MICHAEL CURRY

Today, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, has placed a "Partial Restriction on the Ministry of a Bishop" on the Rt. Rev. Jon Bruno of the Diocese of Los Angeles.

Signed by the Presiding Bishop, the Partial Restriction is effective immediately and is a temporary measure only, to protect the integrity of the Church's disciplinary process, until it is concluded. This partial and temporary restriction does not “express any opinion about the merits of the pending Title IV proceeding.”

The text of the Partial Restriction follows:

 

Partial Restriction on the Ministry of a Bishop

 

In recent days, I have learned of actions that, in my view, may threaten the good order and welfare of the Church.  I have learned that, earlier this year, the Rt. Rev. Jon Bruno, Bishop of the Diocese of Los Angeles, entered into a contract for sale of property (the “St. James property”) that is central to a disciplinary matter now pending under Title IV of the Canons of The Episcopal Church, in which Bishop Bruno is the Respondent. According to Bishop Bruno’s submissions in that disciplinary matter, the contract for sale of the St. James property sets the closing date as July 3, 2017. 

Bishop Bruno’s actions and intentions regarding an earlier attempted sale of the St. James property are currently under review in the pending disciplinary matter. I am deeply concerned that his act of entering into a new contract for sale of the same property, while his approach to the earlier sale is still under review, has the potential to undermine the integrity of the Church’s disciplinary process. The secrecy with which the recent sales contract was undertaken adds to the potential for undermining the integrity of the Church’s disciplinary process.

Accordingly, in order to protect the integrity of the Church’s disciplinary process and, thereby, the good order and welfare of the Church, and pursuant to Canons IV.7(3), (4), and IV.17(2), I hereby place the following partial restriction on the exercise of his ministry until the pending Title IV matter has been finally resolved: 

 

During the period of the restriction, the Bishop, acting individually, or as Bishop Diocesan, or as Corporate Sole, or in any other capacity, is forbidden from closing on the sale of the St. James property, or otherwise selling or conveying the property or contracting to sell the property, or, in any way assisting in the sale or conveyance of the property.

 

This restriction is effective immediately. Nothing in this restriction is intended to express any opinion about the merits of the pending Title IV proceeding.

This document shall be served upon Bishop Bruno today and shall inform him of his right to have any objections to this restriction heard pursuant to Canon IV.7. 

 

(The Most Rev.) Michael Bruce Curry

XXVII Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church

 

Today, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, has placed a "Partial Restriction on the Ministry of a Bishop" on the Rt. Rev. Jon Bruno of the Diocese of Los Angeles. Signed by the Presiding Bishop, the

On Thursday, June 15, Thursdays at 2 features Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry in his 2017 World Refugee Day Message.

The video is available here.

“In the name of Mary, Joseph and the Lord Jesus, aid all refugees today, for most of the refugees like the Holy Family themselves, are families, and most are children,” the Presiding Bishop says. “I invite you to observe June 20 as World Refugee Day to learn more about the crisis and to find ways that you can both pray and help in other ways.”

In 2000, the United Nations named June 20 as World Refugee Day, deeming it an annual opportunity to celebrate the resilience and success of the former refugees who bless our communities with their wisdom and irrepressible spirit and to examine the root causes of violence and persecution that force people to flee at an alarming rate.

Episcopal Migration Ministries is a ministry of the Episcopal Church, and is one of nine national agencies that work in partnership with the government to resettle refugees in the United States. Episcopal Migration Ministries currently has 31 affiliate offices in 23 states.

Thursdays at 2 is a weekly preview of Episcopal Church innovative ministries. Every Thursday at 2 pm Eastern, a new video illustrating the work of congregations and individuals will be posted on the Episcopal Church's Facebook page here and YouTube Channel here

Produced by the Episcopal Church Office of Communications, previously posted videos featured on Thursdays at 2 include:

  • Jericho Road Episcopal Housing Initiative of New Orleans
  • Thy Kingdom Come
  • For Such a Time as This: A Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy
  • Our Lady of Guadalupe, Seattle WA
  • Mobile Loaves and Fishes
  • Bistro St. Michael’s
  • Episcopal Migration Ministries
  • Edible Churchyard
  • Episcopal Revival
  • St. Gabriel's, Leesburg VA
  • Ecclesia Ministries Common Cathedral
  • Christ Church in Philadelphia, PA
  • YASCer in Tanzania
  • Two Tables
  • The Food Pantry at St. Gregory Nyssa in San Francisco, CA
  • @OurTable
  • Young Adult Service Corps
  • United Thank Offering at St. Paul's Senior Center
  • Amazing Grace
  • St. Thomas Choir School
  • Bridal designer Anne Barge
  • Ferguson Pilgrimage
  • Bluestone Farms and the Community of the Holy Spirit
  • The Abundant Table

For more information contact Mike Collins, Episcopal Church Manager of Multimedia.

 

PB World Refugee Day2017

On Thursday, June 15, Thursdays at 2 features Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry in his 2017 World Refugee Day Message. The video is available here. “In the name of Mary, Joseph and the Lord Jesus, aid all refugees today

“In the name of Mary, Joseph and the Lord Jesus, aid all refugees today, for most of the refugees like the Holy Family themselves, are families, and most are children,” commented Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry in his 2017 World Refugee Day Message. “I invite you to observe June 20 as World Refugee Day to learn more about the crisis and to find ways that you can both pray and help in other ways.”

In 2000, the United Nations named June 20 as World Refugee Day, deeming it an annual opportunity to celebrate the resilience and success of the former refugees who bless our communities with their wisdom and irrepressible spirit and to examine the root causes of violence and persecution that force people to flee at an alarming rate.

