STEWARDSHIP OF CREATION

There is still time to apply for grants from the Episcopal Church Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation that focus on local faith-based projects for mitigating climate change and safeguarding the integrity of Creation.

This marks the next cycle of grantmaking by the Episcopal Church Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation, enabled by Resolution A030,   Create Task Force On Climate Change, approved at General Convention 2015 and charged with the responsibility to develop a grant process to support local ecologically responsible stewardship of church-related properties and buildings.

Recommendations will be made for grants up to $10,000.

Further information regarding this grant process and how to submit an application is available here.

Deadline for applications is August 20.

Episcopal Church congregations, seminaries, schools, monastic communities, non-profits, dioceses, provinces, etc. are encouraged to develop projects that find and establish connections between eco- and social justice, engaging the local community as partners and participants. The projects should seek to foster cooperation between communities of faith, civic, scientific and educational organizations. Projects should have specific outcomes which create lasting impact, enhance faith formation and social understanding and serve groups and/or regions that are vulnerable and/or underrepresented in the church. Projects including intergenerational engagement, demonstrating innovation and creativity, and promoting churchwide learning, understanding and practical application are welcomed. Projects should not be solely focused on materials, salaries, or capital expenses.

The Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation will make recommendations to the Episcopal Church Executive Council for its October 2017 meeting, and final grant decisions will be announced in November with the funds released in December.

Members

Members of the Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation are: Bishop Marc Andrus, Co-Chair, Diocese of California; the Rev. Stephanie Johnson, Co-Chair, Diocese of Connecticut; Paul Anton, Diocese of Minnesota; the Rev. Jerry Cappel, Diocese of Kentucky; the Rev. Patrick Funston, Diocese of Kansas; the Rev. Luis Alberto Garcia Correa, Diocese of  Dominican Republic; the Rev. Esther Georges, Diocese of the Virgin Islands; Julia Harris, Diocese of Oklahoma and Liaison of Executive Council; Perry Hodgkins Jones, Diocese of Atlanta; the Rev. Martha Kirkpatrick, Diocese of Delaware; the Rev. Nurya Love Parish, Diocese of Western Michigan; Kelly Phelan, Diocese of Los Angeles; Peter Sergienko, Diocese of Oregon; Dr. Andrew Thompson, Diocese of  East Tennessee; Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Ex Officio; President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, Ex Officio; the Rev. Melanie Mullen, staff liaison    

For more information contact Ann Hercules.

 

 

 

Previous information:

Episcopal Church announces Stewardship of Creation grant recipients

 

 

 

 

There is still time to apply for grants from the Episcopal Church Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation that focus on local faith-based projects for mitigating climate change and safeguarding the integrity of Creation. This marks the

Sixteen grants, totaling $123,910, have been awarded in the second round of grantmaking managed by the Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation and approved by the Episcopal Church Executive Council at its June meeting.

Grants were awarded to:

  • Diocese of Delaware to begin a four-phase program of evaluating all churches in the diocese’s energy use and help with formation conversations around energy stewardship. This will be a model program for other dioceses:  $2,225.     
  • St. Michael’s and All Angels, Issaquah, WA (Diocese of Olympia), to fund rain garden with a year-long theological educational program on water.  Liturgical materials to be prepared for sharing with the wider church:  $10,000
  • Emmanuel Church, Newport, RI (Diocese of Rhode Island), to support hydroponic gardening with children; food to go to local pantry with important focus on developing meditation and worship materials to deepen reflection on God’s creation:  10,000.
  • St. John’s, Stamford, CT (Diocese of Connecticut), to fund a reforestation program with the Parish of the Good Samaritan in Grose Morne, Haiti and will include a video which will be used with the re-planting program and formation within the community:  $10,000.
  • Community of St. Brigid at the Church of Good Shepherd, St. Louis, MO (Diocese of Missouri).  Farm church program with strong focus on formation around justice, creation care and food security in a committed faith community. Educational materials to be shared:  $8,500.
  • Cultivate, The Episcopal Food Network, applied churchwide through the Diocese of New York.  Development of a website, congregational resources for gardening, and liturgical materials for broad distribution around the church:  $10,000.
  • Church of the Nativity, Raleigh, NC (Diocese of North Carolina), to support and develop low-carbon farming by building a network of interested stakeholders, hosting a farm summit. Program will include development of a white paper to cover theological and practical aspects of low-carbon farming to be distributed throughout the church:  $10,000.
  • Support for the initial work at Bellwether Farm (Diocese of Ohio) consisting of formation materials and other educational resources which would be models for other communities seeking to institute similar programs.   Bellwether Farm is the new diocesan camp, retreat, and education center that will feature a working, sustainable farm:  $10,000.
  • Support for the Rock Point Program (Diocese of Vermont) to develop bee pollinators in the area of an existing solar farm.  Includes a strong program to introduce people of faith and visitors to the concepts of creation care as well as a robust communication strategy which would be a model for other communities:  $10,000.
  • St. Columba Conference and Retreat Center, Memphis, TN (Diocese of West Tennessee).  This collaborative program between the Center and Thistle & Bee will develop and expand a bee pollinator program and educate visiting groups about the theological and practical need for supporting bee pollination:  $9,765.
  • St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Jamestown. NY (Diocese of Western New York).  As part of a town-wide green event, the church will offer educational information and materials to the community about creation care as a theological effort and eco-justice advocacy as a faith-based initiative:  $3,000.7000
  • Kivalina Epiphany Church, Kivalina, AK (Diocese of Alaska).  Program to fund a pilgrimage from Kivalina to engage with Episcopalians in the Dioceses of Olympia, Oregon, and California. Through presentations at churches, home-stays and small group conversations, will build awareness of climate justice. This will be the beginning of developing relationships to foster a shared sense of mutuality and care for God’s creation.  Videos of presentations will be developed:  $8,000.
  • Catedral de San Pablo (Diocese of Colombia), to build a partition wall and plant native plants to alleviate pollution in the area around the Cathedral. Project will also include an educational and formation program on greenhouse gas emission engaging the local community and the cathedral’s congregation:  $4,250.
  • Grace Church, North Garden, VA (Diocese of Virginia), for a two-day conference entitled Exploring Bioregional Spirituality in the Rivanna River Watershed.  Papers and outcomes for learnings will be shared with the wider-church:  $8,000.
  • Diocese of California - This program will help fund a conference on Eco-justice: Safeguarding Climate, Food and Water to engage the diocese and larger community in the intersection of these issues; will provide support for honorarium and logistics for the conference:  $3,500.
  • Church Divinity School of the Pacific (Diocese of California). Grant funds to develop an intensive immersion class on climate justice and form a regional network to connect the students who are participants in the program:  $6,670.       

