The Public Affairs Office

The Public Affairs Office provides statistics, biographies, photos, background information, and other resources to media representatives reporting on the mission and ministries of the Episcopal Church.

The Toolkit:
The Toolkit of the Public Affairs Office is designed for your use to help enhance your message, broaden your reach and offer tips for placements into regional, secular, and other media – both traditional and social. It is located on the Public Affairs pages of the Episcopal Church website here.

Subscribe to the Public Affairs Office’s e-mail lists to receive the latest information about The Episcopal Church. "Media Releases" provides up-to-the-minute information about news, events, and resources from The Episcopal Church. The "Daily Scan" is a daily list of links to news stories in the mass media that highlight The Episcopal Church, Episcopal parishes and dioceses, and Episcopalians. Subscribe here.

Tagged in: Church Planting

The Genesis Group/Advisory Group on Church Planting has issued the following call for coaches:

General Convention 2015 Resolution D005 called for and funded a network of leaders who learn together how best to support new ministry developers in the Episcopal Church. As an initiative of Executive Council and working closely with the Presiding Bishop’s staff, the new group of lay and ordained Episcopalians is called Genesis: Cultivating New Ministries in the Episcopal Church. In November, their first churchwide meeting gathered 85 leaders who are starting new churches and innovative ministries.

To support this work, persons with experience in starting new ministries are needed to join a network of persons who can assess the gifts of potential Episcopal entrepreneurs and others who can coach ministry developers.

The Rev. Jane Gerdsen, chair of the Genesis Group, noted, “This is an exciting new moment in the life of the Episcopal Church and we are thrilled by the energy and willingness of the church to follow Jesus in new ways into our communities and neighborhoods. These new churches and communities will need this network of support if they are to grow and thrive.”

"There's no better time than this to be in the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement,” said the Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Evangelism, Reconciliation, and Stewardship of Creation. “So many of us are ready to partner, risk, heal and celebrate the good news in our neighborhoods. So many of us are hungry to fall more deeply in love with Jesus and to create spaces where different people can grow in that love, too. This network will support the people doing that Spirit work.”

Learning from our ecumenical partners in the Lutheran, Methodist, Presbyterian, and other denominations, we have discovered the importance of providing an assessment of potential ministry developers. The assessment is based on extensive research which assists the planter in determining the gifts she or he already possesses and those that will be needed on the team for the ministry to succeed. Then we will need a cadre of International Coaching Federation trained coaches who have experience in this work to provide ongoing support to ministry developers as they begin their work.

Lay and ordained persons who have successfully started at least one new ministry in the Episcopal Church are encouraged to click here and fill out a brief application to let us know of your experience and interest in joining this network. The Episcopal Church will provide training and support to qualified persons interested in joining this network of support to nurture entrepreneurial work.

Members of the Genesis Group/Advisory Group and their dioceses are: the Rev. Jane Gerdsen, chairperson, Southern Ohio; the Rev. Valerie Bailey Fischer, Newark; Erendira Jimenez-Pike, Kentucky; the Rev. Michael Michie, Dallas; the Rev. Alex Montes Vela, Texas; the Rev. Katie Nakamura Rengers, Alabama; the Rev. Zachary Nyein, East Tennessee; the Rev. David Perkins, Lexington; the Rev. Canon Jesus Reyes, El Camino Real; Bishop George Sumner, Jr., Dallas; the Rev. Canon Janet Waggoner, Fort Worth. The Rev. Canon Frank Logue of Georgia and the Rev. Canon Tanya Wallace of Western Massachusetts are liaisons from Executive Council.  Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings are Ex Officio members.  The Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Evangelism, Reconciliation and Creation, is staff advisor. The Rev. Tom Brackett is the staff liaison. 

The Genesis Group/Advisory Group on Church Planting has issued the following call for coaches: General Convention 2015 Resolution D005 called for and funded a network of leaders who learn together how best to support new ministry developers in the...
Tagged in: Grants Roanridge Trust

The application deadline nears for the 2017 Roanridge Trust Award Grants from the Episcopal Church.