Episcopal Migration Ministries is a ministry of the Episcopal Church, and is one of nine national agencies that work in partnership with the government to resettle refugees in the United States. Episcopal Migration Ministries currently has 31 affiliate offices in 23 states.

The Presiding Bishop’s video message is here.  The transcription is located at the end of this information.

Episcopal Migration Ministries toolkit

Episcopal Migration Ministries has prepared a comprehensive toolkit, located here, with ideas and guides for individuals and congregations to observe World Refugee Day on June 20. 

In 2017, World Refugee Day falls within the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, and one of the toolkit items provides ways to host an Interfaith Panel Discussion & Prayer for refugees followed by an Iftar meal (literally translated to breakfast).

“Faith is one of the primary drivers for many involved in the important work of refugee resettlement,” commented the Rev. Canon E. Mark Stevenson, director of Episcopal Migration Ministries. “We hope, by gathering members of and in communities across this land to eat together and share aspects of their own particular faith traditions regarding welcoming, that we can deepen our relationships and inspire even greater ministry on the local level.”

Resources

  • Host a #StandTogether Interfaith Conversation, Prayer and Dinner in honor of World Refugee Day, resources available here
  • Start a conversation in your congregation and community about how you can be involved in this life-saving work. World Refugee Day bulletin insert here.
  • Join the Episcopal Public Policy Network to learn more about how you can work with local and elected leaders to support refugees.

 

Transcription

 

Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry

2017 World Refugee Day Message

 

In the late 1930s, as the world was on the verge of being plunged into an apocalyptic Second World War, Episcopalians and the Episcopal Church gathered together and began work to resettle those who were refugees fleeing terror in Europe, helping to resettle families, helping to resettle young people, helping to resettle people in this country in safety and security. 

Since the 1930s, Episcopalians have been involved in the work of resettling families and people who are refugees, some 80,000. 

At that time, in the 1930s there was a poster that depicted Mary, the baby Jesus, and Joseph. Mary was on the donkey. They were clearly on a journey. They were fleeing Palestine. They were seeking to find safety in Egypt. They were refugees. The poster from the 1930s read, “In the name of these refugees, aid all refugees.”

In the name of Mary, Joseph and the Lord Jesus, aid all refugees today, for most of the refugees like the Holy Family themselves, are families, and most are children.

I invite you to observe June 20 as World Refugee Day to learn more about the crisis and to find ways that you can both pray and help in other ways.

God bless you, God keep you, and you keep the faith.

 

“In the name of Mary, Joseph and the Lord Jesus, aid all refugees today, for most of the refugees like the Holy Family themselves, are families, and most are children,” commented Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry in his

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry has issued the following statement on President Donald Trump’s action and the Paris Climate Accord.

With the announcement by President Donald Trump of his decision to withdraw the commitment made by the United States to the Paris Climate Accord, I am reminded of the words of the old spiritual which speaks of God and God's creation in these words, "He's got the whole world in his hands." The whole world belongs to God, as Psalm 24 teaches us. God's eye is ever on even the tiny sparrow, as Jesus taught and the song says (Luke 12:6). And we human beings have been charged with being trustees, caretakers, stewards of God's creation (Genesis 1:26-31).

The United States has been a global leader in caring for God's creation through efforts over the years on climate change. President Trump’s announcement changes the U.S.’s leadership role in the international sphere. Despite this announcement, many U.S. businesses, states, cities, regions, nongovernmental organizations and faith bodies like the Episcopal Church can continue to take bold action to address the climate crisis.  The phrase, “We’re still in,” became a statement of commitment for many of us who regardless of this decision by our President are still committed to the principles of the Paris Agreement.

Faith bodies like the Episcopal Church occupy a unique space in the worldwide climate movement. In the context of the United Nations, the UNFCCC and the Paris Agreement, we are an international body representing 17 countries in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, and Asia and the Pacific. We also are an admitted observer organization to the UNFCCC process, empowered to bring accredited observers to the UN climate change meetings. Furthermore, the Episcopal Church is a member of the worldwide Anglican Communion, the third-largest Christian tradition, and we remain committed to ensuring that Anglicans everywhere are empowered to undertake bold action on climate change mitigation and adaptation.

We know that caring for God's creation by engaging climate change is not only good for the environment, but also good for the health and welfare of our people. The U.S. is currently creating more clean jobs faster than job creation in nearly every other sector of the economy, and unprecedented acceleration in the clean energy sector is also evident in many other major economies.

My prayer is that we in the Episcopal Church will, in this and all things, follow the way, the teachings and the Spirit of Jesus by cultivating a loving, liberating and life-giving relationship with God, all others in the human family, and with all of God's good creation.

In spite of hardships and setbacks, the work goes on. This is God's world.  And we are all his children. And, "He's got the whole world in his hands."

 

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry has issued the following statement on President Donald Trump’s action and the Paris Climate Accord. With the announcement by President Donald Trump of his decision to withdraw the

On May 25, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry leads the Thy Kingdom Come videos for the Worldwide Anglican Communion. Thy Kingdom Come is a campaign initiated by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby calling for prayer by individuals, congregations and families.

Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement that invites Christians around the world to pray between Ascension Day – May 25 - and Pentecost – June 4 - for more people to come to know Jesus.  #ThyKingdomCome

Presiding Bishop Curry’s video is here

A new inspirational video message featuring a different religious leader each day will be presented throughout Thy Kingdom Come.

