Welcomes You

Sermons and Statements

February 23, 2014

We’re here today to celebrate the next chapter in a very long story.  The history of this diocese has roots in the first worship by Anglicans, led by Sir Francis Drake’s chaplain north of San Francisco in 1579.  A group of Native Americans stood by and watched.  It took 270 years before there was a settled congregation – which continues today as Trinity-St....

February 22, 2014

When I visited here the last time, I got to see several remarkable ministries.  I am frequently reminded of one of them – an afterschool tutoring program that worked with Sudanese immigrants.  I was given a small piece of art, painted by one of these students.  It shows a brilliant blue sky and rolling brown sand dunes.  It’s intriguing because I don’t...

February 21, 2014

A couple of weeks ago I had a free Sunday in New York and took the opportunity to visit a congregation I’d just heard about.  The subway put me off in a really gritty part of Brooklyn.  Outside the station there were a quite few dilapidated buildings, plenty of graffiti, and a number of signs of emerging new life.  I walked a couple of blocks to a building that houses a...

February 8, 2014

Have you ever noticed how much time and energy we spend on what we eat?  A current best-seller tells us to eat more fat and protein and give up sugars and grains, because they cause dementia.[1]...

February 5, 2014
Traditionally the church has talked about two kinds of martyrs – white martyrs and red ones.  Red martyrs shed blood for claiming their faith, like Perpetua and Paul, or because of the challenge that they’ve offered to the principalities and powers of this world – like Martin Luther King, Jr. and Oscar Romero.  White martyrs are remarkable witnesses to the way of...
January 18, 2014

The only international museum devoted to slavery is in Liverpool, England.  Long before the Titanic, Liverpool was the site of ship manufacturing and trade in slaves and the products of their labors.  By the 1740s it was the leading British slaving port, and remained so until Britain outlawed the slave trade in 1807.  Liverpool’s merchant ships transported more than a...

December 15, 2013

There’s been a running story in the New York Times this week about a homeless family with 8 children.  They live in a shelter in Brooklyn, and the writer has followed an 11 year old girl in particular – the oldest child who bears outsized responsibility for her younger siblings in this much-stressed family....

November 20, 2013

We’re celebrating 50 years of this remarkable community on the feast of an English king and martyr who died in the year 870.  The two do have something to do with one another.  Not only does this community continue to grow in the communion of saints who’ve shared life here for the last 50 years, but also with the saints from a much longer trajectory in our collective...

November 10, 2013

I am humbled by this honor, and reminded that I stand here only because of the difficult work done by so many women and men before me.  Elizabeth Blackwell went through 29 medical schools before she found one that would admit her, albeit grudgingly after what looked like another attempt to keep her and her gender out.  I give thanks for the male deans and professors who kept their...

November 10, 2013

I recall sitting in the exit row of a plane once, when a very big person arrived to sit across the aisle from me.  I really wondered if that person would physically be able to get through the exit.  It made me reflect on the ways airlines prepare to deal with emergency evacuations – disabled people can’t sit in the exit row, but they still need to get out of the plane, so...