The Public Affairs Office

The Public Affairs Office provides statistics, biographies, photos, background information, and other resources to media representatives reporting on the mission and ministries of the Episcopal Church.

The Toolkit:
The Toolkit of the Public Affairs Office is designed for your use to help enhance your message, broaden your reach and offer tips for placements into regional, secular, and other media – both traditional and social. It is located on the Public Affairs pages of the Episcopal Church website here.

Subscribe to the Public Affairs Office’s e-mail lists to receive the latest information about The Episcopal Church. "Media Releases" provides up-to-the-minute information about news, events, and resources from The Episcopal Church. The "Daily Scan" is a daily list of links to news stories in the mass media that highlight The Episcopal Church, Episcopal parishes and dioceses, and Episcopalians. Subscribe here.

On Thursday, December 8, Thursdays at 2 will feature Andy Russell, an Episcopal Church Young Adult Service Corps volunteer as he shared his experiences in the African country of Tanzania.

The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned.

Andy Russell from the Diocese of Southern Virginia has served as a Young Adult Service Corps (YASC) volunteer in the Diocese of Central Tanganyika, Tanzania. The experience, he says, has helped him to grow and expand his outlook on life.

Young Adult Service Corps, commonly known as YASC, are young adults (21-30 years old) who engage in mission and ministry in the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here.

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Two Tables
  • The Food Pantry at St. Gregory Nyssa in San Francisco, CA
  • @OurTable
  • Carrie Black
  • Young Adult Service Corps
  • The Crossing
  • United Thank Offering at St. Paul's Senior Center
  • Amazing Grace
  • Creating Us
  • St. Thomas Choir School
  • Bridal designer Anne Barge
  • Musician Mike Notter
  • Reflections by Brother Geoffrey
  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • I am a missionary: The Rev. Jimmy Bartz
  • Potluck Dinners
  • Jericho Road
  • Jennifer Caldwell and Episcopal Moments
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table
  • Missional Voices
  • Church on the Square in Baltimore
  • Episcopal Church Advocacy
  • Missional Communities
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes, a food truck ministry in the Diocese of Rhode Island
  • Double Down on Love, an original song from the Thad's Band in Santa Monica, CA, Diocese of Los Angeles
  • The Slate Project, an Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation that exists online and in person.
  • The Rev. Scott Claasan of St Michael’s University Church reflecting on how music and surfing led him back to church. 

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

 

Tanzania YASC

On Thursday, December 8, Thursdays at 2 will feature Andy Russell, an Episcopal Church Young Adult Service Corps volunteer as he shared his experiences in the African country of Tanzania. The video is available here and is also available closed-...
Tagged in: positions

Applications are being accepted for a new position, the Director of the Reconciliation, Justice and Stewardship of Creation, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff.

The Reconciliation, Justice and Stewardship of Creation department includes staff who facilitate and lead churchwide ministry in relation to the Racial Reconciliation and Justice, Domestic Poverty, Stewardship of Creation, and the United Thank Offering.

This full-time position reports directly to the Canon for Evangelism, Reconciliation, and Stewardship of Creation, and was developed in direct response to the church’s call to transform unjust social structures, to respect the dignity of every person, and to protect the gift of creation. The Director of the Reconciliation, Justice and Stewardship of Creation will be responsible for Domestic Poverty and Jubilee Ministries and will partner with the Advisory Council on Stewardship of Creation to develop and support eco-justice sites and networks. The Director will also supervise and provide support to staff officers who organize the church’s justice and reconciliation efforts.

Complete information and application instructions for this position are available here  

Deadline for applying is January 9, 2017.

For more information contact a member of the Episcopal Church Human Resources Team at hrm@episcopalchurch.org

The Episcopal Church values diversity of culture and thought and seeks talented, qualified employees regardless of race, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, gender identity and expression, or any other protected classification under Federal, State or Municipal law as well as the Canons of the Episcopal Church and resolutions of the Episcopal Church General Convention.  We are proud to be an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

Applications are being accepted for a new position, the Director of the Reconciliation, Justice and Stewardship of Creation, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff. The Reconciliation, Justice and Stewardship of Creation department includes staff...

The Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music (SCLM) plans to present the 2018 General Convention with four options regarding the possible revision of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, said the Rev. Devon Anderson, commission chair.