 

May 25 #ToJesus The Most Rev. Michael Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Episcopal Church

May 26 #Praise His Eminence Christoph Cardinal Schonborn, Archbishop of Vienna

May 27 #Thanks The Most Rev Paul Kwong, Archbishop of Hong Kong

May 28 #Sorry The Venerable Liz Adekunle, Archdeacon of Hackney, London

May 29 #Offer The Rt. Rev. Griselda Delgado del Carpio, Bishop of Cuba

May 30 #PrayFor The Most. Rev. Fred Hiltz, Archbishop and Primate, the Anglican Church of Canada

May 31 #Help The Most Rev John Sentamu, Archbishop of York and Primate of England

June 1 #Adore The Rev. Roger Walton, President, British Methodist Conference

June 2 #Celebrate His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop, the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom

June 3 #Silence Br. Keith Nelson, SSJE, the Society of St. John the Evangelist

June 4 #ThyKingdomCome The Most Rev. and Rt. Hon. Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury and Primate of All England

 

All videos will be available here 

 

Pledge2Pray

Sign-up to participate in Pledge2Pray here or here.

Prayer resources for individuals, congregations and/or families can be downloaded at no fee here.

 

#Pledge2Pray

 

Resources and information

A wide selection of resources and information are available to participate in many ways in Thy Kingdom Come:

  • Episcopal Church and Thy Kingdom Come here
  • Thy Kingdom Come here
  • Prayer resources that can be downloaded at no fee are here
  • #Pledge2Pray
  • #ThyKingdomCome
  • Join the Facebook page here
  • A Prayer Journal to record thoughts, prayers and ideas throughout Thy Kingdom Come; for young people and adults. Download at no fee here
  • Episcopal Church’s sense of prayer aids ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ campaign by Episcopal News Service here
On May 25, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry leads the Thy Kingdom Come videos for the Worldwide Anglican Communion. Thy Kingdom Come is a campaign initiated by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby calling for prayer

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry presented the following sermon at a special liturgy at the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Port-A-Prince Haiti.

 

Sermon on the Occasion of the Liturgical Signing of Covenant of Reconciliation

 

The Episcopal Diocese of Haiti

Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry

Tuesday, May 23

 

"Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”"

Matthew 28:16-20

 

My brothers and sisters, I greet you, in the Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. I likewise bring you the greetings of your brothers and sisters in Christ who are, with you, the Episcopal Church, or, better yet, the Episcopal branch of the Jesus Movement.

I give our God thanks for you, for the faithful ministries of clergy and lay people here. For you the clergy of this diocese, for the people of the churches, parishes and missions, for all of the schools which educate new generations of children, for clinics and hospitals which care for the sick, for ministries like St. Vincent's School for the Handicapped, the Center for Agriculture of St. Barnabas, the Music School of Holy Trinity, for the ministries you and many share with groups like Episcopal Relief and Development, Fresh Ministries, Food for the Poor, Heifer International, Episcopal University of Haiti, and many, many more.

But I want to add a special word of thanks and thanksgiving to Almighty God. In the Sermon on the Mount, found in Matthew chapters 5-7, the Lord Jesus taught us that the way of love is often realized in our willingness to go the second mile, sometimes when it hurts. The way of love, Jesus taught us, is the way of the cross, willingness to sacrifice self-interest, and even self, for the good of others.  That is the way of Jesus. And he is our Lord! And we are his followers, his disciples.

And you,

the Reverend Clergy of this blessed Diocese,

you, the Standing Committee,

you, Chancellors and other clergy and lay leaders of the Church here,

and especially you, my beloved brother bishops,

Bishop Zache Duracin, Bishop Oge Beauvoir,

you in this Covenant have been willing to go the extra mile, as Jesus taught us.

For the good of the people, for the good of the nation and for the good of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti.

You have sacrificed self-interest for the good of all.

You have been willing to begin the hard and difficult work of healing.

You have been willing through this Covenant to open the way that leads to reconciliation.

 

I thank you. And to God be the glory!

It was on the cross, as he was dying, that our Lord Jesus forgave even those who had tortured and crucified him. "Father, forgive them. They know not what they do." Our beloved brother, Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa, has shown us that Jesus teaches us from the cross that forgiveness is the way to a new future. He says that without forgiveness there is no future.

Mutual forgiveness and repentance, healing and reconciliation are hard work and they often take time. Healing and reconciliation do not happen quickly. But it happens, if we are willing, to allow God’s grace to work in us, for God's grace is sufficient. God is able.

And through this Covenant we -- Bishop Duracin, Bishop Beauvoir, the Standing Committee, the Reverend Clergy, and I, as your Presiding Bishop -- all of us together, we take this step in which we each repent for any way we have hurt each other,  we take a step toward mutual forgiveness, a step toward God's healing, a step toward reconciliation through the blood of Jesus Christ on the cross. This I commit to do, and I pray and believe you join me in that.

Now we are not perfect. We will make mistakes along the way. But if we press on, following this way of Jesus, walking together, upholding each other, we will make it because God’s power, working in us can do more than we can ask or imagine.  And this world needs our witness.  People need to know the power of God to heal, to forgive, to reconcile and rebuild. People need to know the power of our faith as we press on toward the Kingdom of God.

As St. Paul said in Philippians.

Beloved, I do not consider that I have made it my own; but this one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the heavenly call of God in Christ Jesus. (Philippians 3:13-14)

 

So why does this matter? To Haiti? To the world? Pay attention to the roots, the source, the origin. The key is always there, in the roots.

I recently went on a pilgrimage to Ghana in West Africa. I've been to Ghana before, but I had not been to the slave camps, or to the castles where newly captured people, imprisoned and then boarded on ships for sale and slavery in the Americas and the Caribbean.

