Glossary

An important pre-Revolutionary parish. It had a strong association with both the College of William and Mary and the colonial government of Virginia. In 1632 or 1633, the parish of Middler Plantation was formed. In 1658 it was combined, by act of the Colonial Assembly, with Harrop Parish to form... Read More »

(June 27, 1875-Sept. 26, 1963). Priest and church historian. He was born in Danville, Virginia. Brydon received his B.A. from Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia, in 1896, and his B.D. from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1899. He was ordained deacon on June 23, 1899, and priest on May 31, 1900.... Read More »

(Nov. 1, 1491-Feb. 28, 1551). Reformation leader. He was born in Schlettstadt, Alsace. Bucer came under the influence of Martin Luther, and from 1523 he worked as a reforming pastor in Strasbourg. After the death of Ulrich Zwingli in 1531, Bucer became the leader of the reformed churches in... Read More »

(c. 1582-c. 1642). Colonial clergyman. He studied at Caius College, Cambridge. He arrived at Jamestown, Virginia, on May 23, 1610, as the second minister at James City Parish. He succeeded Robert Hunt. Buck officiated at the marriage of John Rolfe and Pocahontas on Apr. 14, 1614. He opened with... Read More »

(b. Mar. 11, 1909). First African American diocesan bishop. Burgess was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan. In 1934 he received his B.D. from the Episcopal Theological School. Burgess was ordained deacon on July 29, 1934, and priest on Jan... Read More »

Funeral rite for burial of a baptized Christian, including anthems, psalms, scripture readings, and prayers. The BCP provides both traditional and contemporary liturgies (pp. 469-507). This rite may serve as the liturgy of the word at a Requiem Eucharist. When there is communion at the Burial of... Read More »

This school was granted a charter on Feb. 27, 1846. It was founded by Bishop George Washington Doane in Burlington, New Jersey. It was adjacent to and affiliated with St. Mary's Hall for girls, which was founded in 1837. During the 1870s the college had a Divinity Department. Burlington... Read More »

(May 13, 1832-Dec. 26, 1904). Leading deaconess and founder of the Dakota League. She was born in Quincy, Massachusetts. In 1852 she married Wesley Burnham. He spent most of his time working in the Sandwich Islands in the sugar cane industry. In 1864 she founded the Dakota League and served as its... Read More »

(June 6, 1904-Jan. 10, 1994). Prominent historian of the Episcopal Church. He was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. Burr received his B.A. in 1927 and his Ph.D. in 1937 from Princeton University. His first position was supervisor of the Church Records Survey for the northeastern United States in... Read More »

A case of two squares of stiff material, hinged or bound together at one end, which contains the corporal and purificators for use at the celebration of the eucharist. The burse is covered in the liturgical color of the day, and placed on top of the veil which covers the chalice.

(May 18, 1692-June 16, 1752). Bishop and opponent of deism. He was born in Wantage, England, to Presbyterian parents. In 1714 he left the Presbyterians, joined the Church of England, and entered Oriel College, Oxford. Butler was ordained priest in 1718. From 1719 until 1726, he was the preacher at... Read More »

BVM

" These three letters stand for the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus.

Principal liturgical tradition of the Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches. It originated in Constantinople, which was the city of Byzantium in ancient times. The heritage of the liturgy is Syrian and Palestinian, going back to the two great Syrian centers of Antioch and Jerusalem. The Byzantine... Read More »

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Glossary definitions provided courtesy of Church Publishing Incorporated, New York, NY,(All Rights reserved) from "An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church, A User Friendly Reference for Episcopalians," Don S. Armentrout and Robert Boak Slocum, editors.