ECUMENICAL AND INTERRELIGIOUS

The Episcopal Church – United Methodist Dialogue group have prepared A Gift to the World: Co-Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness; The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church - A Proposal for Full Communion, the result of dialogue for a formal full-communion relationship.

In a recent letter, Bishop Frank Brookhart of Montana, Episcopal Church co-chair of the committee, with Bishop Gregory V. Palmer, the United Methodist Church, Ohio West Episcopal Area, offered, “The relationships formed over these years of dialogue, and the recognition that there are presently no theological impediments to unity, paved the way for this current draft proposal.” The entire letter is available here

A Gift to the World: Co-Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness; The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church - A Proposal for Full Communion, is located here 

In the coming months, opportunities for feedback, regional gatherings, and discussions will be slated.

Additional related information, including historical documents, is available here

The work of the Episcopal-United Methodist Dialogue is enabled by two General Convention resolutions here and here.

For more information contact the Rev. Margaret Rose, Episcopal Church Deputy for Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations.

Members

Members of the Episcopal-United Methodist Dialogue are:

Episcopal

Bishop C. Franklin Brookhart

Bishop David Rice

The Rev. Dr. Thomas Ferguson

The Rev. Dr. Deirdre Good

The Rev. Jordan M. Haynie Ware

The Rev.  Margaret R. Rose – Staff
 

United Methodist

Bishop Gregory Palmer

Reverend Patricia Farris

Reverend Dr. James Howell

Reverend Dr. Pamela Lightsey

Bishop Michael Watson

Reverend Dr. Robert J. Williams

Kyle Tau, PhD, MTS - staff

 

 

The Episcopal Church – United Methodist Dialogue group have prepared A Gift to the World: Co-Laborers for the Healing of Brokenness; The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church - A Proposal for Full Communion, the result of dialogue for a

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry joined the leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in preparing Advent Devotions for the upcoming liturgical season.

Titled “Liberated by God’s Grace” and available here. The weekly devotions were prepared by

  • The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry. Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Episcopal Church
  • The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton, Presiding Bishop, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
  • The Most Rev. Fred Hiltz, Primate, Anglican Church of Canada
  • The Rev. Susan C. Johnson, National Bishop, Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada

“As churches shaped by the 16th century reformations—the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, the Episcopal Church, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America—we also participate in this ministry of reconciliation,” they noted in a joint letter. “Over fifteen years ago, our churches’ respective full communion agreements inaugurated new relationships in which we fully recognized each other “as churches in which the gospel is truly preached and the holy sacraments duly administered” (Called to Common Mission), an achievement that “marks but one step toward the eventual visible unity of the whole Church catholic” (Waterloo Declaration). We are committed to working together toward reconciliation—of the church, and of the deepest social ills that plague our world. It is our hope, together with you, to be signs of anticipation—of the “already, but not yet” of God’s realm of reconciliation, justice, and peace.”

The Advent Devotions can be downloaded for websites, bulletin inserts, church programs, and used as discussion points.

Presiding Bishop Curry’s contribution is Advent 3, Matthew 11:2-11: Salvation – Not for Sale.

For more information contact the Rev. Margaret Rose.

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry joined the leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in preparing Advent Devotions for the

Following a two-day meeting in April, The Episcopal Church-United Methodist Dialogue Committee issued the following Communique:

April 27, 2016

Episcopalians and United Methodists met in Charlotte, North Carolina, for the third session of their Dialogue on Full Communion (25-27 April 2016). The ten committee members, along with staff from each church, shared in conversation, meals, prayer, and a celebration of the Eucharist. It was a time for building relationships between representatives of two sibling churches that have long desired to grow closer in common witness to the gospel of Christ and in mission for the healing of God’s world.

