The Public Affairs Office

The Public Affairs Office

The Public Affairs Office provides statistics, biographies, photos, background information, and other resources to media representatives reporting on the mission and ministries of the Episcopal Church.

The Toolkit:
The Toolkit of the Public Affairs Office is designed for your use to help enhance your message, broaden your reach and offer tips for placements into regional, secular, and other media – both traditional and social. It is located on the Public Affairs pages of the Episcopal Church website here.

Subscribe to the Public Affairs Office’s e-mail lists to receive the latest information about The Episcopal Church. "Media Releases" provides up-to-the-minute information about news, events, and resources from The Episcopal Church. The "Daily Scan" is a daily list of links to news stories in the mass media that highlight The Episcopal Church, Episcopal parishes and dioceses, and Episcopalians. Subscribe here.

On Thursday, August 25, Thursdays at 2 will feature Seattle-based musician Mike Notter addressing his feelings of being drawn to the Church of the Apostle in the Diocese of Olympia.

The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned.

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here 

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Reflections by Brother Geoffrey
  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • I am a missionary: The Rev. Jimmy Bartz
  • Potluck Dinners
  • Jericho Road
  • Jennifer Caldwell  and Episcopal Moments
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table
  • Missional Voices
  • Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on World Refugee Day 2016
  • Church on the Square in Baltimore
  • Episcopal Church Advocacy
  • Missional Communities
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes, a food truck ministry in the Diocese of Rhode Island
  • Re-membering and Re- Imagining, a report from the House of Bishops.
  • Double Down on Love, an original song from the Thad's Band in Santa Monica, CA, Diocese of Los Angeles
  • The Slate Project, an Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation that exists online and in person.
  • The Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Reconciliation and Evangelism, providing an update on recent church planting meetings.
  • The Rev. Scott Claasan of St Michael’s University Church reflecting on how music and surfing led him back to church. 

 

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

 

 
On Thursday, August 25, Thursdays at 2 will feature Seattle-based musician Mike Notter addressing his feelings of being drawn to the Church of the Apostle in the Diocese of Olympia. The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned...

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement in support of the advocacy of the people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

 

“Water is a gift from the creator, respect it, and protect it.”  I was deeply moved by these words printed on the sign of a person standing with hundreds of others to protect the Missouri River.  In the Episcopal Church, when we baptize a new follower of Jesus Christ, we pray these words over the water of baptism.  “We thank you, Almighty God, for the gift of water.” We then recall how God used water to bless his people in the Bible, from the story of creation in Genesis, the emancipation of Hebrew slaves in Exodus, to the baptism of the Lord Jesus in the River Jordan.  Indeed, “Water is a gift from the creator.” To sustain it and to protect it is to “safeguard the integrity of God’s creation,” and therefore to protect human and other forms of life created by Almighty God.  That work warrants our full and prayerful support.

The people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, standing in solidarity with hundreds of other indigenous nations and allies, are calling us anew to respect and protect this sacred gift of God, and in so doing to respect and protect God's gift of human life.  In protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, they recognize the gift of water to all of us, a gift given to us by our Creator.  The Sioux remind us “mni wiconi” or “water is life.” This God-given resource courses through our mighty rivers and our human veins, working to renew and reinvigorate all of creation.

We are called to do our part to urge decision makers to recognize and honor the efforts to protect the sacred water and burial grounds threatened by the Dakota Access Pipeline. The Pipeline, if completed, would stretch over one thousand miles and transport 540,000 barrels of crude oil through hallowed North Dakota burial grounds every day. A rupture in its infrastructure could wreak untold havoc on the Sioux and catastrophically pollute the Missouri River, a sacred tributary that the Sioux people depend upon for their daily water. 

I stand with the people of Standing Rock in their efforts to respect and protect the Missouri River. We know that the right to clean water is an internationally recognized human right and that all too often indigenous communities, other people of color, and our most vulnerable communities throughout the world are the ones most at risk of losing access to clean water.  As we join the people of Standing Rock, we also recognize that their stand is one that joins the fight for racial justice and reconciliation with climate justice and caring for God's creation as a matter of stewardship.