The options, discussed in detail on the SCLM’s blog, are:

  • Revision of the prayer book beginning after the 2018 General Convention;
  • Creation of a book or books of alternative services beginning after the 2018 General Convention, with no accompanying revision of the prayer book;
  • A postponement of the decision on the prayer book and supplemental resources until the completion of a church-wide conversation on liturgical theology and practice during the 2018-2021 triennium
  • A step back from liturgical revision and a commitment to exploring the theology of the current prayer book in greater depth. 

“We want to give General Convention everything it needs to give the SCLM very detailed direction and sufficient funding to follow that direction,” Anderson said. “We want to call the church to a collective discernment that leads to a decision.”

Resolution A169 of the 2015 General Convention directed the SCLM “to prepare a plan for the comprehensive revision of the current Book of Common Prayer and present that plan to the 79th General Convention.”

The commission is taking a data-driven approach to its work, and hopes to use several methods of gathering the information and opinions that will shape its conversations, Anderson said.

These methods include collecting and analyzing bulletins to gauge current practice in the church; interviewing Anglican partners who have recently revised their prayer books; holding small group discussions about the prayer book across the church, beginning at the 2018 General Convention; and sponsoring conferences on the prayer book at Virginia Theological Seminary and the School of Theology at Sewanee, the University of the South.

These methods can be tested in the next two years and deployed church-wide between the conventions in 2018 and 2021, Anderson said.

The commission is also hoping to commission a church-wide research project in cooperation with the Church Pension Group to determine Episcopalians’ current attitudes towards the prayer book. The study would follow “grounded theory” methodology, which seeks data not to confirm a previously conceived theory, but to find testable theories within the information gathered.

Anderson said data gathering is an essential step if either prayer book revision or the creation of supplemental liturgical resources is to proceed.  “The Book of Common Prayer is the fullest statement of our faith, and the deepest expression of our theology,” she said. “If we are going to revise it, it is essential that people from across the church can share their thoughts, their anxieties and their hopes with us. That is why we are focusing, at this point, on hearing the voices of our people.”

The SCLM blog also includes updates from subcommittees working on the Book of Occasional Services, the Calendar of Commemorations, congregational song, and liturgical resources that speak to issues of racial injustice and reconciliation.

 

The Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music (SCLM) plans to present the 2018 General Convention with four options regarding the possible revision of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, said the Rev. Devon Anderson, commission chair. The options,...

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement on the news concerning the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation:

 

This morning, the sun ascended over the Great Plains of our nation, and hope truly dawned anew.

After months of courageously and peacefully working to prevent the laying of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which posed potential danger to the water supply of the people of the Sioux Nation and transgressed their sacred burial grounds, the water protectors on Standing Rock have won a notable victory. Yesterday afternoon, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced their decision to deny an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline’s construction across the sacred land and water of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and this long-awaited announcement is cause for joyful celebration and thanks.

On behalf of the Episcopal Church, I offer my gratitude to President Barack Obama and his Administration for championing the rights of the indigenous peoples of the United States. We applaud the decision by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to deny the pipeline permit under Lake Oahe. I personally offer thanks to all those who have worked to amplify the voices of the people at Standing Rock, calling our attention to historic wrongs and injustices, and urging us all to consider a new vision for how we might love God, love each other, and love the earth.

I am grateful and humbled by the water protectors of Standing Rock, whose faithful witness serves as an example of moral courage, spiritual integrity, and genuine concern for the entire human family and God's creation. I am equally appreciative of the sacrifice and example of the military veterans, interfaith clergy, and trauma chaplains who accompanied the water protectors during critical moments of the struggle, many of whom have pledged to remain as long as the water protectors are present.

Our whole Church should offer special thanksgiving to Father John Floberg of the Diocese of North Dakota, who so effectively organized Episcopalians and other people of faith in this effort, and to clergy and lay people who committed themselves to standing with the water protectors – both physically and in spirit.

Even as many of us celebrate this historic announcement, we must look to the mighty tasks that lay ahead. In the next eighteen months, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will conduct an Environmental Impact Assessment and explore alternative routes for the Dakota Access Pipeline. We ask that the assessment involve extensive consultation with affected populations, and that any plan going forward honor treaty obligations with the Standing Rock Sioux. We will also urge the current and incoming presidential administration to launch a thorough Department of Justice investigation into the use of brutal force by law enforcement on Standing Rock. Our work is not over, and the Episcopal Church has a critical role to play in ensuring a just and humane outcome is fully realized.