At the site of the slave camps, evidence of what happened there is still visible. Bowls for food chiseled in the rock, by the slaves, hundreds of years ago, are still there. Water wells dug in the ground, are still there. Burial grounds for those who died are still there. In the oral tradition of our ancestors who told the story of what happened there, passing the story down from generation to generation, you can see and hear the cries of our African forbearers, longing to breathe free.

And then there were the trees standing in the field surrounding the slave camps. People were tied to those trees at night. Those trees saw it all. Those trees, still there, are witnesses to what happened. Those trees, like the tree that became a cross, bear witness.

One of the trees, on which undoubtedly hundreds of enslaved people were tied had a root system underneath it, the likes of which I have never seen. The roots above the soil were large and thick. And you could see them digging down into the soil where the minerals and sources of life are to be found. The roots of the tree are the key to the life of the tree.

The prophet Jeremiah said it this way:

 

Blessed are those who trust in the Lord,

whose trust is the Lord.

They shall be like a tree planted by water,

sending out its roots by the stream.

It shall not fear when heat comes,

and its leaves shall stay green;

in the year of drought it is not anxious,

and it does not cease to bear fruit.

Jeremiah 17:7-8

 

The roots of that old African tree are the keys to its life. The roots of this Diocese will be the keys to its life and future. And the roots of this Diocese are in Jesus Christ who said:

"Abide in me as I abide in you. Just as the branch cannot bear fruit by itself unless it abides in the vine, neither can you unless you abide in me. I am the vine, you are the branches. Those who abide in me and I in them bear much fruit, because apart from me you can do nothing."

John 15:4-5

 

Jesus of Nazareth, crucified and risen from the dead, he is the root, he and his way are the keys to the future of the Diocese of Haiti and to the entire Episcopal Church.  Jesus is the root which anchors us when the storms of life threaten to tear us down.

So why does this work of reconciliation, this covenant, matter? It's all about that roots. The roots of that old African tree are the keys to its life. The roots of this Diocese will be the keys to its life and future.

When I met with the Bishop and Standing Committee last summer, we met in the conference room of Diocesan House. When I sat down in my seat I happened to look across the room. There, on the wall, was the famous portrait of Bishop James Theodore Holly, first Bishop of this Diocese.

When I saw that portrait it brought to mind a deep childhood memory. My father was an Episcopal priest. And like many priests of African descent in the Episcopal Church in those days, he had copies of the books of Father George Freeman Bragg, Jr.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries Dr. Bragg, the Rector of St. James' Baltimore, chronicled the history of sons and daughters of Africa in the Episcopal Church.

When I was a child I use to play in my father's study. And I remember thumbing through his books. One of the pictures and biographies was that picture of Bishop James Theodore Holly. I've been seeing that picture of him since I was a very little child. And he has long been a hero to me.

Still longer, Bishop Holly is a hero and saint here, now one of the saints and worthies on the official calendar of our Episcopal Church.  One whose witness to the strength of Jesus, and whose hope in a new future for the people of this beautiful island still nurtures the growth of this diocese and also the Episcopal Church itself.

Soon after Bishop Holly left the United States and moved here, 43 members of the group who immigrated with the Bishop died from yellow fever and malaria, including his wife and some of his children. But he and others stayed. Bishop Holly loved Haiti, and the government eventually made him a Haitian citizen. And he is buried here in Haiti.

At some point in his ministry Bishop Holly returned to the United States to raise funds and gather support in the wider Episcopal Church for the Church in Haiti. In one lecture he made the case for their continuing to financially support the work. The title of the lecture was, "A Vindication of the Capacity of the Negro Race for Self-Government, and Civilized Progress as Demonstrated by Historical Events of the Haitian Revolution."

He reminded his audience that under the leadership of Toussaint L’ Overture the people of Haiti, brought here as slaves had done something incredible. In the American Revolution, most of the American colonists had at least some semblance of freedom before the American Revolution. They were colonists, not slaves.  But the Haitian Revolution was a revolution of people who were slaves. And like the Hebrews under Moses in the Bible, they sought and won their freedom.

Bishop Holly said it this way:

The revolution in Haiti “is one of the noblest, grandest, and most justifiable outbursts against tyrannical oppression that is recorded on the pages of the world's history.

A race of almost dehumanized men -- made so by an oppressive slavery of three centuries -- arose from their slumber of ages, and redressed their own unparalleled wrongs with a terrible hand in the name of God and humanity."

"In the name of God and humanity." There in that voice, there in those words, there in the spirit of James Theodore Holly who lived for this Church and this land, there are the roots of this diocese.

The roots of this diocese are in Bishop Holly's fervent desire that the loving, liberating and life giving Gospel of Jesus Christ should be proclaimed among the descendants of Africa here in Haiti.

The roots of this Diocese are in Bishop Holly's passionate conviction that following the way of Jesus the Church here might help the people and nation of Haiti to rise up and to claim the high calling among the nations of the earth.

But ultimately the roots of this Diocese are in the one of whom Isaiah prophesied when he said:

"A shoot shall come out from the stump of Jesse, and a branch shall grow out of his roots." Isaiah 11:1

 The roots of this Diocese are in Jesus Christ who died, and was raised from the dead, by the loving power of our God, who the Bible says, makes all things new.

So, standing firm, rooted in the faith of Christ Jesus, let the Diocese of Haiti rise up and reach out anew! 

 

Rise up, reach out and go, make disciples of all nations.

Rise up, reach out and go, proclaiming the Good News of Jesus to all creation.

 

So keep on preaching the Gospel.

Keep on teaching the children.

Keep on healing the sick.

Keep on feeding the hungry.