The Roanridge Trust Award Grants are provided annually for creative models of leadership development, training and ministries in small towns and rural communities across the Episcopal Church. 

Dioceses, congregations and Episcopal-related organizations and institutions are invited to apply for the grants which generally range from $5,000 to $20,000.

More information, application and instructions in English is here and in Spanish here

Although previous recipients are eligible to apply, priority is given to new applications.

Application deadline is February 3.  Applications must be submitted to roanridge@episcopalchurch.org.

“The Roanridge Trust Award Grants support creative ministry and highlight the many unique ways we encounter and serve Jesus in rural and small towns across our church,” commented the Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Evangelism, Reconciliation and Creation. “The wisdom and models we develop in these sites can help to teach and grow churches everywhere, and they should be celebrated and supported.”

Convened by Spellers, applications will be reviewed by a committee comprised of an Episcopal Church Executive Council member, a member at large, and Episcopal church staff members.

The Roanridge Trust was established by the Cochel family, who originally gave a working farm in Missouri called Roanridge to the Episcopal Church. Income from the trust generates the grant funds.

Questions about the Roanridge Trust and the application process can be addressed to Ann Hercules, Associate for Ministry Beyond the Episcopal Church and Grants.    

 

 

The application deadline nears for the 2017 Roanridge Trust Award Grants from the Episcopal Church. The Roanridge Trust Award Grants are provided annually for creative models of leadership development, training and ministries in small towns and...

On Thursday, January 19, Thursdays at 2 will feature Transforming Churches - St. Paul & the Redeemer in Chicago, IL.

The video is available here

 and is also available closed-captioned

St. Paul & the Redeemer weathered difficult times to emerge as a welcoming church in its diverse community.  Diversity is evident in the church music, community choirs and worship style.

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Ecclesia Ministries Common Cathedral
  • Christ Church in Philadelphia, PA
  • YASCer in Tanzania
  • Two Tables
  • The Food Pantry at St. Gregory Nyssa in San Francisco, CA
  • @OurTable
  • Young Adult Service Corps
  • The Crossing
  • United Thank Offering at St. Paul's Senior Center
  • Amazing Grace
  • St. Thomas Choir School
  • Bridal designer Anne Barge
  • Musician Mike Notter
  • Reflections by Brother Geoffrey
  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • Potluck Dinners
  • Jericho Road
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table
  • Church on the Square in Baltimore
  • Episcopal Church Advocacy
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes, a food truck ministry in the Diocese of Rhode Island
  • The Slate Project, an Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation that exists online and in person.
  • Music and surfing leading back to church. 

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

Transforming Churches - St. Paul & the Redeemer Chicago

On Thursday, January 19, Thursdays at 2 will feature Transforming Churches - St. Paul & the Redeemer in Chicago, IL. The video is available here  and is also available closed-captioned St. Paul & the Redeemer weathered difficult times to...

N. Kurt Barnes, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer, announced that the Episcopal Church Economic Justice Loan Committee (ELJC) recently approved five investments in community development financial intermediaries, totaling $1.4 million.

"We are happy to approve new loans with groups like Main Street Launch and FFCC,” noted Warren Wong, ELJC chair. “Both have innovative programs targeted for their communities.   The EJLC also renewed and increased our commitment for micro-lending in Haiti with Fonkoze."

 

Nebraska Enterprise Fund, Oakland, NE - $300,000  

Nebraska Enterprise Fund’s mission is to support Nebraska micro and small businesses by providing capital, training programs and technical assistance. Nebraska Enterprise Fund envisions a vibrant Nebraska where every small and micro business has an opportunity to excel.

Local Enterprise Assistance Fund (LEAF), Brookline, MA - $250,000  
LEAF’s mission is to promote human and economic development by providing financing and development assistance to community-based and employee-owned businesses that create and save jobs.

Main Street Launch Oakland, CA - $300,000 

Main Street Launch’s mission is to create economic opportunity by empowering entrepreneurs. Through innovative partnerships, Main Street Launch provides business owners with capital, education, and relationships that allow them to flourish.