We recognize that this struggle for the protection of water and of the basic human rights of indigenous people is one moment in a wider movement for social and environmental justice. May we in this way bear true witness to the words of the holy prophet Micah, who said:

 

"He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you

but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?" (Micah 6:8)

 

 

 The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry
 Presiding Bishop and Primate
 The Episcopal Church

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement on the news concerning the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation:   This morning, the sun ascended over the Great Plains of our nation, and hope truly dawned...

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement on the news concerning the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation:

 

This morning, the sun ascended over the Great Plains of our nation, and hope truly dawned anew.

After months of courageously and peacefully working to prevent the laying of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which posed potential danger to the water supply of the people of the Sioux Nation and transgressed their sacred burial grounds, the water protectors on Standing Rock have won a notable victory. Yesterday afternoon, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced their decision to deny an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline’s construction across the sacred land and water of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and this long-awaited announcement is cause for joyful celebration and thanks.

On behalf of the Episcopal Church, I offer my gratitude to President Barack Obama and his Administration for championing the rights of the indigenous peoples of the United States. We applaud the decision by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to deny the pipeline permit under Lake Oahe. I personally offer thanks to all those who have worked to amplify the voices of the people at Standing Rock, calling our attention to historic wrongs and injustices, and urging us all to consider a new vision for how we might love God, love each other, and love the earth.

I am grateful and humbled by the water protectors of Standing Rock, whose faithful witness serves as an example of moral courage, spiritual integrity, and genuine concern for the entire human family and God's creation. I am equally appreciative of the sacrifice and example of the military veterans, interfaith clergy, and trauma chaplains who accompanied the water protectors during critical moments of the struggle, many of whom have pledged to remain as long as the water protectors are present.

Our whole Church should offer special thanksgiving to Father John Floberg of the Diocese of North Dakota, who so effectively organized Episcopalians and other people of faith in this effort, and to clergy and lay people who committed themselves to standing with the water protectors – both physically and in spirit.

Even as many of us celebrate this historic announcement, we must look to the mighty tasks that lay ahead. In the next eighteen months, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will conduct an Environmental Impact Assessment and explore alternative routes for the Dakota Access Pipeline. We ask that the assessment involve extensive consultation with affected populations, and that any plan going forward honor treaty obligations with the Standing Rock Sioux. We will also urge the current and incoming presidential administration to launch a thorough Department of Justice investigation into the use of brutal force by law enforcement on Standing Rock. Our work is not over, and the Episcopal Church has a critical role to play in ensuring a just and humane outcome is fully realized.

We recognize that this struggle for the protection of water and of the basic human rights of indigenous people is one moment in a wider movement for social and environmental justice. May we in this way bear true witness to the words of the holy prophet Micah, who said:

 

"He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you

but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?" (Micah 6:8)

 

 

 The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry
 Presiding Bishop and Primate
 The Episcopal Church

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement on the news concerning the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation:   This morning, the sun ascended over the Great Plains of our nation, and hope truly dawned...

Applications are now accepted for the 2017 United Thank Offering grants.  The application forms are available here.

The focus for the 2017 United Thank Offering grants is Evangelism – Reconciliation: Following Jesus’ way of creating loving, liberating, and life-giving relationships with God, each other, and all creation.

“This is the Jesus Movement and the United Thank Offering is a part of the Jesus Movement,” commented Sandra K. Squires, Ed.D., United Thank Offering Board President. “Join us as the United Thank Offering continues its tradition of thankfulness by awarding grants for 2017.”

Known worldwide as UTO, the United Thank Offering grants are awarded for projects that address human needs and help alleviate poverty, both domestically and internationally in the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion. United Thank Offering was founded to support innovative mission and ministry that the Episcopal Church budget has not yet expanded to fund and to promote thankfulness and mission in the whole Church.  The funds are not permitted for the continuation of ongoing ministries.

Detailed guidelines for applying for the grants are here. The deadline is 5 pm Eastern on March 3, 2017.

The list of allowable and projects not eligible are listed here.