Keep on loving the orphans.

Keep on standing with the poor.

 

And always remember, you do not do this alone. Your fellow Episcopalians stand with you.

For we are not simply the Episcopal Church. Together we are the Episcopal branch of the Jesus movement. And Jesus promised, “I will be with you always, even to the close of the age.

God love you. God bless you. And you keep the faith. Amen!

 

 

 

 

Praying together before the solemn Eucharist on Tuesday, May 23 in Port-au-Prince, Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry (center), Bishop Jean Zache Duracin of Haiti (left), Bishop Suffragan Ogé Beauvoir (right), and members of the Diocesan Standing Committee ceremoniously signed a covenant that “seeks to address and resolve many of the issues of conflict that have been burdening the Diocese.” The Covenant, here, brings an end the pause on fundraising by the Episcopal Church and opens new possibilities for a united future as the Diocese prepares to elect its next Bishop Diocesan in 2018.  Presiding Bishop Curry previously shared letters and the Covenant with the Church. While the covenant has been in effect since April, the signing ceremony provided an opportunity for a public witness to this effort.

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry presented the following sermon at a special liturgy at the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Port-A-Prince Haiti.   Sermon on the Occasion of the Liturgical Signing of Covenant of

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have issued a joint statement calling for prayer, fasting and advocacy.

The statement, For Such a Time as This: A Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy, calls for fasting on the 21st of each month through December 2018, at which time the 115th Congress will conclude.

The 21st of each month is targeted because by that time each month, 90% of SNAP (formerly food stamp) benefits have been used, thereby causing the last week of the month as the hungry week in America.

The fast will launch with a group of national and local leaders doing a three-day fast together May 21-23. These leaders include Presiding Bishop Curry, Presiding Bishop Eaton, and leadership throughout the Episcopal Church.

#ForSuchATime

Video messages

A video by Presiding Bishop Curry is here

 A transcript of the video is located at the end.

A video by Presiding Bishop Eaton is here

Joint statement

The joint statement of Presiding Bishop Curry and Presiding Bishop Eaton is here:

 

“For Such a Time As This”

Joint Call to Prayer, Fasting, and Advocacy

We are coming together as leaders of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and the Episcopal Church to oppose deep cuts to programs that are vital to hungry people struggling with poverty. We make this call in anticipation of the May 21 Global Day of Prayer to End Famine. We highlight the importance of foreign assistance and humanitarian relief as members of the World Council of Churches.

We also make a call to pray, fast, and advocate not just on May 21, but throughout the 115th Congress. At the invitation of Bread for the World, we join with ecumenical partners and pledge to lead our congregations and ministries in fasting, prayer and advocacy, recognizing the need to engage our hearts, bodies, and communities together to combat poverty. As the call to prayer articulates,

 

“We fast to fortify our advocacy in solidarity with families who are struggling with hunger. We fast to be in solidarity with neighbors who suffer famine, who have been displaced, and who are vulnerable to conflict and climate change. We fast with immigrants who are trying to make a better future for their families and now face the risk of deportation. We fast in solidarity with families on SNAP, who often run out of food by the last week of the month.”

 

Domestically, Americans throughout the country are struggling with poverty, and many government-funded programs allow them to care for and feed their families. As we look overseas, we must acknowledge that foreign assistance and humanitarian relief can help to address regions confronting famine and food insecurity, including South Sudan, Somalia, Yemen, and Lake Chad Basin. We will challenge proposals to eliminate or defund proven anti-poverty programs, at home and abroad.

The story of Esther provides encouragement for our fasting, prayer and advocacy. Esther, a Jew, was the wife of the Persian king. When plans were made to slaughter all the Jews in the empire, Esther’s cousin Mordechai pleaded with her to go to the king and use her voice to advocate for them, even though this might place her life in danger. He urged her not to remain silent, as she may have been sent “for such a time as this.” Esther asked people to fast and pray with her for three days to fortify her advocacy before the king, resulting in saving the lives of her people.

God’s intention is the flourishing of all people and we are called to participate in God’s loving purpose by standing with our neighbor who struggle with poverty and hunger. Following the Circle of Protection ecumenical fast in 2011 to fortify the faith community in opposing cuts to vital anti-poverty programs, we may have also been prepared “for such a time as this”. We commit ourselves to and invite our members to one day of fasting every month to undergird our efforts to convince our members of Congress to protect poverty-focused programs.

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Episcopal Church

The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton, Presiding Bishop, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

 

When does the fast begin? An opening three-day fast begins on Sunday, May 21. We will continue by fasting on the 21st day of each month through the close of the 115th Congress at the end of 2018. We fast on the 21st of the month because that is the day when 90% of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits run out for families.

How do we fast? We are calling for prayer, fasting, and advocacy. Fasting is an effort to clear our bodies, our hearts, and our minds from the distractions around us so that we may be more present to God. Fasting from food is one option that many will choose. But we invite people to take on other disciplines of self-denial, such as fasting from technology, or particular habits, which will help them rely more fully on God.

These days of fasting should also be days of advocacy to oppose cuts to public programs that help hungry people living in poverty. Individuals or congregations who participate in the fast will receive updates, prayer and advocacy action opportunities by signing up for either the Episcopal Public Policy Network or ELCA Advocacy.

Prayer accompanies and undergirds the disciplines of fasting and advocacy. It roots our actions in our total reliance on God’s loving grace and mercy. Turning to God in prayer shapes our advocacy and informs our fasting, grounding our actions in God’s call to love and serve our neighbor.

 

 

Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message

The transcript of Presiding Bishop Curry’s video message follows:

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

 

“Beginning on May 21 to fast, to pray, and to love by advocating for our children.”