This stand of men, women and children is also an important moment in the life of indigenous people. The Sioux people’s advocacy efforts to protect the Missouri River and the sacred burial grounds threatened by the oil pipeline is truly historic.  Leaders of Standing Rock observe that it’s been over 140 years since such a unified call for respect and justice has been made.  The Episcopal Church has a long record of advocating that government, corporations and other societal players respect the treaty rights of Native peoples. Standing alongside our Sioux brothers and sisters, we continue this legacy today.

The people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation are calling us now to stand with Native peoples, not only for their sakes, but for the sake of God’s creation, for the sake of the entire human family, and for the children and generations of children yet unborn. The legendary Sioux Chief Sitting Bull reminds us: “Let us put our minds together and see what life we can make for our children.”  There is the urgent need of this calling.

So, while we cannot all physically stand in the Camp of Sacred Stones today, let us hold, both in spoken word and silent prayer, the aspirations of the Sioux people and urge our policymakers to protect and responsibly steward our water, the sacred gift from God that sustains us all.

 

 

  +Michael B. Curry
  Presiding Bishop and Primate
  The Episcopal Church

 

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has issued the following statement in support of the advocacy of the people of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.   “Water is a gift from the creator, respect it, and protect it.”  I was...

Twenty young adults representing 18 Episcopal Church dioceses are serving as missionaries in the Young Adult Service Corps (YASC) for the 2016-2017 term in locales throughout the Anglican Communion. Five of them are continuing their ministries with YASC for a second year.

YASC is a ministry of the Episcopal Church for young adults, ages 21 - 30, who are interested in exploring their faith in new ways by living and serving in communities around the Anglican Communion.

Each YASC missionary maintains a blog, detailing his/her service, reflections and adventures. Elizabeth Boe, Episcopal Church Global Networking Officer and a former YASC missionary who served in Tanzania, said blogs enable the young adults to serve as evangelists both in their host dioceses and at home.

 

Meet the YASC missionaries

The 15 YASC missionaries, their home dioceses, host dioceses, and blog addresses are:

 

Adrienne Davis, Diocese of Southern Virginia

Adrienne is serving with Helpers for Domestic Helpers at St. John’s Cathedral in the Diocese of Hong Kong Island.  Her blog is here http://adrienneyasc.blogspot.com/

 

Lexy Fields, Diocese of Florida

Lexy is teaching at Hogar Escuela in the Diocese of Costa Rica.  Her blog is here http://unityconstancypeace.blogspot.com/  

 

Alexa Henault, Diocese of Rhode Island

Alexa is teaching at Hogar Escuela in the Diocese of Costa Rica.  Her blog is here http://alexasyascyear.blogspot.com/

 

Mitch Honan, Diocese of Connecticut

Mitch is teaching at the St Barnabas Agricultural Center in the Diocese of Haiti.  His blog is here http://mitchhonanhaiti.blogspot.com/  

 

Zach Jeffers, Diocese of Upper South Carolina

Zach is serving with Mission to Seafarers in the Diocese of Western Kowloon, Hong Kong.  His blog is here  http://zjeffersyasc.blogspot.com/

 

Kate Jewett-Williams, Diocese of Dallas and Diocese of Oklahoma

Kate is serving with Tsedaqah Community Ministry in the Diocese of Liverpool.  Her blog is here http://theforeigncommission.blogspot.com/

 

Jourdan Johnson, Diocese of Connecticut

Jourdan is working with social services outreach in the Diocese of Southwestern Brazil.  Her blog is here http://yascbrazil2016.blogspot.com/

 

Jack Karn, Diocese of Vermont

Jack is working with Jerusalem Peace Builders in the Diocese of Jerusalem.  His blog is here http://servingintheholyland.blogspot.com/

 

Emily Kirk, Diocese of East Tennessee

Emily is serving with Tsedaqah Community Ministry in the Diocese of Liverpool. Her blog is here http://ekirkyasc.blogspot.com/

 

Elijah Lewis, Diocese of Upper South Carolina

Elijah is implementing projects at the St Barnabas Agricultural Center in the Diocese of Haiti.  His blog is here http://etlewisyasc.blogspot.com/

 

Kellan Lyman, Diocese of Atlanta

Kellan is working with the ECARE Foundation in the Diocese of Northern Philippines.  Her blog is here http://kellaninthephilippines.blogspot.com/