Important notes

The guidelines in detail are available here.
 

Please note:

The United Thank Offering will accept:

  • grant applications for start-up costs of a new ministry.
  • one grant application per diocese within The Episcopal Church;
  • one additional application for a companion grant from a diocese of The Episcopal Church may be submitted. This relationship may be formed with an aided diocese from The Episcopal Church or with a diocese from The Anglican Communion. The sponsoring bishop with jurisdiction will be responsible for the accounting of the grant.

For more information about guidelines and applications, contact the Rev. Heather Melton, Missioner for United Thank Offering.

Applications are now accepted for the 2017 United Thank Offering grants.  The application forms are available here. The focus for the 2017 United Thank Offering grants is Evangelism – Reconciliation: Following Jesus’ way of creating loving,...
Tagged in: positions

The Episcopal Church is accepting applications for the position of Partnership Officer for Asia and the Pacific, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff.

In this full-time position, the Partnership Officer for Asia and the Pacific nurtures Episcopal Church relationships with Anglican Communion partners in the region and works with the Episcopal Church’s office for Ecumenical and Interreligious relations.  The Officer is a resource for parishes, dioceses and institutions, and is a bridge in nurturing and promoting relationships with this region. Extensive overseas travel is key to this position.

More information and application instructions for this position are available here.

Deadline for applying is Friday, December 23.

For more information contact a member of the Episcopal Church Human Resources Team at hrm@episcopalchurch.org.

The Episcopal Church values diversity of culture and thought and seeks talented, qualified employees regardless of race, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, gender identity and expression, or any other protected classification under Federal, State or Municipal law as well as the Canons of the Episcopal Church and resolutions of the Episcopal Church General Convention.  We are proud to be an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

The Episcopal Church is accepting applications for the position of Partnership Officer for Asia and the Pacific, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff. In this full-time position, the Partnership Officer for Asia and the Pacific nurtures...

Throughout December, Episcopal Migration Ministries is offering weekly Advent Reflection videos available here, with a focus on the refugee resettlement work of the Episcopal Church.

“We invite you into the journey of Advent with us, as we reflect on this important season and the ministry of resettlement and welcome,” noted the Rev. Canon E. Mark Stevenson, Director of Episcopal Migration Ministries.

Advent is the liturgical season that occurs four weeks prior to Christmas.

“The videos are based on the Sunday scripture readings and their connection to the refugee resettlement ministry of the Episcopal Church,” Stevenson continued. “They offer an opportunity to reflect on how God is calling us to “aid all refugees” in the name of the Holy One.

#SupportRefugees

Also throughout December, people are invited to display support for refugee resettlement ministry through social media. Simply take a Selfie using the words #SupportRefugees and indicate on paper: I #SupportRefugees because…” and post to Facebook, Instagram, and/or Twitter. Email a copy of your Selfie to Kendall Martin to have your support shared on the official Episcopal Migration Ministries Facebook page.

This year, the Episcopal Church, in partnership with congregations, volunteers and our network of 30 local affiliate offices in 22 states will welcome more than 6,000 refugees to the United States from 32 countries.

For more information contact Martin, Communications Manager of Episcopal Migration Ministries.

Throughout December, Episcopal Migration Ministries is offering weekly Advent Reflection videos available here, with a focus on the refugee resettlement work of the Episcopal Church. “We invite you into the journey of Advent with us, as we reflect...

The following is the letter sent on November 30 by Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry to North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple and Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier concerning the situation at the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.

 

November 30, 2016

 

Dear Governor Dalrymple and Sheriff Kirchmeier:

 

I pray that this letter finds you well, and I want to assure you of my prayers.  It has been my privilege to visit and learn firsthand about the Standing Rock Sioux Nation and the Dakota Access Pipeline, and I appreciate the complexity of the conflict you currently manage.

The Episcopal Church is grateful to stand with the people of Standing Rock in their efforts to respect and protect the Missouri River and the sacred burial grounds of the Sioux Nation. We do so seeking to follow the way of Jesus of Nazareth who taught us that love of God and love of our neighbor is the highest moral law and religious duty (Matthew 22:37-40, Luke 10:25-37).

Hundreds of Episcopal clergy and lay leaders have traveled with other people of faith to Standing Rock over the past several months to bear non-violent witness to the water-protection efforts underway near Sacred Stone Camp. Reports from the ground from our own members present alarming accounts of undue force used by law enforcement against the water protectors.