The Advisory Council was created by General Convention 2015, enabled by Resolution A030, and charged with the responsibility to develop a grant process to support local ecologically responsible stewardship of church-related properties and buildings.

Thirty-nine applications were received in this round. Applicants whose requests were not funded are eligible to revise and re-submit their requests in the third round of funding, which is open now.

Further information regarding this grant process and how to submit an application is available here.

Members of the Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation are: Bishop Marc Andrus, Co-Chair, Diocese of California; the Rev. Stephanie Johnson, Co-Chair, Diocese of Connecticut; Paul Anton, Diocese of Minnesota; the Rev. Jerry Cappel, Diocese of Kentucky; the Rev. Patrick Funston, Diocese of Kansas; the Rev. Luis Alberto Garcia Correa, Diocese of  Dominican Republic; the Rev. Esther Georges, Diocese of the Virgin Islands; Julia Harris, Diocese of Oklahoma and Liaison of Executive Council; Perry Hodgkins Jones, Diocese of Atlanta; the Rev. Martha Kirkpatrick, Diocese of Delaware; the Rev. Nurya Love Parish, Diocese of Western Michigan; Kelly Phelan, Diocese of Los Angeles; Peter Sergienko, Diocese of Oregon; Dr. Andrew Thompson, Diocese of  East Tennessee; Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Ex Officio; President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, Ex Officio; the Rev. Melanie Mullen, staff liaison    

 

Sixteen grants, totaling $123,910, have been awarded in the second round of grantmaking managed by the Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation and approved by the Episcopal Church Executive Council at its June meeting. Grants were awarded

The Episcopal Church Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation is accepting applications for grants that focus on local faith-based projects for mitigating climate change and safeguarding the integrity of Creation.

This marks the next cycle of grantmaking by the Episcopal Church Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation, enabled by Resolution A030,   Create Task Force On Climate Change, approved at General Convention 2015 and charged with the responsibility to develop a grant process to support local ecologically responsible stewardship of church-related properties and buildings.

Recommendations will be made for grants up to $10,000.

Further information regarding this grant process and how to submit an application is available here.

Deadline for applications is August 20.

Episcopal Church congregations, seminaries, schools, monastic communities, non-profits, dioceses, provinces, etc. are encouraged to develop projects that find and establish connections between eco- and social justice, engaging the local community as partners and participants. The projects should seek to foster cooperation between communities of faith, civic, scientific and educational organizations. Projects should have specific outcomes which create lasting impact, enhance faith formation and social understanding and serve groups and/or regions that are vulnerable and/or underrepresented in the church. Projects including intergenerational engagement, demonstrating innovation and creativity, and promoting churchwide learning, understanding and practical application are welcomed. Projects should not be solely focused on materials, salaries, or capital expenses.

The Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation will make recommendations to the Episcopal Church Executive Council for its October 2017 meeting, and final grant decisions will be announced in November with the funds released in December.

Members

Members of the Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation are: Bishop Marc Andrus, Co-Chair, Diocese of California; the Rev. Stephanie Johnson, Co-Chair, Diocese of Connecticut; Paul Anton, Diocese of Minnesota; the Rev. Jerry Cappel, Diocese of Kentucky; the Rev. Patrick Funston, Diocese of Kansas; the Rev. Luis Alberto Garcia Correa, Diocese of  Dominican Republic; the Rev. Esther Georges, Diocese of the Virgin Islands; Julia Harris, Diocese of Oklahoma and Liaison of Executive Council; Perry Hodgkins Jones, Diocese of Atlanta; the Rev. Martha Kirkpatrick, Diocese of Delaware; the Rev. Nurya Love Parish, Diocese of Western Michigan; Kelly Phelan, Diocese of Los Angeles; Peter Sergienko, Diocese of Oregon; Dr. Andrew Thompson, Diocese of  East Tennessee; Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Ex Officio; President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, Ex Officio; the Rev. Melanie Mullen, staff liaison    

 

For more information contact Ann Hercules.