Finance Fund Capital Corporation, Columbus, OH – $300,000

Finance Fund Capital Corporation, a community development financial institution with a $27 million loan portfolio, is based in Columbus, OH and promotes economic revitalization and community development by providing access to capital.

Fonkozé – Port-au-Prince, Haiti  - $250,000

Dubbed Haiti's largest microfinance institution, this loan is the second made by the EJLC.  The main organization is based in Washington, DC.

 

Economic Justice Loan Committee

The Economic Justice Loan Fund is an economic justice ministry through which the Episcopal Church part of its investment assets to provide capital for communities and groups that lack full and equal access to financial resources.  Loans have been made in the United States and internationally to support community economic development, affordable housing, job creation and other avenues of mission.  The Fund was created in 1998 by the Executive Council.  It combines two prior loan programs that had existed since 1988 and makes up to $7 million available. Loans are made to financial intermediaries, usually in amounts between $150,000 and $350,000, and usually for terms of three to five years.  Loan applicants do not have to be affiliated with the Episcopal Church; however, applicants and recipients must have the endorsement of their local Episcopal bishop.  Loans are not made to individuals or for individual projects.  

 

Members

Members and their dioceses are:  Warren Wong, Chair, California; Dianne Aid, Olympia; the Rev. Kimberly Jackson, Atlanta; the Very Rev. Will Mebane, Western New York; Bishop Rodney Michel, Pennsylvania; the Rev. Andrew Walter, Washington; Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry, Ex Officio; President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, Ex Officio; and staff members N. Kurt Barnes, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer; Margareth Crosnier de Bellaistre, Director, Investment Management and Banking; Nancy Caparulo, Committee Support; and Jose Gonzalez, Accountant.

 

For more info

For information contact Crosnier de Bellaistre.

 

 

N. Kurt Barnes, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer, announced that the Episcopal Church Economic Justice Loan Committee (ELJC) recently approved five investments in community development financial intermediaries, totaling $1.4 million. "We are...
Tagged in: staff

Jeremy Tackett has been named the Episcopal Church Digital Evangelist, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff.

In this new full-time position, Tackett’s duties will include strategizing efforts for the building of relationships, creating community, and fostering an aspirational online social presence by managing and implementing the Episcopal Church's growing digital evangelism ministry.

Most recently, Tackett was Director of Communications at Christ Episcopal Church in Raleigh, NC. Prior to that he was Coordinator of Publications at University of Pikeville, KY

Tackett boasts extensive background in digital and social media platforms, web data analytics (Google Analytics, Strategic Email Marketing, Social Media Engagement) and web engagement. He holds Inbound and Email Marketing certifications from Hubspot and is a member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

Tackett holds a BS in Communication from University of Kentucky.

Additionally, he has more than 10 years of experience in ministry and church leadership, in a variety of church settings and roles as both a professional and volunteer.

A member of the Office of Communications, Tackett will be based in Raleigh, NC and will report to the Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Ministry Within the Episcopal Church

Tackett will begin his new position on February 1.  At that time he will be available at jtackett@episcopalchurch.org

Jeremy Tackett has been named the Episcopal Church Digital Evangelist, a member of the Presiding Bishop’s staff. In this new full-time position, Tackett’s duties will include strategizing efforts for the building of relationships, creating...
Tagged in: Evangelism Revivals

The Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Pittsburgh are sponsoring a Revival on February 3 – 5 in Pittsburgh, PA. The Presiding Bishop's Pilgrimage for Reconciliation, Healing and Evangelism in Southwestern Pennsylvania will feature an ecumenical service of repentance involving local religious and civic leaders, a worship service celebrating Absalom Jones, and other gatherings that invite people across boundaries and into reconciling relationship with each other and with God.

Media credentials are required; contact Rich Creehan, Director of Communications for the Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh, at media@episcopalpgh.org or Neva Rae Fox, Episcopal Church Public Affairs Officer, at publicaffairs@episcopalchurch.org

A complete list of events is available at www.episcopalpgh.org/pbvisit

Many of the Pittsburgh events will be live-streamed or available on demand here.

