1555, John Rogers, the first Protestant martyr under Queen Mary I of England, was burned at the stake for heresy.

On this day in 1913, James A. Pike, controversial Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of California, was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

On this day in 1903, Joseph Parry, music scholar and composer, died.

On this day in 1689, William and Mary were proclaimed co-rulers of England.

On this day in 1733, Anglican presence in Georgia was established with Christ Church in Savannah, Georgia.

On this day in 1173, Pope Alexander III canonized Thomas Becket three years after the Archbishop of Canterbury's martyrdom at the hands of King Henry II's knights.

On this day in 1993, The Church of England held a special meeting to allow the ordination of women.

On this day in 1816, William H. Havergal, composer, was ordained a priest.

On this day in 1455, Johannes Gutenberg published the Bible, the first book ever printed on a press with movable type.

On this day in 1469, Tomasso de Vio Cajetan, famous cardinal who convinced Pope Clement VII to reject Henry VIII's request to divorce Catherine of Aragon, is born in Gaeta, Italy.

On this day in 1377, John Wycliffe stood trial in London's Saint Paul's Cathedral for his criticism of the church.

On this day 1781, Henry Martyn, missionary and Bible translator in India, was born in Truro, Cornwall, England.

On this day in 1234, Edmund was consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury.

On this day in 1093, the new Winchester Cathedral was dedicated by Walkelin. Winchester Cathedral is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe. It is dedicated to the Holy Trinity, St. Peter, St. Paul and St. Swithun and is the seat of the Bishop of Winchester and center of the Diocese of Winchester.

On this day in 1199, England's King Richard I, the "Lionhearted," died at age 41. Richard, as one of the three leaders of the Third Crusade, negotiated Christian access to Jerusalem.

On this day in 146, Septimius Severus, emperor of Rome from 193 to 211, was born.  He persecuted the Christian Church although he had once been friendly to the Christian cause.

On this day in 1582, the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, was chartered. The founding of the University is attributed to Bishop Robert Reid of St. Magnus Cathedral, Kirkwall, Orkney, who left the funds on his death in 1558 that ultimately provided the University's endowment.

On this day in 1888, Matthew Arnold, English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools, died suddenly of heart failure. 

On this day in 1662, England's King Charles II approved a bill requiring all ministers to assent publicly to the Book of Common Prayer.

On this day in 1754, Columbia University was chartered as King's College in New York City under the Church of England.

On this day in 1979, the Rev. Roberto Martinez, rector of the San Jose de Gracia Cathedral, was elected suffragan bishop of the Diocese of Central and South Mexico.

On this day in 1549, England's first Act of Uniformity, passed by Parliament in January, took effect. The act ordered that religious services be consistent throughout the country, using Thomas Cranmer's Book of Common Prayer.

History of The Episcopal Church

The beginnings of the Church of England, from which The Episcopal Church derives, date to at least the second century, when merchants and other travelers first brought Christianity to England. It is customary to regard St. Augustine of Canterbury's mission to England in 597 as marking the formal beginning of the church under papal authority, as it was to be throughout the Middle Ages.

In its modern form, the church dates from the English Reformation of the 16th century, when royal supremacy was established and the authority of the papacy was repudiated. With the advent of British colonization, the Church of England was established on every continent. In time, these churches gained their independence, but retained connections with the mother church in the Anglican Communion.

(Copyright 1999, Diocese of Oregon. All rights reserved.)