The dialogue session made substantive progress towards a proposal for full communion between The Episcopal Church and The United Methodist Church. Committee members continued to learn about the history, beliefs, practices, and ways of living as church that are found in each tradition. Many are shared in common by both traditions.  Dialogue participants also discussed and appreciated our distinctiveness.  Among these are the ways our churches have shaped their institutions and approaches to ministry appropriate to their particular missional contexts.

Dialogue participants shared their own questions with one another and began developing FAQs.  Sharing answers to these queries will assist both churches as we grow closer in relationship with one another. 

The next session will be held in October 2016.  

Alongside their work as a Dialogue Committee, participants, noting the recent passage of House Bill 2 in the State Legislature of North Carolina, found themselves confronted with an example of the common challenges faced by all Christians as they work to faithfully give witness to the sacred dignity of all people. The Committee, in recognition of the harmful effects of the bill, stands with our Episcopal and United Methodist bishops in North Carolina, calling upon the legislature to repeal this discriminatory law.

The central point of Episcopalians and United Methodists working to strengthen their relationship with each other is faithfully and effectively to proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ and to work for the healing of a divided and suffering world.

Our gratitude goes to the Rev. James Howell and Myers Park United Methodist Church for their gracious hospitality.   

 

Participants: 

Bishop Frank Brookhart (Episcopal Co-chair)

Bishop Gregory Palmer (United Methodist Co-chair)

The Rev. Dr. Pamela Lightsey (United Methodist)

The Rev. Jordan Haynie Ware (Episcopal)

Dr. Deirdre Good (guest) (Episcopal)

The Rev. Dr. Robert J. Williams (United Methodist)

Bishop David Rice (Episcopal)

The Rev. Patricia Farris (United Methodist)

The Rev. Dr. Tom Ferguson (Episcopal)

Bishop Mary Ann Swenson (United Methodist)

The Rev. James Howell (United Methodist)

Staff:  Dr.  Glen Alton Messer (United Methodist), Ms. Jeanette Nunez (United Methodist), the Rev. Margaret Rose (Episcopal)

 

Following a two-day meeting in April, The Episcopal Church-United Methodist Dialogue Committee issued the following Communique: April 27, 2016 Episcopalians and United Methodists met in Charlotte, North Carolina, for the third session of their

The Episcopal Church is seeking representatives to serve on ecumenical dialogues and coordinating committees. Representatives can be lay or ordained, and must be committed to and have experience in ecumenism.

"Engaging other Christians through our ecumenical dialogues and networks is vital work," commented the Rev. Dr. Charles K. Robertson, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Ministry Beyond the Episcopal Church, "and one more way of engaging the Jesus Movement and its focus on reconciliation." 

The Rev. Margaret Rose, Deputy to the Presiding Bishop for Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, added, "We seek representatives with scholarly and practical experience in ecumenical work to serve on the dialogues and coordinating committees."

The five dialogues and committees are:

 

  • Anglican - Roman Catholic USA Dialogue Committee
  • United Methodist - Episcopal Dialogue Committee
  • Lutheran (ELCA) - Episcopal Coordinating Committee
  • Episcopal - Presbyterian (PCUSA) Dialogue
  • Moravian - Episcopal Coordinating Committee

 

Episcopal representatives to these bodies will be appointed by Executive Council upon the recommendation of the Presiding Bishop and the President of the House of Deputies.

At this time, the committees with the Roman Catholics, the United Methodists, and the Lutherans have vacancies that need to be filled as soon as possible. Candidates should submit a letter of interest, along with a resume/CV to the Rev. Margaret Rose at mrose@episcopalchurch.org.

The next round of the Anglican - Roman Catholic USA Dialogue Committee (ARCUSA) will address the subject, “Reconciliation in Holy Scripture and Christian Tradition.” As in previous iterations of ARCUSA, members of the dialogue should possess a Ph.D. or its equivalent, or display scholarly experience in theology and practice, as well as expertise in the subject addressed. Statements from previous rounds of dialogue are collected here.