Given the November 25 notice from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as well as Governor Dalrymple’s November 28 executive order, I urge you to monitor the nature and tone of the policing actions by local and state law enforcement, the National Guard, and private contractors.  I also ask that you take action to address and stop the use of water cannons and rubber bullets, as well as the use of military equipment that escalates tensions between the parties.  I am deeply concerned about the number of protectors who have been injured, and the potential loss of life that could result from the continued use of these tactics.

A delegation of approximately 30 chaplains trained to assist people experiencing trauma will be standing with the water protectors in the coming days, especially as veterans also gather this weekend to stand with Standing Rock. These religious chaplains are called to care for those who are wounded, traumatized, or seeking spiritual support; they have pledged not to participate in demonstration activities. As they carry out their work, I ask that you safeguard them, ensuring that they meet no harm or violence as they seek to bring healing to all those gathered at Standing Rock.

I close once again asking your patience, attention and respect for the people and communities in your care. Please trust that we will keep you in our prayers moving forward. If our church may be of assistance in the creation of a peaceful and just way forward, I would welcome that invitation.

Faithfully,

 

The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop and Primate of the Episcopal Church

 

 

The following is the letter sent on November 30 by Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry to North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple and Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier concerning the situation at the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.  ...

The Office of the Presiding Bishop announced today that it was releasing a letter from  Presiding Bishop Michael Curry to the Rt. Rev. Zache Duracin, the Rt. Rev. Oge Beauviour and The Rev. Dr. Kesner Ajax, President of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Haiti.

The letter follows:

Dear Bishop Duracin, Bishop Beauvoir, Dr. Ajax:

I greet you in Jesus Christ with the apostolic words of St. Paul:

"So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation." (2 Corinthians 5:17-18)

As baptized disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ in the Episcopal Church we have been summoned into being by him, to proclaim and to share his Gospel, to make disciples of all nations, and to be instruments of God's reconciliation and healing for the hurts of the world.

I write now in a context in which there is hurt and brokenness in the church, the body of Christ. We are all a part of Christ's body. The hurt and brokenness affects us all, and I include myself, as your Presiding Bishop, in that company. As St. Paul said in the epistle to the Romans, "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God." But he goes on to say in Romans that where sin and brokenness increase, the grace of God in the Jesus Christ abounds all the more. God's grace is greater and God's Spirit is stronger than our deepest hurts and most profound wounds. So now let us fall on our knees before the Lord and call on that Grace, that Spirit, that power to help, to heal, to restore and renew, to save and to set us free!

The task before us now is to work together in the Holy Spirit to attain the greatest degree of healing and reconciliation that is possible in the Diocese of Haiti and our wider Episcopal Church. And this we do not for our sake alone, but for the sake of the people of Haiti, the ministry of the Diocese of Haiti, the wider Episcopal Church, and the very integrity of our witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ itself.

All that I say in what follows is with that goal in mind -- to work toward the greatest degree of healing and reconciliation possible. There may be aspects in what I say below that some will disagree with. I accept that. But acknowledging that, it is important to remember that the goal is greater than all else. So, I am asking us all to commit ourselves to the goal of working toward the highest and greatest degree of healing and reconciliation possible! For God has entrusted us with the ministry of reconciliation, not only in the world, but in the church.

In numerous statements and conversations since I became Presiding Bishop, and more recently when I was meeting in Haiti with Bishop Duracin and the Standing Committee of your diocese in late August, I have stressed what may be obvious to some but bears repeating again and again: that the troubles that have faced and continue to face the Diocese of Haiti are of grave concern, not only to me and other bishops, but to countless others throughout the Church who have had and continue to have a strong interest in helping the Diocese do its crucial ministry. And so, it is troubling that on top of the burdens placed upon the Diocese from natural and economic forces, serious divisions have arisen in the Diocese – divisions between the two bishops and divisions among the clergy and, undoubtedly, the laity.