Revivals are multi-day events filled with such elements as energizing worship and prayer services, dynamic preaching, personal testimony and storytelling, topical speakers, offerings from local artists and musicians, engagement with young leaders, intentional outreach with people who are not active in a faith community, and a call to action. Each Revival warmly welcomes neighboring dioceses and ecumenical participation.

The Revivals rise from partnerships of diocesan leadership and the Presiding Bishop’s Office for Evangelism Initiatives and the Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, the Presiding Bishop’s Canon for Evangelism, Reconciliation and Creation.

 

The Pittsburgh event marks the first of six Revivals slated in 2017- 2018:

May 5 – 7: Diocese of West Missouri

September 17: Diocese of Georgia

November 17-19: Diocese of San Joaquin

April 6 – 8, 2018: Diocese of Honduras

July 2018: Joint Evangelism Mission with the Church of England

 

The Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Pittsburgh are sponsoring a Revival on February 3 – 5 in Pittsburgh, PA. The Presiding Bishop's Pilgrimage for Reconciliation, Healing and Evangelism in Southwestern Pennsylvania will feature an ecumenical...

The following is a statement from Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry.

This past week, Barack H. Obama, the 44th President of the United States, in the tradition of Presidents dating back to George Washington, gave his farewell address to the nation. Next week Donald J. Trump, in the same tradition of this country, will take the oath of office and be inaugurated as the 45th President.  

We recognize that this election has been contentious, and the Episcopal Church, like our nation, has expressed a diversity of views, some of which have been born in deep pain.

There has been much discussion, and some controversy, about the appropriateness of the Washington National Cathedral hosting the Inaugural Prayer Service this year, and of church choirs singing at inaugural events.

Underneath the variety of questions and concerns are some basic Christian questions about prayer: when I pray for our leaders, why am I doing so?  Should I pray for a leader I disagree with? When I pray what do I think I am accomplishing? 

On one level these questions seem inconsequential and innocuous. But real prayer is not innocuous. It is powerful. That question can become poignant and even painful as it is for many in this moment, given that some of the values that many of us heard expressed over the past year have seemed to be in contradiction to deeply-held Christian convictions of love, compassion, and human dignity.

So, should we pray for the President?

We can and, indeed, I believe we must pray for all who lead in our civic order, nationally and internationally. I pray for the President in part because Jesus Christ is my Savior and Lord.  If Jesus is my Lord and the model and guide for my life, his way must be my way, however difficult. And the way prayer for others is a part of how I follow the way of Jesus.

This practice of praying for leaders is deep in our biblical and Anglican/Episcopalian traditions. Psalm 72 prays that the ancient Israelite king might rule in the ways of God’s justice, defending “the cause of the poor,” bringing “deliverance to the needy.” 1 Timothy 2:1-2 encourages followers of Jesus to pray earnestly for those in leadership, that they may lead in ways that serve the common good.  Even in the most extreme case, Jesus himself said, while dying on the cross, “Father forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing,” was praying for Pontius Pilate, the Governor of Rome who ordered his execution, and for all who were complicit in it.

In this spirit, the Prayer Books of the Anglican/Episcopal way have always included prayer for those “who bear the authority of government,” praying in a variety of ways that they may lead in the ways of God’s wisdom, justice and truth. When we pray for Donald, Barack, George, Bill, George, or Jimmy, Presidents of the United States, we pray for their well-being, for they too are children of God, but we also pray for their leadership in our society and world. We pray that they will lead in the ways of justice and truth. We pray that their leadership will truly serve not partisan interest but the common good. When we pray for them, we are actually praying for our nation, for our world, indeed we are praying for ourselves. 

Prayer is not a simplistic cheer or declaration of support. Prayers of lament cry out in pain and cry for justice. Prayer can celebrate. Prayer can also ask God to intervene and change the course of history, to change someone's mind, or his or her heart.  When we pray for our enemies, we may find that we are simultaneously emboldened to stand for justice while we are also less able to demonize another human being.