 

 

Previous information:

Episcopal Church announces Stewardship of Creation grant recipients

 

 

 

The Episcopal Church Advisory Council for the Stewardship of Creation is accepting applications for grants that focus on local faith-based projects for mitigating climate change and safeguarding the integrity of Creation. This marks the next cycle

The following Pastoral Message on Climate Change has been issued by Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori with the heads for the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and the  Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada.

 

 

A Pastoral Message on Climate Change
 

from the heads of
 

Anglican Church of Canada

The Episcopal Church

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada

 

September 19, 2014

 

We are united as Christian leaders in our concern for the well-being of our neighbors and of God’s good creation that provides life and livelihood for all God’s creatures. Daily we see and hear the evidence of a rapidly changing climate. Glaciers are disappearing, the polar ice cap is melting, and sea levels are rising. Incidents of pollution created dead zones in seas and the ocean and toxic algae growth in water supplies are occurring with greater frequency. Most disturbingly, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising at an unprecedented rate. At the same time we also witness in too many instances how the earth’s natural beauty, a sign of God’s wonderful creativity, has been defiled by pollutants and waste.

Many have reacted to these changes with grief and anger. In their outrage some have understandably focused on the neglect and carelessness, both in private industry and in government regulation, that have contributed to these changes. However, an honest accounting requires a recognition that we all participate both as consumers and investors in economies that make intensive and insistent demands for energy. In addition, as citizens we have chosen to support or acquiesce in policies that shift the burdens of climate change to communities that are most vulnerable to its effects. People who are already challenged by poverty and by dislocation resulting from civil war or famine have limited resources for adapting to climate change’s effects.

While an accounting of climate change that has credibility and integrity must include our own repentance, we find our hope in the promise of God’s own faithfulness to the creation and humankind and in the liberation that comes from God’s promise.

God, who made the creation and made it good, has not abandoned it. Daily the Spirit continues to renew the face of the earth. All who care for the earth and work for the restoration of its vitality can be confident that they are not pursuing a lost cause. We serve in concert with God’s own creative and renewing power.

Moreover, we need not surrender to political ideologies and other modern mythologies that would divide us into partisan factions — deserving and undeserving, powerless victims and godless oppressors. In Christ we have the promise of a life where God has reconciled the human community. In Christ God sets us free from the captivity of blaming and shaming. God liberates us for shared endeavors where we find each other at our best.

While the challenge may seem daunting, the Spirit’s abundant gifts for service empower us to find common cause with people who exercise countless insights and skills, embodied in hundreds of occupations and trades. We have good reason to hope in all the ways God’s grace is at work among us. We can commend ourselves to the work before us with confidence in God’s mercy.

Opportunities to act imaginatively and courageously abound in all our individual callings. The Holy Spirit’s work in us leads us as faithful consumers and investors in a global economy to make responsible choices to reduce energy use, carbon emissions, and the wasteful consumption of water and other natural resources. As citizens, we have voices to use in educating children about the climate and in shaping public and corporate policies that affect the environment. The Spirit has also given us our voices to contribute our witness to public discussion of just and responsible use of natural resources.

We also have the resources and responsibility to act together for the common good, especially for those most vulnerable to the effect of climate change in the spirit of the seventh Millennium Development Goal, “to ensure environmental stability”. World leaders will meet this month in New York for a Climate Summit, and in December in Lima, Peru, to discuss global cooperation on climate change. Working under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), participants in the UNFCCC’s negotiations hope for an agreement in 2015 that will move toward reduction of carbon emissions, development of low carbon technologies, and assistance to populations most vulnerable to the effects of a changing climate.

We encourage you to take the initiative to engage decision-makers in this godly work in all arenas of public life — in government and business, in schools and civic organizations, in social media and also in our church life.

We are not powerless to act and we are not alone. “We have the power of the Holy Spirit and the indwelling Spirit of Christ to give us hope and courage.”i

The present moment is a critical one, filled with both challenge and opportunity to act as faithful individuals and churches in solidarity with God’s good creation.

 

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

 

Bishop Elizabeth Eaton

Presiding Bishop

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

 

The Most Rev. Fred Hiltz

Primate

Anglican Church of Canada

 

Bishop Susan Johnson

National Bishop

Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada

 

 

i A Catechism of Creation, p. 19. Resources for the Anglican Church of Canada (ACC) are available here. Resources for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) are available here. Resources for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) are available here. Resources for The Episcopal Church are available here.

 

 

 

The Episcopal Church: www.episcopalchurch.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/episcopalian

Twitter: www.twitter.com/iamepiscopalian

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/EpiscopalChurchYT

 

The following Pastoral Message on Climate Change has been issued by Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori with the heads for the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and the  Evangelical