 

Wil Merchant, Episcopal Church in South Carolina

Wil is serving with the Asian Rural Institute in the Anglican Church in Japan.  His blog is here http://wilinjapan.blogspot.com/

 

Charles Merchant, Episcopal Church in South Carolina

Charles is serving with the Holy Cross School in the Diocese of Grahamstown, South Africa.  His blog is here http://cemerch1.blogspot.com/

 

Brooklyn Payne, Diocese of Missouri

She is serving with the Bella Vista Girls Home in the Diocese of Panama.  Her blog is here http://brooklynyasc2016.blogspot.com/

 

Tristan Tucker, Diocese of Springfield

Tristan is teaching at All Saints’ School in the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Philippines. His blog is here https://tristaninphilippines.blogspot.com/

 

All the blogs are here: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/content/blogs/yasc

 

Second Year YASCers

The five YASC missionaries who are serving a second year, their home dioceses, host dioceses and blog addresses are:

 

Naomi Cunningham, Diocese of Kansas

Naomi is serving a second year with the American Cathedral in Paris in the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. Her blog is here http://afearandadreampart2.blogspot.com/

 

Tristan Holmberg, Diocese of Kansas

Tristan is serving a second year with the ECARE Foundation in the Diocese of Northern Luzon, Philippines. His blog is here https://tristanholmberg.blogspot.com/

 

Rachel McDaniel, Diocese of West Tennessee

Rachel is the Julia Chester Emery United Thank Offering 2016-17 intern. Her blog is here http://ramcdaniel.blogspot.com/

 

James Rose, Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, Diocese of Georgia

James is serving a second year with Mission to Seafarers in Kobe, Japan. His blog is here http://jamesroseyasc.blogspot.com/

 

Bryan Vélez García, Diocese of Puerto Rico

Bryan is serving a second year at Church of the Holy Trinity in the Diocese of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His blog is here http://brvelez.blogspot.com/

 

 

Twenty young adults representing 18 Episcopal Church dioceses are serving as missionaries in the Young Adult Service Corps (YASC) for the 2016-2017 term in locales throughout the Anglican Communion. Five of them are continuing their ministries with...
Tagged in: Federal Ministries

Three nominees have been announced for Episcopal Church Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries.

With an office based in Washington DC, the Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries is a member of the staff of Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry.

The three nominees are:

  • The Rev. Christopher Garcia, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Greenwood VA, Diocese of Virginia.  A career Army officer, he retired after 25 years of service in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps with the rank of Colonel. He was deployed to Saudi Arabia and Iraq for Desert Shield and Desert Storm, and retired as Colonel.
     
  • The Rev. David McElwain, Veterans Administration staff chaplain in Cheyenne, Diocese of Wyoming.  A retired Navy Commander, among his military posts he served as Pastoral Care Chaplain at the Naval Hospital Jacksonville, FL and as Command Chaplain, Supervisory Chaplain, and Battle Group Chaplain, USS Nassau Amphibious Ready Group.
  • The Rev. Carl Wright, St. Andrew’s Church, Pasadena, MD, Diocese of Maryland. In his military career, he has served as Deputy Command Chaplain for the Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC) at Barksdale AFB, LA. Commissioned an Air Force Chaplain in August 1993, Lieutenant Colonel Wright is an Associate Member of the Anglican religious Order of the Holy Cross (OHC).

The election is slated for the fall meeting of the House of Bishops in September. According to Episcopal Church Constitution Article II sec. 7, the House of Bishops who have gathered for the session will elect the Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries. The successful nominee must garner at least 50% of the total votes plus 1.

Christopher Weaver, Rear Admiral, US Navy-retired, is the chair of the search committee.  Members of the committee are: Major General Razz Waff, USA (Ret); Chaplain (Col) Paul Minor, USANG; Col Stephen Dalzell, USA (Ret); Chaplain (Col) Carl Andrews, USAF (Ret); Chaplain Marion Thullbery, Department of Veterans Affairs; Chaplain Christine Waweru, Federal Bureau of Prisons.

 For more information contact Weaver at chrisweaver1@att.net, or Maggie Mount  mmount@episcopalchurch.org.