Real prayer is both contemplative and active. It involves a contemplative conversation with and listening to God, and an active following of the way of Jesus, serving and witnessing in the world in his Name. For those who follow the way of Jesus, the active side of our life of prayer seeks to live out and help our society live out what it means to “love your neighbor as yourself.” So we work for a good and just, humane and loving society. We participate as followers of Jesus in the life of our government and society, caring for each other and others, and working for policies and laws that reflect the values and teachings of Jesus to “love your neighbor,” to “do unto others as you who have them do unto you,” to fashion a civic order that reflects the goodness, the justice, the compassion that we see in the face of Jesus, that we know to reflect the very heart and dream of God for all of God’s children and God’s creation.

I grew up in a historically black congregation in the Episcopal Church. We prayed for leaders who were often lukewarm or even opposed to our very civil rights. We got on our knees in church and prayed for them, and then we got up off our knees and we Marched on Washington. Following the way of Jesus, we prayed and protested at the same time. We prayed for our leaders who were fighting for our civil rights, we prayed for those with whom we disagreed, and we even prayed for those who hated us. And we did so following the Jesus, whose way is the way of unselfish, sacrificial love. And that way is the way that can set us all free.

As we celebrate the birth of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., we may find guidance in his words, spoken during one of the most painful and difficult struggles in the Civil Rights Movement. He asked that all participants live by a set of principles. The first principle read: “As you prepare to march, meditate on the life and teachings of Jesus.”

Should we pray for the President?

Yes!

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

 

The following is a statement from Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry. This past week, Barack H. Obama, the 44th President of the United States, in the tradition of Presidents dating back to George Washington, gave his farewell address to...

Episcopal Migration Ministries and the Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations are sponsoring an important webinar to discuss the basic root causes of refugee crises and to examine critical questions such as: who is a refugee; how a refugee is resettled to the U.S.; how resettled refugees benefit their communities; and how you can engage with local communities to welcome these new Americans.

The Episcopal Church Welcomes Refugees, a free, one-hour educational webinar, will be held on Wednesday, February 1 at 4 pm Eastern (3 pm Central/2 pm Mountain/1 pm Pacific/noon Alaska/11 am Hawaii).

“Every day, hundreds of community groups, churches, families and individuals work tirelessly to provide a place of safety for those who have had to flee their homes because of war, persecution, or other violence,” noted the Rev. Canon E. Mark Stevenson, Director of Episcopal Migration Ministries. “The Episcopal Church’s ministry of refugee resettlement is rooted in our nation’s longstanding history of serving as a safe haven for those seeking freedom from oppression. With more than 23.1 million refugees around the world, it is now more important than ever for people of faith to continue this tradition.”

Leading the webinar will be Lacy Broemel, Episcopal Church Refugee and Immigration Policy Analyst, and Allison Duvall, Episcopal Migration Ministries Manager for Church Relations and Engagement.

Registration is required and is available here.  

The webinar will be available on-demand following the event.

For more information, contact Broemel

 

Episcopal Migration Ministries

Episcopal Migration Ministries is the church’s foremost response to refugee crises. Working in partnership with offices and groups within the church as well as with governments, non-government organizations (NGOs), and a network of 30 affiliate offices in 26 dioceses, Episcopal Migration Ministries assures safe passage and provides vital services for thousands of refugee families upon their arrival in America: English language and cultural orientation classes, employment services, school enrollment, and initial assistance with housing and transportation. For each family, the goal is self-reliance and self-determination. After years of living in limbo, thanks to Episcopal Migration Ministries, refugees now have the opportunity to begin again on a strong foundation that honors their stories and dignity.