The United Methodist - Episcopal Dialogue Committee seeks practitioners and scholars with experience and knowledge of ecumenical full communion agreements, as well as particular knowledge of the United Methodist Church. This committee’s goal is full communion in the coming years and invites those who have skill and experience in local mission and ministry partnerships to apply.   

The Lutheran-Episcopal Coordinating Committee (LECC) works to encourage new levels of trust, cooperation, and mission, as well as support existing cooperative ministries, between the two churches. We are in the second decade of Called to Common Mission, our full communion agreement.   That agreement can be found here.

For more information contact Rose at mrose@episocpalchurch.org, or go to http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/ecumenical-interreligious.

 Deadline for submissions is May 1. 

The Episcopal Church is seeking representatives to serve on ecumenical dialogues and coordinating committees. Representatives can be lay or ordained, and must be committed to and have experience in ecumenism. "Engaging other Christians through our

Bishop Stacy Sauls, Chief Operating Officer of The Episcopal Church, will preach at an Interim Shared Eucharist with the United Methodist Church on March 3 at 5:30 pm at John Street United Methodist Church in New York City. United Methodist New York Annual Conference Resident Bishop Jane Allen Middleton will preside.

Sponsored by the Episcopal Diocese of New York, the historic Eucharist between The Episcopal Church and the United Methodist Church will follow The Episcopal Church-United Methodist Church Common Guidelines for Interim Eucharist Sharing.  

“The growing unity between United Methodists and Episcopalians is a source of great joy for me as someone who was formed in the Methodist Church as a child,” commented Bishop Sauls. “I continue to value the depth of Methodist spirituality and appreciate the Methodist gift for piety in the best possible sense, and I am filled with hope at the missional opportunities we might pursue together.”

Nicholas Birns, chairman of the Diocese of New York Episcopal – Methodist Dialogue, noted that this service marks the second Interim Shared Eucharist. The first, he said, occurred at St. Paul’s Chapel, New York City, in May 2012. “At that time, the Episcopalians hosted, United Methodist Bishop Jeremiah Park co-presided, and the preacher was Bishop Robert Rimbo of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA),” Birns said.

March 3 is significant as it is the day The Episcopal Church celebrates the lives of John and Charles Wesley.

For the past ten years, the United Methodist Church and The Episcopal Church have been in discussion and discernment moving forward to “full communion” which involves a relationship between church organizations that mutually recognize sharing basic doctrines. This relationship involves: mutual recognition of members, joint celebration of Holy Communion/Eucharist, mutual recognition of ordained clergy, mutual recognition of the sacraments and a common commitment to mission. Both the United Methodist Church and The Episcopal Church share full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, but not with each other. The Episcopal Church also shares full communion with the Moravian Church.

The John Street parish started as a prayer circle of Methodists who also attended formal services at Trinity Church, Wall Street.  After American independence, and the consequent formal break between Methodists and Episcopalians, these ties were severed.

Recently, an Interim Shared Eucharist between The Episcopal Church and the United Methodist Church was celebrated at the Episcopal Church’s National Cathedral in Washington DC.

 

 

 

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Bishop Stacy Sauls, Chief Operating Officer of The Episcopal Church, will preach at an Interim Shared Eucharist with the United Methodist Church on March 3 at 5:30 pm at John Street United Methodist Church in New York City. United Methodist New

The leaders of The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada have issued a joint statement following 12 years of full communion.