 

Three nominees have been announced for Episcopal Church Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries. With an office based in Washington DC, the Bishop Suffragan for Armed Services and Federal Ministries is a member of the staff of...

“Voting and participation in our government is a way of participating in our common life,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry said in a video election message.  “And that is a Christian obligation.  Indeed, we who follow in the Way of Jesus of Nazareth are summoned to participate actively as reflections of our faith in the civil process.”

The Presiding Bishop’s video election message is here. The video is closed-captioned and is subtitled in Spanish. The text of the Presiding Bishop’s message in English and Spanish is located at the end of this note.

The video is ideal for conversation, adult forums and group gatherings, Sunday School, youth groups, conventions, and meetings, etc.

Election Toolkit and resources

The Episcopal Church online toolkit with webpage outlines how individual Episcopalians and congregations can participate in the electoral process through nonpartisan activities. Among the possible non-partisan activities offered are: engaging young adults who are eligible to vote for the first time; hosting a candidate forum; advocating for voting rights legislation; and hosting Get Out The Vote campaigns. Through the Episcopal Public Policy Network (EPPN), information is also available on an important initiative, the Episcopal Pledge to Vote

  • Election engagement resources, including the downloadable Episcopal Election Engagement Toolkit, are available here
  • A Facebook/Twitter social media campaign highlighting: state-by-state registration deadlines; information on voting rights; ways to support civil discourse; and historical fun facts of Episcopal political engagement through the centuries of our country. Facebook here and Twitter here
     
  • Hashtag #EpiscopaliansVote

 

 

 

 

The Presiding Bishop’s message in English follows:

 

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

Election Message

 

 

This November we will gather together as a nation to vote not only to elect a new president but to elect governmental leaders on a variety of levels. 

We are blessed.  We are blessed as a nation to be able to do so as citizens of this country.  This is a right, an obligation, and a duty.  And indeed the right and the privilege to be able to vote is something that was won through an American revolution.  Something that was won even more through civil rights and women’s suffrage.  A right and a privilege that was won for all.  So I encourage you to please go and vote.  Vote your conscience.  Vote your perspective.  But vote.

But it’s not just simply a civil obligation and duty.  Voting and participation in our government is a way of participating in our common life.  And that is a Christian obligation.  Indeed, we who follow in the Way of Jesus of Nazareth are summoned to participate actively as reflections of our faith in the civil process. 

In the thirteenth chapter of Romans, sometimes a chapter that is debated among scholars and among Christians, St. Paul reminds us that we have a duty and an obligation to participate in the process of government, “For that is how our common life is ordered and structured.”  And at one point he actually says, “For the same reason,” going on, he’s expanding, he says, “For the same reason you also pay taxes for the authorities are God’s servants, busy with everything.”  That’s probably very true.  “Pay to all them that is due them.  Taxes to whom taxes are due.  Revenue to whom revenue is due.  Respect to whom respect is due.  Honor to whom honor is due.”  Now he’s talking about the role of government as helping to order our common life.  But here’s what I want you to really hear.  He continues and says: 

 

“So owe no-one anything except to love one another.  For the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.  The commandments ‘You shall not commit adultery’, ‘You shall not murder’, ‘You shall not steal’, ‘You shall not covet’, any other commandment, they are all summed up in this word:  ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’.  Love does no wrong to a neighbor, therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.” 

 

For St. Paul, the way of love, the love of neighbor, is the fulfilling not only of the moral law of God, but the way to fulfill the civil law. 

Go and vote.  Vote your conscience.  Your conscience informed by what it means to love your neighbor.  To participate in the process of seeking the common good.  To participate in the process of making this a better world.  However you vote, go and vote.  And do that as a follower of Jesus. 

 

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

 

 

The Presiding Bishop’s message in Spanish follows:

 

Obispo Presidente Michael Curry
Mensaje sobre las elecciones

 

Este mes de noviembre nos reuniremos como nación para votar, no solo para elegir un nuevo presidente, sino para elegir a líderes gubernamentales en una variedad de niveles.

