Welcomes You

Sermons and Statements

May 2, 2013

There is something very appropriate about celebrating the feast of Athanasius in the midst of conversations about hope and climate change.  Athanasius was a priest and then bishop in the 4th century in Egypt.  He’s best remembered for his earnest opposition to the heresy called Arianism.  At the time the church was still sorting out the particulars of...

May 1, 2013

The idea of changing climate elicits grief in many people, as well it should.  That grief finds expression in many of the classic ways that we respond to all kinds of loss.  Some simply can’t imagine that it’s real – and there are still more than a few climate deniers out there.  Some try to find someone to blame, or shift it away from themselves: they say...

April 27, 2013

Alleluia!

We’re here today to breathe new life into a dying body – the body of God’s creation.  It’s going to take the breath we have in us, and the breath of many, many others.  Breathe in the breath of God, of life, and give it back – now, breathe!  We’re going to need all the confidence we have that the act of breathing in and...

April 21, 2013

 

Last week an advisory council I’m part of gave the Obama administration a report on human trafficking.[1]  It has ten major recommendations on how government, faith groups, and non-profits can work together to end modern forms of slavery.  As the Council finished its meeting, we thanked the young woman who guided us...

April 16, 2013

I have been asked to speak about the American military bases here in Okinawa, and what role our respective churches have to play in regard to those bases.  So that we might all begin with a shared understanding of these realities, I will begin with a broad outline of the history behind the present situation here, from three primary perspectives:  the history of Okinawa, the history...

April 7, 2013

Happy Anniversary!  There is some really delightful possibility in using the readings for the eve of Annunciation to celebrate your 90 years.  There must be a story of Hannah or Elizabeth in the offing.  Are we to expect a surprising birth in an aged household?  Actually, I think we are supposed to do just that, and I think you all have been in on the story for quite a...

April 7, 2013

I’ve been having browser problems for the last couple of weeks.  I haven’t been able to find videos that Episcopal News Service has been posting.  The link works, but no video box comes up on the story page.  When I asked the communications crew a couple of days ago, they basically said it was news to them and they’d see what they could find out.  One of...

March 17, 2013

How’s your Lent been this year?  Some people think you’re supposed to give up all frivolity, laughter, and joy, and just act depressed, because – you know – this is all about discipline.  That really misses the point of Lent.  Lent is meant to be a kind of spring training, a time to learn or remember the skills and habits of Christian living....

March 8, 2013

Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy was a priest of the Church of England who volunteered to serve as an army chaplain in the First World War.  He was a notable and skilled poet, not unlike his predecessors George Herbert and John Donne, well rooted in the glory of God’s created order as well as the labors of a parish priest.  His later poetry reflected his war experience and his deeply...

March 3, 2013

I had several robust conversations last week with the members of Executive Council, and with members of the churchwide staff, about Ashes to Go.  Episcopalians from all across this Church talked about their experiences on Ash Wednesday of going out into the streets – to the train station or subway, on a bus to the airport (and on a cross-country flight), bearing ashes and...