Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Relations

The ecumenical movement is The Episcopal Church's response to Jesus' prayer for his disciples in John 17:21 "that they may all be one." The Office for Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Relations offers prayers for unity and participates in formal dialogues to nurture a spirit of understanding and respect, while collaborating actively in mission and ministry opportunities. 

In response to numerous requests, the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, assisted by Dr. Lucinda Mosher's NeighborFaith Consultancy, is pleased to offer an annotated list of items (including some with links and downloads) answering FAQs on interfaith concerns. This list will grow. Please revisit it often!

Muhammad: Legacy of a Prophet. Unity Productions Foundation
A documentary produced in 2002 by Alex Kronemer and Michael Wolfe that depicts stepping-stones in the biography of the Prophet of Islam and the relevance of each in the lives of early 21st-century American Muslims. Although now fifteen years old, it is still a valuable tool for instruction and dialogue.

Omid Safi, Memories of Muhammad (HarperOne, 2009). 
Blending personal reflection with solid scholarship, this beautifully written book helps non-Muslim readers understand the Prophet of Islam as a complex historical figure and the connection Muslims have to him.  

Ingrid Mattson, The Story of the Qur’an: Its History and Place in Muslim Life, second edition. Wiley-Blackwell, 2013.
A well-known expert with a gift for storytelling offers comprehensive insight into what the Qur’an is, how it came to be, how Muslims learn it, and what it means in their lives.  

Amir Hussain, Oil and Water: Two Faiths, One God (CopperHouse, 2006).
An introduction to Islam written for Christian readers by a devout Muslim scholar with deep appreciation of Christianity. 

The Hadith of Gabriel
A traditional primer on the basics of Islam.

 

In response to numerous requests, the Office of Ecumenical and Interreligious Relations, assisted by Dr. Lucinda Mosher's NeighborFaith Consultancy, is pleased to offer an annotated list of items (including some with links and downloads) answering
The Episcopal Church is an active participant—as a full member or supporter—in a number of ecumenical and interreligious networks and regular events. This page provides links to these groupings in alphabetical order.
Anglican Communion Network for Interfaith Concerns
http://nifcon.anglicancommunion.org/
Bread for the World
http://www.bread.org/
Christian Churches Together
http://christianchurchestogether.org/
Church World Service
http://cwsglobal.org/
Churches for Middle East Peace
http://www.cmep.org
Churches Uniting in Christ
http://churchesunitinginchrist.org
The Consultation on Common Texts
http://www.commontexts.org
The National Council of Churches
http://nationalcouncilofchurches.us/
National Religious Partnership for the Environment
http://www.nrpe.org
National Workshop on Christian Unity
http://nwcu.org/
Parliament of the World's Religions
https://parliamentofreligions.org/
Religions for Peace USA
http://www.rfpusa.org/
The World Council of Churches
https://www.oikoumene.org/
The Episcopal Church is an active participant—as a full member or supporter—in a number of ecumenical and interreligious networks and regular events. This page provides links to these groupings in alphabetical order. Anglican Communion Network for

May 25-June 4, 2017

Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement which the Archbishop of Canterbury is inviting people around the world to join. The wave of prayer will start in May and run for 10 days between the Christian festivals of Ascension and Pentecost.

May 25-June 4, 2017 Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement which the Archbishop of Canterbury is inviting people around the world to join. The wave of prayer will start in May and run for 10 days between the Christian festivals of Ascension

Episcopal News Service Editor’s Note: On Jan. 6, 2001, after 30 years of dialogue, the Episcopal Church and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, while maintaining their autonomy, agreed to come together to work for joint mission in the world and to allow clergy to move freely between the two churches.

Episcopal News Service Editor’s Note: On Jan. 6, 2001, after 30 years of dialogue, the Episcopal Church and Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, while maintaining their autonomy, agreed to come together to work for joint mission in the world and

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