 

www.episcopalchurch.org/emm

 

Office of Government Relations

The Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations (OGR) represents the priorities of the Episcopal Church to the policy community in Washington, D.C. Through engaging Congress, the Administration, and U.S. government departments and agencies, the Office of Government Relations aims to shape and influence policy on critical issues, highlighting the voices and experiences of Episcopalians and Anglicans globally. Advocacy priorities of the Office of Government Relations include refugees and immigration, environmental stewardship, and international development and conflict. Through the Episcopal Public Policy Network, the Office of Government Relations strives to equip Episcopalians to become advocates themselves on these critical issues.

 

http://advocacy.episcopalchurch.org/

 

Episcopal Migration Ministries and the Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations are sponsoring an important webinar to discuss the basic root causes of refugee crises and to examine critical questions such as: who is a refugee; how a refugee...

On Thursday, January 12, Thursdays at 2 will feature Ecclesia Ministries Common Cathedral in Boston (Diocese of Massachusetts).

The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned.

Common cathedral (Ecclesia Ministries, Inc.) is an outdoor congregation, housed and un-housed, sharing God’s love through community, pastoral care, creative expression, and worship on Boston Common. Common Cathedral serves as an important community for people experiencing homelessness, and for faith communities who want to be in supportive relationship with un-housed individuals and their friends.

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Christ Church in Philadelphia, PA
  • YASCer in Tanzania
  • Two Tables
  • The Food Pantry at St. Gregory Nyssa in San Francisco, CA
  • @OurTable
  • Young Adult Service Corps
  • The Crossing
  • United Thank Offering at St. Paul's Senior Center
  • Amazing Grace
  • St. Thomas Choir School
  • Bridal designer Anne Barge
  • Musician Mike Notter
  • Reflections by Brother Geoffrey
  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • Potluck Dinners
  • Jericho Road
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table
  • Church on the Square in Baltimore
  • Episcopal Church Advocacy
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes, a food truck ministry in the Diocese of Rhode Island
  • The Slate Project, an Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian congregation that exists online and in person.
  • Music and surfing leading back to church. 

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

 

Transforming Churches - Ecclesia Ministries Common Cathedral Boston

On Thursday, January 12, Thursdays at 2 will feature Ecclesia Ministries Common Cathedral in Boston (Diocese of Massachusetts). The video is available here and is also available closed-captioned. Common cathedral (Ecclesia Ministries, Inc.) is an...
Tagged in: staff

Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has announced the retirement of John E. Colón as Director of Human Resources at the Episcopal Church, a position he has held since 1989.

“John has served the church as a member of the staff of four Presiding Bishops,” Presiding Bishop Curry said.  “What a tenure of service and witness! We will miss his kind, faithful and delightful presence, but we thank God that we have served with him.  As was said when John Glenn was about to orbit the earth, we say now, ‘Godspeed’ John Colón.”

“It has been a privilege and an honor to have served at the churchwide offices for more than 28 years under four Presiding Bishops and with current and former colleagues,” Colón said. “Be assured that as The Jesus Movement continues to revive us in this Church, I will be there walking alongside you in prayer, action and thanksgiving.”

Colón joined the staff of the Episcopal Church in September 1988 and was named Director of Human Resources in June 1989.  Prior to the Episcopal Church, Colón was the Corporate Secretary and Director of Personnel and Director of the Christian Herald Youth Program for Christian Herald Children’s Home, and Bowery Mission and Young Men’s Home, New York, NY. He has taught courses as a Lead Adjunct Instructor at Cornell University – NYS School of Industrial and Labor Relations and as an Adjunct Faculty Member at New York University School of Continuing and Professional Studies.  He has been dedicated to Camp Viva (Family Services of Westchester), Yonkers, NY since 2001, currently serving as a Program Coordinator.

A graduate of Colgate University with a Bachelor of Arts and the State University of New York, Binghamton, NY with a Master of Arts, Colón holds numerous certifications and professional licenses.

Colón will retire on February 28. In his retirement Colón plans to continue providing consultant services focused on diversity, inclusion and managing difference in varied organizational systems.

Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry has announced the retirement of John E. Colón as Director of Human Resources at the Episcopal Church, a position he has held since 1989. “John has served the church as a member of the staff of four...