Somos bendecidos. Somos bendecidos como nación por ser capaces de hacerlo como ciudadanos de este país. Esto es un derecho, una obligación y un deber. Y en verdad el derecho y el privilegio de poder votar es algo que se obtuvo mediante una revolución americana. Algo que fue logrado, aún más, a través de los derechos civiles y el sufragio femenino. Un derecho y un privilegio que fue conseguido por todos. Así que les animo a que, por favor, vayan y voten. Voten su conciencia. Voten su perspectiva. Pero voten.

Pero no es simplemente una obligación civil y un deber. El votar y participar en nuestro gobierno es una forma de colaborar en la vida común. Y eso es una obligación cristiana. Verdaderamente, a los que seguimos en el Camino de Jesús de Nazaret se nos pide que participemos activamente como reflejo de nuestra fe en el proceso civil.

En el capítulo trece de la Carta a los Romanos, -un capítulo que a veces se debate entre los académicos y entre los cristianos-, san Pablo nos recuerda que tenemos el deber y la obligación de participar en el proceso del gobierno, "pues así es cómo nuestra vida en común está ordenada y estructurada". Y en realidad llega a decir: "Por la misma razón", continúa, lo amplía, y dice: "por la misma razón ustedes también pagan los  tributos pues las autoridades son funcionarios al servicio de Dios, encargados de cumplir este oficio". Eso es probablemente muy cierto. "Pagar a cada uno lo que le es debido. Al que se le deben impuestos, impuestos. Al que se le debe contribución, contribución. Al que se le debe respecto, respeto. Al que honor, honor". Ahora está hablando de la función del gobierno en cuanto ayuda a ordenar nuestra vida en común. Pero aquí está lo que de verdad quiero que oigan. Continúa y dice:

"Así que la única deuda que tengan  con los demás  sea la del amor mutuo. Porque el que ama al prójimo ya cumplió toda la ley. Los mandamientos: 'No cometerás adulterio', 'No matarás', 'No robarás', 'No codiciarás', y cualquier otro mandamiento, todos están resumidos en esta palabra: 'Amarás al prójimo como a ti mismo'. El amor no hace mal al prójimo, por eso, el amor es el cumplimiento de la ley”.

Para san Pablo, el camino del amor, del amor al prójimo, es el cumplimiento no sólo de la ley moral de Dios, sino la manera de cumplir la ley civil.Top of Form

Vayan y voten. Voten su conciencia. Su conciencia informada por lo que significa amar al vecino. Participen en el proceso de la búsqueda del bien común. Participen en el proceso de hacer de este un mundo mejor. Comoquiera que voten, vayan y voten. Y hagan eso como seguidores de Jesús.

 

El Reverendísimo Michael B. Curry
Obispo Presidente y Primado

Iglesia Episcopal

 

 

 
“Voting and participation in our government is a way of participating in our common life,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry said in a video election message.  “And that is a Christian obligation.  Indeed, we who follow in...

Applications are now accepted for the Episcopal Church Missioner for Indigenous Ministries, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff.

The Missioner for Indigenous Ministries enables and empowers the needs and inclusion of Indigenous peoples and their respective communities within the Episcopal Church. The position’s primary focus is leadership development, education and ministry development opportunities by and for Indigenous peoples by recognizing and empowering the building and emergence of Indigenous leadership at all levels of the Church from within the community.

Detailed position information and application instructions are available here 

Deadline for applying is September 16. 

For more information contact a member of the Episcopal Church Human Resources Team at hrm@episcopalchurch.org.

The position description was developed by a search committee named by Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry to review and edit a position description and to interview candidates. The search committee members are:

  • Judge Richard Ackley, Diocese of Fond du Lac
  • Isaiah Brokenleg, Diocese of Fond du Lac
  • Becky Clark, Diocese of Olympia
  • Bishop Mark Lattime, Diocese of Alaska
  • The Rev. Deacon Lewis Powell, Diocese of Northern California
  • Byron Sloan, Diocese of Arizona
  • The Rev. Rachel Tabor-Hamilton, Diocese of Olympia
  • The Rev. Canon Anthony Guillén, Missioner for Hispanic/Latino Ministries, staff liaison
  • The Rev. Canon Michael Hunn, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Ministry Within The Episcopal Church, and John E. Colón, Director of Human Resources are staff support.

