DIOCESE OF ALABAMA

Jubilee Ministries Alabama Mudiam

 

1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity?

We are new to Jubilee Ministries in 2017, but have been serving our community for nearly 30 years. St. Michael's Clinic is the only provider for the uninsured in West Anniston, the largest population of the uninsured in Calhoun County.

 

2) What is/are your role(s) in your diocese? In your parish? In a ministry or ministries?

The role of St. Michael's Community Services, Inc. is to minister the love of Jesus through the provision of healthcare to those who otherwise have little or no access to services. The ministry is an outreach of The Church of St. Michael and All Angels. The focus of the work is to offer medical services to those without access, connect patients to needed resources, provide social services such as patient education, and to provide an organization to which concerned citizens can confidently invest in meeting the needs of those living with health disparities. Thousands of patients have been served in West Anniston and the surrounding communities of Calhoun County.

To see more of the Diocese of Alabama's important work, check out their page on the Episcopal Asset Map. While you're there, search for innovative ministries, connect with leaders across the Church and tell us about the ways the Spirit is at work in your neighborhood through a short survey.

3) What’s one way you’ve been changed by your work alongside the economically disadvantaged?

Working alongside those struggling with poverty and health disparities has opened my eyes to the value of community resources. Working together with others in our community, we can alleviate the burden of poverty. I think poverty is an issue that can seem so overwhelming that we feel powerless to face it. But if those who seek to love and serve Jesus would turn their hearts toward the poor, collectively we can truly help our neighbors. Disparity in privilege should not dictate the allocation of resources.

Episcopal Jubilee Mudiam Poverty Ministries

 

4) What does advocacy mean to you?

Advocacy is a fighting word to me. I do not mean to stir thoughts of violence, but rather of strongly held convictions that I feel compelled to address. One of the primary roles of St. Michael's Community Services, Inc. is to advocate for the needs of our patients. They need someone who understands the healthcare system and can navigate it in such a way as to meet their basic healthcare needs. Advocacy in our ministry often meets a persistent pursuit of locating resources to meet the needs of our patients.

Episcopal Jubilee St Michaels

 

5) Where in your diocese (or parish, or ministry) have you seen Jesus?

We see Jesus in the faces of every patient. In the notable passage of Jesus in Matthew 25, when we serve the least of these, we have served Jesus. These faces are housecleaners, waitresses, those struggling with addiction, the undocumented worker, the ex-convict, the homeless, the mental health patient, and others who have been marginalized, who have fallen through the healthcare gaps in our community.

Episcopal Where I See Jesus

What a privilege it is to serve them. I am so grateful for the opportunity. Jesus can also be seen in the application of His commandments to us. In the performing of the acts that Christ has called us to perform, Christ then is portrayed to those we encounter. It is Outreach/Evangelism in its truest sense. Jesus is seen in our work.

 

Nanette Mudiam is the director of St. Michael's Medical Clinic in Anniston, Diocese of Alabama.

If you are interested in having your church or ministry designated a Jubilee Ministry, please contact Mr. Christopher Sikkema at 212-716-6055 or csikkema@episcopalchurch.org. The application to be designated a Jubilee Ministry can be found HERE.

  1) How long have you been affiliated with Jubilee Ministries, and in what capacity? We are new to Jubilee Ministries in 2017, but have been serving our community for nearly 30 years. St. Michael's Clinic is the only provider for the uninsured in

Imagine for just a minute that you are in the 3rd grade again.

When school is out, you ride the bus home to an empty house. Mom is at work and will not arrive home until 5:30 or 6:00 p.m. You have a little sister who is five years old that you have to look out for until Mom gets home. The sun is shining and you'd much rather be outside kicking a soccer ball around with your friends. Besides watching your sister, you're supposed to be doing your homework because Mom wants it done by the time she gets home. She's always too tired to help and has a hard time reading anyway.

You get out your math book and turn to the chapter you began this week. Your class is working on telling time. You look at the first exercise: "It's 2:45. How much time has passed since 2:15?" You try to remember what Miss Kingsley said about minutes and hours. Your little sister is asking for a snack. She's hungry and there's nothing to feed her. You're hungry too but you know there won't be any money for groceries until Friday, four whole days away. Supper, when Mom finally gets home, will be a can of beans and maybe a hot dog with no bun. It's hard to think about minutes and hours when your stomach is growling and your sister is crying. Why does life have to be so hard?

St. John's Episcopal Church in Decatur, Alabama, has seen the needs of their neighbor, Banks-Caddell Elementary School. From a 96% student poverty rate to low performance on reading tests to a historically underserved student population, Banks-Caddell was ready for investment by their community.

Already connected to the school by the efforts of a parish volunteer, the school sought out a relationship with the principal, who had recently implemented a tutoring program among English as a Second Language (ESL) students. Her dream was to extend that program to other students who lacked support at home. The parishioners and St. John's were delighted to have the opportunity to serve more than 20 students who might otherwise fall through the cracks.

The Banks-Caddell Partnership would have two main components: Homework Helpers, providing snacks, volunteer tutors, and transportation to 25 students after school, and the Backpack Program, filling and distributing backpacks with non-perishable food on Fridays, to students who received free lunches during the week.

Banks-Caddell Elementary's principal has found the program to be an outstanding success, allowing students to focus on schoolwork in a safe, secure and risk-free environment, providing an additional academic and emotional support system for students, and preparing these young people for class, thus impacting not only their academics, but also their self-confidence.

The results of the Partnership have been gratifying; within its first year, 77% of students raised their reading test scores, and 82% raised their math test scores. Significantly, 4 students increased their reading level by a grade or more and 9 students increased their math level by a grade or more-- over 8 weeks! When asked about their excitement for the program, students said, "I liked finishing my homework and I liked the people." Another commented, "My favorite part was working on my multiplication and division."

St. John's Episcopal Church, Decatur, has done wonderful work launching the Banks-Caddell Neighborhood Partnership, serving God and each other through the selfless giving of time and resources. Perhaps the greatest accolade they could receive is a young student remarking, "I felt special because I was learning."

Banks-Caddell Neighborhood Partnership's work received the recognition of Jubilee Ministries in 2014 when they won a $1,500 Program Impact Grant.

Imagine for just a minute that you are in the 3rd grade again. When school is out, you ride the bus home to an empty house. Mom is at work and will not arrive home until 5:30 or 6:00 p.m. You have a little sister who is five years old that you have