Sadly, as we discussed in Haiti, some of those divisions have led to the pending disciplinary proceeding under Title IV of the canons against the Bishop Diocesan, largely stimulated by allegations made by the Bishop Suffragan. Since our meeting, it has become even clearer that this proceeding will continue to move toward an unflattering public trial within the next few months -- with painful allegations by both bishops against each other and testimony by clergy of the Diocese as witnesses on both sides -- unless a way can be found to resolve it amicably. Moreover, since our meeting, divisions among the lay and clerical leadership of the Diocese embodied in both the Bishop Diocesan and the Standing Committee, on the one hand, and the Bishop Suffragan, on the other, have led to the recent filing by the Standing Committee of the petition under Title III of the Church’s canons requesting that I begin the canonical process by which the pastoral relation between the Diocese and the Bishop Suffragan may now be involuntarily dissolved.

I believe that my responsibilities as Presiding Bishop, both pastoral and canonical, direct me to exert every reasonable effort to find ways to make substantial progress in healing these divisions before further damage is done to the Diocese and the larger Church. As the most pressing and immediate challenge, I believe that all concerned must work together toward a prompt, amicable and pastorally acceptable resolution of both the foregoing canonical proceedings.

This effort now seems to me to be all the more crucial in the light of the fact that the Bishop Diocesan will be retiring within the next few years and, indeed, since our meeting, has called for the election of a Bishop Coadjutor. How important it is that that election be conducted by a diocese that is healthy and generous of spirit cannot be overstated.

At the Haiti meeting discussed above, I promised to help develop and implement two processes in the furtherance of reconciliation and restoration of the health of the Diocese. The first was to appoint representatives of DFMS to work with representatives of the Diocese in creating a new “memorandum of understanding” relating to the joint efforts of the Diocese and the DFMS in future development projects, with a focus on joint decision making and sound and responsible financial practices. I am pleased that, with good-faith efforts on the part of representatives of both the Diocese and the DFMS, agreement on such a memorandum was quickly reached and is now being implemented. That is a significant accomplishment that creates the basis for equal partnership in mission, for the sake of the Gospel and the people of Haiti. Thank you to all who worked to achieve this.

The second was to develop a process for new conversations that would focus directly and specifically on the divisions among the bishops and the Standing Committee and divisions among the clergy. After giving this matter considerable thought and prayer, I have determined to appoint a three-person panel to assist me in a series of in-depth conversations with the bishops and clerical and lay leaders of the Diocese in the weeks and months ahead. All three persons whom I have selected, and who have agreed to serve, have had substantial personal experience with the Diocese and are persons in whom I place considerable trust. They are the Rt. Rev. Stephen T. Lane, the Bishop of Maine, whose diocese, as you know, has for some years had a partner relationship with Haiti; the Rev. P. Roger Bowen, a former Headmaster of Episcopal schools who, as you also know, has fostered partner relationships of countless schools in Haiti with Church schools and parishes in our other dioceses; and Paul B. Nix, Jr., Esquire, In-house Counsel for the DFMS in New York, who has worked persistently on specific development projects in Haiti, including the design and legal issues relating to the projected construction of a new Cathedral, as well as on the memorandum of understanding referred to above.

As I told Bishops Duracin and Beauvoir by telephone last week, I have asked this panel to begin its efforts with discussions with each of the bishops separately in the Church Headquarters in New York by the end of this month. I shall ask the panel to arrange a meeting with members of the Standing Committee promptly thereafter. After the members of the panel have then met with me to reflect upon the issues raised by these discussions, I shall design the next phase of this process.

I am appreciative of and encouraged by the fact that in my recent conversations with both of my brother bishops each assured me that he wished to work toward reconciliation. I thank them and thank God for that willingness.

Pursuant to my canonical responsibilities referred to above and my defined role as Chief Pastor, I am asking all involved to give this process all strength of effort and good will. Ultimately, however, I ask this of us all, in obedience to our Lord who has, as St. Paul said, entrusted us with God's ministry of reconciliation.

Allow me to offer the prayer of St. Francis.

Lord, make us instruments of your peace. Where there is hatred, let us sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is discord, union; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy. Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. Amen.

Your brother in Christ,

The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry
Presiding Bishop and Primate of the Episcopal Church

 

 

The Office of the Presiding Bishop announced today that it was releasing a letter from  Presiding Bishop Michael Curry to the Rt. Rev. Zache Duracin, the Rt. Rev. Oge Beauviour and The Rev. Dr. Kesner Ajax, President of the Standing Committee of...