Input welcomed

As the Committee begins to receive and consider applications, input is welcomed from the Church community on areas of importance for this ministry.  To facilitate this process, an online survey has been created and is available here

The Episcopal Church values diversity of culture and thought and seeks talented, qualified employees regardless of race, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, gender identity and expression, or any other protected classification under Federal, State or Municipal law as well as the Canons of the Episcopal Church and resolutions of the Episcopal Church General Convention.  We are proud to be an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

 

Applications are now accepted for the Episcopal Church Missioner for Indigenous Ministries, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff. The Missioner for Indigenous Ministries enables and empowers the needs and inclusion of Indigenous peoples and...

The Episcopal Church is accepting applications for the position of Manager for Language Services, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff.

In this full-time position, the Manager for Language Services will manage all aspects of translation and interpretation activities for the Episcopal Church, including items needed from the Presiding Bishop’s Office, General Convention office, and other church bodies and staff.

More information and application instructions for this position are available here  

Deadline for applying is September 9.

For more information contact a member of the Episcopal Church Human Resources Team at hrm@episcopalchurch.org.

The Episcopal Church values diversity of culture and thought and seeks talented, qualified employees regardless of race, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, gender identity and expression, or any other protected classification under Federal, State or Municipal law as well as the Canons of the Episcopal Church and resolutions of the Episcopal Church General Convention.  We are proud to be an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

The Episcopal Church is accepting applications for the position of Manager for Language Services, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff. In this full-time position, the Manager for Language Services will manage all aspects of translation and...
Tagged in: Jubilee Ministry

Twenty-nine Episcopal Church Jubilee Grants totaling $64,612.30 have been awarded to support mission and ministry in 22 dioceses.

Jubilee Ministries are congregations or agencies with connections to the Episcopal Church, designated by diocesan bishops and affirmed by Executive Council, whose mission work affects the lives of those in need, addressing basic human needs and justice issues.

Grants were awarded in two categories:  Development and Impact.

Development Grant

One Development Grant for $25,000 was awarded to a Jubilee ministry

  • The Diocese of Colombia, COLFORPAZ (Corporacion Lideres Forjadores de Paz): An organization that works for social justice and social outreach which  benefits the most vulnerable sectors and works toward contributing to the peace in Colombia. The grant will be used to implement a microfinancing system, sustainable over time, for vulnerable Columbians.

Impact Grants

Twenty-eight Impact Grants ranging from $750 - $1,500 were awarded to help an existing Jubilee Center succeed, and in their own way be an inspiration among and with those in need.

 

  • Diocese of Atlanta, St. Luke's Episcopal Church, $1,500
  • Diocese of California, Good Samaritan Family Resource Center, $1,500
  • Diocese of Central Florida, St. John the Baptist, $1,500
  • Diocese of Chicago, Shelter Care Ministries, $1,500
  • Diocese of Colorado, Colorado Haiti Project, $1,476
  • Diocese of Colorado, 32nd Avenue Jubilee Center, $1,395
  • Diocese of Dallas, St. Matthew's Cathedral Bishop's Camp, $1,500
  • Diocese of East Tennessee, Family Cornerstones, Inc., $1,500
  • Diocese of Iowa, Laundry Love Muscatine, $1,500
  • Diocese of Kansas, Episcopal Social Services, $1,500
  • Diocese of Missouri, Trinity Food Ministry, $1,500
  • Diocese of New Jersey, Trinity Woodbridge Jubilee Outreach Center, $1,400
  • Diocese of New Jersey, Trinity, Asbury Park, $1,500
  • Diocese of New Jersey, San Jose Episcopal Church, $1,100
  • Diocese of New York, Church of Our Savior, $1,000
  • Diocese of Northern California, Loaves and Britches, $1,500
  • Diocese of Ohio, St. Luke's Episcopal Church, $1,500
  • Diocese of Olympia, St. Joseph - St. John Hunger Ministries, $1,500
  • Diocese of Olympia, Chaplains on the Harbor, $1,500
  • Diocese of Olympia, The Mission to Seafarers, $1,500
  • Diocese of Olympia, The Church of the Good Shepherd, $1,500
  • The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, Baskervill Food Pantry, $1,500
  • Diocese of South Dakota, Bishop Hare Jubilee Center, $1,491.30
  • Diocese of Southeast Florida, Jubilee Center of South Broward, $1,500
  • Diocese of Southeast Florida, Episcopal Mental Health Ministries, $1,500
  • Diocese of Spokane, Noah's Ark Homeless Shelter, $1,500
  • Diocese of Tennessee, Relief for the Homeless, $1,000
  • Diocese of Western Michigan, Benzie County Baby Pantry, $750.00

