Pomerium

Location

Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch
552 West End Avenue New York
NY
United States
Saturday, October 20, 2018

Alexander Blachly, Director

Strange and Wonderful Motets of the Renaissance

Works by Wert, Gallus, Hassler, Lassus, Monteverdi, and Gesualdo

Time:             8 pm

Tickets:           $25 General Admission

$10 Students, Seniors, and Professional Musicians

Purchase Tickets:

Online: www.gemsny.org/events/pomerium, or

By telephone: (212) 866-0468, or

At the door

Description:

"Strange and Wonderful Motet of the Renaissance" features a selection of works from the sixteenth century that shows composers discovering ways to depict dramatic events and ideas. The program ranges from the exciting theatrical style of madrigalist Giaches de Wert, with his evocations of Christ in the wind storm on the Sea of Galilee and the voice of Jesus from heaven terrifying Saul on the road to Damascus, to Carlo Gesualdo's psychological torment graphically conveyed by searing harmonies, to works that employ "miraculous" music to depict such miracles as the birth of Christ and his Ascension. Often referred to as examples of "Mannerism," the motets in this program can be seen as the counterpart in music to the strange and wonderful images of the "Mannerist" painters of the time.

Program:

RACHEL WEEPING FOR HER CHILDRREN

       Vox in Rama - Giaches de Wert (1535-1596)

THE MIRACLE OF CHRISTMAS

       Mirabile mysterium - Jacobus Gallus (1550-1591)

A VOICE IN THE WILDERNESS

       Vox clamantis in deserto - Giaches de Wert

THE MIRACLE OF ASCENSION

       Omnis pulchritudo Domini - Andreas de Silva (1475-1530)

CALLING TO THE LORD IN DISTRESS (PS. 119: 1-2)

       Ad Dominum cum tribularer - Hans Leo Hassler (1564-1612)

CHRIST’S WARNING

       Tu vis à me - Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643)

CHRIST AND THE CANAANITE WOMAN

       Egressus Jesus - Giaches de Wert

CHRIST ON THE SEA OF GALILEE

       Ascendente Jesu - Giaches de Wert

CHRIST ON THE MOUNT OF OLIVES

       In monte Oliveti - Carlo Gesualdo (1566-1613)

JUDAS, THE MOST EVIL MERCHANT

       Judas, mercator pessimus - Carlo Gesualdo

CHRIST ON THE CROSS

       O vos omnes - Carlo Gesualdo

THE CONVERSION OF ST. PAUL

       Saule, Saule - Giaches de Wert

Performers:

Kristina Boerger, Amber Evans, Chloe Holgate, Sarah Hawley, Dominique Surh – sopranos

Peter Gruett – countertenor

Nathaniel Adams, Patrick Fennig, Christopher Preston Thompson – tenors

Thomas McCargar – baritone

Kurt-Owen Richards, Peter Stewart – basses

Additional information on POMERIUM:

POMERIUM, founded by Alexander Blachly in New York in 1972 to perform music composed for the famed chapel choirs of the Renaissance, derives its name from the title of a treatise by the 14th-century music theorist Marchettus of Padua. In the introduction, Marchettus explains that his Pomerium (literally, “garden”) contains the fruits and flowers of the art of music. Widely known for its interpretations of Du Fay, Ockeghem, Josquin, Palestrina, Lassus, and Gesualdo, the modern Pomerium is currently recording a series of compact discs of the masterpieces of Renaissance a cappella choral music, of which the fifteenth to be recorded, Music for the Tudor Queens, was released in February 2015.

ALEXANDER BLACHLY has been active in early music as both performer and scholar since 1972. He earned his post-graduate degrees in musicology from Columbia University and is a recipient of the Noah Greenberg Award given by the American Musicological Society to stimulate historically aware performances and the study of historical performing practices. Prior to assuming the post of Director of Choral Music at the University of Notre Dame in 1993, Mr. Blachly taught early music and directed collegia musica at Columbia University, Sarah Lawrence College, New York University, Rutgers University, and the University of Pennsylvania, where for eight years he directed the a cappella ensemble Ancient Voices. In addition to Pomerium, Mr. Blachly directs the University of Notre Dame Chorale and Festival Baroque Orchestra.

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