 

There is a wonderful book that was published some years ago titled Eat, Pray, Love. I want to invite you to fast, pray, and love by advocating for those who have no one to advocate for them.

On May 21, I am going to join with Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and many of our ecumenical friends, in fasting for the day, and beginning a fast on the 21st of every month, continuing until the end of the year 2018, when the 115th Congressional session comes to an end. 

Here is the reason for that fast: That time of the month, around the 21st of every month, is a very difficult time for people who are on public assistance and have received their assistance earlier in the month. So we will fast and pray, to pray that our government and our leaders will find a way to do what is just and kind and compassionate in the best of the American spirit.

But we will not only fast and pray. We are asking you to join with us in advocating in a variety of ways for the poor, for those who need public assistance for children who are the primary beneficiaries of most of the forms of assistance that our government provides. We are asking you to join with other Christians and other people of goodwill to help our government reflect the best of the American spirit by feeding the hungry, caring for our children, and making sure that everyone has the opportunities for life and liberty not only in our country, but in our world. 

There is a story in the Bible, in the Book of Esther in the Hebrew Scriptures. It is the story of the people of God who found themselves in some tough times, and there was a woman named Esther who rose up and accepted the challenge at some risk to herself. A challenge to save her people when they were in jeopardy. At a moment of decision when she was trying to decide whether or not she should enter into the work to save her people, someone named Mordecai sent her a word, and said, “Perhaps Esther, you have come to the kingdom for such a time as this.” 

Maybe we are Esther. Perhaps we in the Episcopal Church, perhaps we in the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, perhaps we who are Christians and people of faith and goodwill have come to the kingdom for such a time as this, to help our country make sure that no child goes to bed hungry. 

Eat, Pray, Love is a wonderful book but I want to invite you beginning on May 21 to fast, to pray, and to love by advocating for our children.

God love you, God bless you, and you keep the faith.

 

Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry

The Episcopal Church

 

 

Resources

Information about “For Such A Time As This” here

The Episcopal Public Policy Network here

ELCA Advocacy Network here

Bread for the World here

WCC Global Day of Prayer to End Famine resources here

#ForSuchATime

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have issued a joint statement calling for prayer, fasting and advocacy. The statement, For Such a Time as This

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings will host a May 16 webinar to discuss Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice.

The free webinar will be held Tuesday at 3 pm – 3:45 pm Eastern (2 pm Central/1 pm Mountain/noon Pacific/11 am Alaska/10 am Hawaii).

No registration is necessary. Additional discussions with different constituencies, including Spanish-speakers, will be held on later dates.

To join the webinar

Please click the link below to join the webinar:
https://zoom.us/j/956329163

Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll):  +16465588656,956329163# or +14086380968,956329163#

Or Telephone:
    Dial: +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)
    Webinar ID: 956 329 163
    International numbers available

There is no registration required in order to attend and view the webinar.

Setup for Use of Zoom
Unless you have used Zoom before, it is suggested that you prepare for the webinar beforehand by executing a first-time setup of Zoom software on the device that you will be using, as explained below.

Zoom will require you to enter an email address, and to have the Zoom browser plug-in (on a computer) or the Zoom application (on a mobile device) installed.   If you do not have the plug-in / application already installed, please do one of the following at any time before the webinar begins:

  • Click on the link above, and follow the sequence of prompts.
  • In your browser, access https://zoom.us/, click on Join a Meeting, enter the Meeting ID 956 329 163, and follow the sequence of prompts.

When you click on the link above to join the webinar on Tuesday, you will be connected without any further preparation.

Submitting Questions
When the webinar is running, the panelists will endeavor to respond to questions.  In the Zoom view that you will have as an Attendee, please refrain from using the Chat and Raise Hand functions, as neither can be monitored effectively. Instead, use the Q&A window to submit your questions, or send them via Email to webinar@episcopalchurch.org

The webinar will be available on-demand shortly after the webinar.

Resources

  • Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice is available here.
  • Becoming Beloved Community Summary here.
  • Racial Reconciliation here
  • Becoming Beloved Community: Introducing the Episcopal Church’s Long-Term Commitment to Racial Healing, Reconciliation and Justice here
  • Leaders call on Episcopalians to heal ‘pain of racial injustice, division’ here

More Info

For more information contact Heidi Kim, Staff Officer for Racial Reconciliation, hkim@episcopalchurch.org, 206-399-7771; the Rev. Canon Stephanie Spellers, Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Evangelism, Reconciliation and Creation, sspellers@episcopalchurch.org, 212-716-6086; or the Rev. Charles “Chuck” Wynder, Staff Officer for Social Justice and Advocacy Engagement, cwynder@episcopalchurch.org, 646-584-8112.

 

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings will host a May 16 webinar to discuss Becoming Beloved Community: The Episcopal Church’s Long-term Commitment to Racial Healing,

The Episcopal Church has joined the Worldwide Anglican Communion in Thy Kingdom Come, a campaign initiated by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby calling for prayer by individuals, congregations and families.

Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer movement that invites Christians around the world to pray between Ascension Day – May 25 - and Pentecost – June 4 - for more people to come to know Jesus.  #ThyKingdomCome

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry will lead the Thy Kingdom Come video messages on May 25.

 

Pledge2Pray

Pledge2Pray kicks off on May 5; sign-up to participate here or here.

Prayer resources for individuals, congregations and/or families can be downloaded at no fee here.

After pledging to pray, be a part of the Let the Light shine social media campaign by posting a photo or video holding a candle or tealight, and pledging to pray.   Information available here.