The review committee for the grants was: Rachel Babbitt, Missioner for Community Engagement in the Episcopal Church in Minnesota; Canon Dr. Steven Nishibayashi, of the diocese of Los Angeles and a member of the Executive Council; the Rev. Dr. Lee Anne Reat, vicar of St. John’s Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Southern Ohio; Bishop Dabney Smith, Bishop of Southwest Florida and a member of Executive Council; and the Rev. Canon E. Mark Stevenson, staff liaison.

Twenty-nine Episcopal Church Jubilee Grants totaling $64,612.30 have been awarded to support mission and ministry in 22 dioceses. Jubilee Ministries are congregations or agencies with connections to the Episcopal Church, designated by diocesan...

On Thursday, August 18, Thursdays at 2 will feature Brother Geoffrey as he reflects on his life as a monk in current times at the Society of St. John in Cambridge, MA.

The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned.

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here 

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • I am a missionary: The Rev. Jimmy Bartz
  • Potluck Dinners
  • Jericho Road
  • Jennifer Caldwell  and Episcopal Moments
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table
  • Missional Voices
  • Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on World Refugee Day 2016
  • Church on the Square in Baltimore
  • Episcopal Church Advocacy
  • Missional Communities
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes, a food truck ministry in the Diocese of Rhode Island
  • Re-membering and Re- Imagining, a report from the House of Bishops.
    Double Down on Love, an original song from the Thad's Band in Santa Monica, CA, Diocese of Los Angeles
  • The Slate Project, an Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation that exists online and in person.
  • The Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Reconciliation and Evangelism, providing an update on recent church planting meetings.
  • The Rev. Scott Claasan of St Michael’s University Church reflecting on how music and surfing led him back to church. 

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

 

On Thursday, August 18, Thursdays at 2 will feature Brother Geoffrey as he reflects on his life as a monk in current times at the Society of St. John in Cambridge, MA. The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned. Thursdays at...

[August 17, 2016] The Episcopal Church is accepting applications for the position of Chief Operating Officer, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff.

The Chief Operating Officer is based in New York City and is a full-time position. The Chief Operating Officer oversees a broad portfolio of responsibilities including the day-to-day operation and management of Human Resources, Information Technology, Buildings and Facilities, and real estate acquisitions. He/she will serve as a senior member of the Presiding Bishop’s leadership team.

As noted in Title I, Canon 1.4.2: (f) Upon joint nomination by the Chair (Presiding Bishop) and the Vice-Chair (President of the House of Deputies), the (Executive) Council shall appoint a Chief Operating Officer who shall serve at the pleasure of, and report and be accountable to, the Chair (Presiding Bishop).

Information about the position, details for applying and process overview are available here.  To apply, please provide your résumé and a cover letter that includes at least three professional references. Materials should be submitted by email to EC-COO@ies-consulting.org. Review of materials will begin immediately and will continue until this position is filled. For more information, contact Dr. George Conway, President, IES Consulting, gconway@ies-consulting.org. IES Consulting has been engaged as the search firm for this position.

The COO Nominating Advisory Committee members and their dioceses are: Bishop Gregory H. Rickel (Olympia), serving as chair of the committee; the Rev. Canon Elizabeth Easton (Nebraska); Dr. Katy George (New Jersey); the Rev. Lang Lowrey (Atlanta); Diane B. Pollard (New York); Steve Smith (Vermont); and Dr. Fredrica Harris Thompsett (Massachusetts).

The Episcopal Church values diversity of culture and thought and seeks talented, qualified employees regardless of race, gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, gender identity and expression, or any other protected classification under Federal, State or Municipal law as well as the Canons of the Episcopal Church and resolutions of the Episcopal Church General Convention.  We are proud to be an Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer.

 

[August 17, 2016] The Episcopal Church is accepting applications for the position of Chief Operating Officer, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff. The Chief Operating Officer is based in New York City and is a full-time position. The Chief...