 

A Word to the Churches

from the heads of

The Anglican Church of Canada

The Episcopal Church

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada

 

            Twelve years ago Anglicans and Lutherans in Canada and Episcopalians and Lutherans in the United States and Canada embarked together on a journey of full communion, by which we fully recognize each other “as churches in which the gospel is truly preached and the holy sacraments duly administered” (Called to Common Mission). With joy we can point to many ways in which our churches have drawn more closely together in the service of the gospel. We would highlight just a few:

In the United States:

  • Joint congregations and mission planning: A number of Episcopal and Lutheran congregations across the United States are becoming more and more integrated by sharing buildings, clergy, and worship with each other, in the spirit of full communion. The two churches are also planting new ministries together and cooperating in outreach ministries.
  • Combined disaster relief efforts: Lutherans and Episcopalians have pooled their resources to help respond to the victims of natural disasters, from floods in Iowa to hurricanes in Mississippi.
  • Shared personnel: The Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America share campus ministries and training for federal prison and military chaplains, as well as an international policy and advocacy staff person in Washington, D.C.

In Canada:

  • Joint Assembly: In July the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada will hold their General Synod and National Convention together in the form of a Joint Assembly under the theme, “Together for the Love of the World.” They will worship together, consider God’s mission in the world today, and discern next steps in their relationship as churches in full communion.
  • Combined youth and worship gatherings: The Canadian Lutheran-Anglican Youth (CLAY) gathering and the Anglican-Lutheran National Worship Conference are two biennial events organized and sponsored jointly by both churches.
  • Shared space: The Diocese of Rupert’s Land and the Manitoba/Northwestern Ontario Synod are sharing the same office space in Winnipeg and have published a joint issue of the diocesan newspaper.

We celebrate also those things we have been able to do together as full communion partners across the Canada-U.S. border, and the four of us look forward to participating in the Joint Assembly in Ottawa in July. That chance to be together will be in addition to a meeting that happens among us each year. As the heads of our respective churches, we gather for a time of prayer, discussion, and fellowship. At our most recent meeting, held last December in Chicago, we reflected on the accomplishments of more than a decade of full communion.

We also recognized that in many ways we are still at the very beginning of our relationship as full communion partners, and that our full and mutual recognition of each other’s ministries and sacraments “marks but one step toward the eventual visible unity of the whole Church catholic” (Waterloo Declaration). There is so much more we can be doing as churches in full communion, both within our respective countries and across the international boundary. We invite you to consider a few of the possibilities before us:

  • Theological education: Can our churches work more collaboratively as we call forth and form lay and ordained leadership? Are those being trained for leadership in our churches instilled with the spirit of full communion? Do we equip them with the knowledge and tools they require to give expression to full communion among the local communities they will serve?
  • Shared episcopal oversight: As a parallel to Anglican/Episcopal-Lutheran combined congregations that share a single priest or pastor, are there some regions of our countries where a similar model might be appropriate at the diocesan/synodical level? Could such a form of shared episcopal oversight in some places enhance the church’s ministry and mission?
  • Speaking with one voice: In countless ways our countries and churches share a common context that would allow us to speak in unison on many issues affecting Canadians and Americans, as well as to our global neighbours. What might our four churches say together about the environment, resource extraction, immigration, Indigenous people, poverty, the Holy Land? Might our voices in the public square be more clearly and credibly heard if they speak as one?

When the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America came into full communion in 2001, we acknowledged that “we do not know what new, recovered, or continuing tasks of mission this Concordat will lead our churches” (Called to Common Mission). Similarly, when the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Anglican Church of Canada celebrated full communion that same year, we declared ourselves “ready to be co-workers with God in whatever tasks of mission serve the gospel” (Waterloo Declaration).

As we continue the journey as full communion partners, may we have the courage and determination to follow where the Holy Spirit is leading our churches, and the strength and steadfastness to be faithful in serving God’s mission in the world—together.

 

Bishop Mark Hanson
Presiding Bishop
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
The Most Rev. Fred Hiltz
Primate
Anglican Church of Canada
The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church
Bishop Susan Johnson
National Bishop
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada

 

A Word To The Churches:

http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/ecumenical-interreligious

http://library.episcopalchurch.org/document/word-churches

 

The Episcopal Church: www.episcopalchurch.org

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The leaders of The Episcopal Church, the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada have issued a joint statement following 12 years of full communion.   A Word to the