 

#Pledge2Pray

 

Resources and information

A wide selection of resources and information are available to participate in many ways in Thy Kingdom Come:

  • Episcopal Church and Thy Kingdom Come here
  • Thy Kingdom Come here
  • Prayer resources that can be downloaded at no fee are here
  • #Pledge2Pray
  • #ThyKingdomCome
  • Join the Facebook page here
  • A Prayer Journal to record thoughts, prayers and ideas throughout Thy Kingdom Come; for young people and adults. Download at no fee here

A new inspirational video message featuring a different religious leader each day will be presented throughout Thy Kingdom Come, beginning with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on May 25. 

 

May 25 #ToJesus The Most Rev. Michael Curry, Presiding Bishop and Primate, the Episcopal Church

May 26 #Praise His Eminence Christoph Cardinal Schonborn, Archbishop of Vienna

May 27 #Thanks The Most Rev Paul Kwong, Archbishop of Hong Kong

May 28 #Sorry The Venerable Liz Adekunle, Archdeacon of Hackney, London

May 29 #Offer The Rt. Rev. Griselda Delgado del Carpio, Bishop of Cuba

May 30 #PrayFor The Most. Rev. Fred Hiltz, Archbishop and Primate, the Anglican Church of Canada

May 31 #Help The Most Rev John Sentamu, Archbishop of York and Primate of England

June 1 #Adore The Rev. Roger Walton, President, British Methodist Conference

June 2 #Celebrate His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop, the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom

June 3 #Silence Br. Keith Nelson, SSJE, the Society of St. John the Evangelist

June 4 #ThyKingdomCome The Most Rev. and Rt. Hon. Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury and Primate of All England

The Episcopal Church has joined the Worldwide Anglican Communion in Thy Kingdom Come, a campaign initiated by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby calling for prayer by individuals, congregations and families. Thy Kingdom Come is a global prayer

“Go forth to be people of the Resurrection,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry said in his Easter 2017 Message. “Follow in the way of Jesus. Don’t be ashamed to love. Don’t be ashamed to follow Jesus.”

The Festive day of Easter is Sunday, April 16.                                                            

The video is available here  

The following is the text of the Presiding Bishop’s Easter 2017 Message:
 

Easter 2017 Message

It’s taken me some years to realize it, but Jesus didn’t just happen to be in Jerusalem on that first Palm Sunday. He wasn’t on vacation. He wasn’t just hanging out in town. Jesus was in Jerusalem on purpose. He arrived in Jerusalem about the time of the Passover when pilgrims were in the city. When people’s hopes and expectations for the dawn of freedom that Moses had promised in the first Passover might suddenly be realized for them in their time.

Jesus arranged his entrance into Jerusalem to send a message. He entered the city, having come in on one side of the city, the scholars tell us, at just about the same time that Pontius Pilate made his entrance on the exact opposite side of the city. Pilate, coming forth on a warhorse. Pilate, with soldiers around him. Pilate, with the insignias of Rome’s Empire. Pilate, representing the Caesars who claimed to be son of god. Pilate, who had conquered through Rome the people of Jerusalem. Pilate, representing the Empire that had taken away their freedom. Pilate, who represented the Empire that would maintain the colonial status of the Jewish people by brute force and violence.

Jesus entered the city on the other side, not on a warhorse, but on a donkey, recalling the words of Zechariah:

Behold your King comes to you

Triumphant and victorious is He

Humble and riding on a donkey

Jesus entered the city at the same time as Pilate to show them, and to show us, that God has another way. That violence is not the way. That hatred is not the way. That brute force and brutality are not the way.

Jesus came to show us there is another way. The way of unselfish, sacrificial love. That’s why he entered Jerusalem. That’s why he went to the cross. It was the power of that love poured out from the throne of God, that even after the horror of the crucifixion would raise him from death to life.

God came among us in the person of Jesus to start a movement. A movement to change the face of the earth. A movement to change us who dwell upon the earth. A movement to change the creation from the nightmare that is often made of it into the dream that God intends for it.

He didn’t just happen to be in Jerusalem on that Palm Sunday. He went to Jerusalem for a reason. To send a message. That not even the titanic powers of death can stop the love of God.  On that Easter morning, he rose from the dead, and proclaimed love wins.

So you have a blessed Easter. Go forth to be people of the Resurrection. Follow in the way of Jesus. Don’t be ashamed to love. Don’t be ashamed to follow Jesus.

Have a blessed Easter.  And bless the world.  Amen.

 

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

 

 

El Obispo Presidente Michael B. Curry
Mensaje de Pascua 2017

 

Me tomó algunos años el darme cuenta de ello, pero Jesús no solamente estaba en Jerusalén en ese primer Domingo de Ramos. No estaba de vacaciones. No solamente estaba en la ciudad. Jesús estaba en Jerusalén con un propósito. Llegó a Jerusalén cerca del tiempo de la Pascua cuando los peregrinos se encontraban en la ciudad. Cuando, ellos de repente podrían, en aquel momento, lograr las esperanzas y expectativas del despertar de la libertad que Moisés les había prometido en la primera Pascua.

Jesús planeó y ejecutó su entrada en Jerusalén para enviar un mensaje. Entró en la ciudad, llegando por un lado de la ciudad, casi al mismo tiempo, nos dicen los eruditos, que Poncio Pilato habría entrado en la ciudad exactamente por el lado opuesto. Pilato entró montado en un caballo de batalla. Pilato, con soldados a su alrededor. Pilato, con las insignias del Imperio de Roma. Pilato, representando a los Césares que decían ser hijos de dios. Pilato, que había conquistado, mediante Roma, a los habitantes de Jerusalén. Pilato, representando al Imperio que les había quitado la libertad. Pilato, que representaba al Imperio que mantendría el estatus colonial del pueblo judío por la fuerza bruta y la violencia.
Jesús entró en la ciudad por el otro lado montado, no en un caballo de batalla, sino en un burro, recordando las palabras de Zacarías:

             He aquí que tu Rey viene a ti
             Triunfante y victorioso es Él
             Humilde y montado en un burro

 

Jesús entró en la ciudad al mismo tiempo que Pilato, para mostrarles y mostrarnos que Dios tiene otro camino. Que la violencia no es el camino. Que el odio no es el camino. Que la fuerza bruta y la brutalidad no son el camino.

Jesús vino a mostrarnos que hay otro camino. El camino del amor desinteresado y sacrificado. Por eso entró en Jerusalén. Por eso aceptó la cruz. Fue el poder de ese amor derramado del trono de Dios, que, incluso después del horror de la crucifixión, lo elevaría de la muerte a la vida.

Dios vino a nosotros en la persona de Jesús para iniciar un movimiento. Un movimiento para cambiar la faz de la tierra. Un movimiento para cambiarnos a nosotros que habitamos en la tierra. Un movimiento para cambiar la creación, de la pesadilla que a menudo se hace de ella, al sueño que Dios quiere para ella.

No solamente estaba en Jerusalén ese Domingo de Ramos. Fue a Jerusalén por una razón. Para enviar un mensaje. Que ni siquiera los poderes titánicos de la muerte pueden detener el amor de Dios. En esa mañana de Pascua, Él resucitó de entre los muertos, y proclamó que el amor triunfa.

Así que tengan una bendita Pascua. Salgan a ser gente de la Resurrección. Sigan en el camino de Jesús. No tengan vergüenza de amar. No se avergüencen de seguir a Jesús.

Bendita Pascua. Y bendigan al mundo. Amén.

 

El Reverendísimo Michael Curry
Obispo Presidente y Primado

Iglesia Episcopal

 

Évêque Primat Michael B. Curry

Message de Pâques 2017

 

Il m’a fallu quelques années pour m’en rendre compte mais Jésus ne s’est pas simplement trouvé à Jérusalem en ce premier Dimanche des rameaux. Il n’était pas en vacances. Il n’était pas là pour juste flâner en ville. Jésus était à Jérusalem délibérément. Il est arrivé à Jérusalem aux environs de Pessa’h lorsque les pèlerins étaient dans la ville. Lorsque les espoirs et les attentes des gens pour l’aube de la liberté que Moïse avait promise à la première Pessa’h pouvaient soudainement se réaliser pour eux de leur vivant.

Jésus a planifié et mis en œuvre son entrée dans Jérusalem pour envoyer un message. Il est entré dans la ville, d’un côté de la ville, quasiment, nous disent les spécialistes, au même moment que Ponce Pilate entrait dans la ville du côté opposé. Ponce Pilate, monté sur son cheval de bataille. Ponce Pilate, avec des soldats autour de lui. Ponce Pilate, portant les insignes de l’Empire de Rome. Ponce Pilate, représentant César qui se disait fils de dieu. Ponce Pilate qui, par le biais de Rome, avait conquis les habitants de Jérusalem. Ponce Pilate, représentant l’empire qui les avait privés de liberté. Ponce Pilate, représentant l’empire qui allait maintenir le peuple juif sous un statut de colonie par la force brutale et la violence.

Jésus est entré dans la ville de l’autre côté, monté non pas sur un cheval de bataille mais sur un âne, rappelant les paroles de Zacharie :

Voici que ton roi s’avance vers toi

Il est juste et victorieux

Humble, monté sur un âne

Jésus est entré dans la ville au même moment que Ponce Pilate pour leur montrer et pour nous montrer que Dieu a une autre voie. Cette violence n’est pas la voie. Cette haine n’est pas la voie. Cette force et cette brutalité ne sont pas la voie.

Jésus est venu pour nous montrer qu’il y a une autre voie. La voie de l’amour altruiste et sacrificiel. C’est pour cela qu’il est entré dans Jérusalem. C’est pour cela qu’il est allé sur la croix. C’était la puissance de cet amour déversé depuis le trône de Dieu qui, même après l’horreur de la crucifixion, allait le faire passer de la mort dans la vie.

Dieu est venu parmi nous en la personne de Jésus pour lancer un mouvement. Un mouvement pour changer le visage de la terre. Un mouvement pour nous changer, nous les habitants de la terre. Un mouvement pour changer la création et passer du cauchemar qu’elle est souvent devenue, au rêve que Dieu a conçu qu’elle soit.

Il ne s’est pas simplement trouvé à Jérusalem en ce premier Dimanche des rameaux. Il est allé à Jérusalem pour une raison. Pour nous envoyer un message. Que pas même les puissances titanesques de la mort ne peuvent arrêter l’amour de Dieu. Ce matin de Pâques, il est ressuscité des morts et a proclamé la victoire de l’amour.

Pour que vous ayez de joyeuses Pâques. Allez et soyez le peuple de la résurrection. Suivez la voie de Jésus : n’ayez pas honte d’aimer. N’ayez pas honte de suivre Jésus.

Joyeuses Pâques. Et que le monde soit béni. Amen.
 

Le Très Rév. Michael Curry
Évêque Président et Primat   
de l’Église épiscopale

 

 

2017 Easter Message

“Go forth to be people of the Resurrection,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry said in his Easter 2017 Message. “Follow in the way of Jesus. Don’t be ashamed to love. Don’t be ashamed to follow Jesus.” The Festive day

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